Publications by authors named "Tsuyoshi Kuramoto"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

[Legionella contamination risk factors in non-circulating hot spring water].

Kansenshogaku Zasshi 2009 Jan;83(1):36-44

Ehime Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Science.

We examined water from 182 non-circulating hot spring bathing facilities in Japan for possible Legionella occurrence from June 2005 to December 2006, finding Legionella-positive cultures in 119 (29.5%) of 403 samples. Legionellae occurrence was most prevalent in bathtub water (39.4%), followed by storage tank water (23.8%), water from faucets at the bathtub edge (22.3%), and source-spring water (8.3%), indicating no statistically significant difference, in the number of legionellae, having an overall mean of 66 CFU/100mL. The maximum number of legionellae in water increased as water was sampled downstream:180 CFU/100 mL from source spring, 670 from storage tanks, 4,000 from inlet faucets, and 6,800 from bathtubs. The majority--85.7%--of isolated species were identified as L. pneumophila : L. pneumophila serogroup (SG) 1 in 22%, SG 5 in 21%, and SG 6 in 22% of positive samples. Multivariate logistic regression models used to determine the characteristics of facilities and sanitary management associated with Legionella contamination indicated that legionellae was prevalent in bathtub water under conditions where it was isolated from inlet faucet/pouring gate water (odds ratio [OR] = 6.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.14 to 22.8). Risk of occurrence was also high when the bathtub volume exceeded 5 m3 (OR = 2.74, 95% CI = 1.28 to 5.89). Legionellae occurrence was significantly reduced when the bathing water pH was lower than 6.0 (OR = 0.12, 95% CI = 0.02 to 0.63). Similarly, occurrence was rare in inlet faucet water or the upper part of the plumbing system for which pH was lower than 6.0 (OR = 0.06, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.48), and when the water temperature was maintained at 55 degrees C or more (OR = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.77). We also examined the occurrence of amoeba, Mycobacterium spp., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus in water samples.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.11150/kansenshogakuzasshi.83.36DOI Listing
January 2009

Epidemiology of tsutsugamushi disease and Japanese spotted fever in Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan.

Jpn J Infect Dis 2006 Aug;59(4):273

Kagoshima Prefectural Institute of Environmental Research and Public Health, Kagoshima 892-0853, Japan.

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August 2006

Phylogenetic analysis of envelope glycoprotein (E1) gene of rubella viruses prevalent in Japan in 2004.

Microbiol Immunol 2006 ;50(3):179-85

Gunma Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Sciences, Maebashi, Gunma 371-0052, Japan.

We performed a molecular epidemiological study on the envelope glycoprotein gene (E1 gene) obtained by PCR amplification from specimens of 17 rubella patients in certain areas (Gunma, Saitama, and Kagoshima prefectures, and Tokyo metropolitan area) in Japan in 2004. In these sequences of partially amplified DNAs (283 bases) within the E1 gene, no nucleotide substitution was observed. They were classified into genotype 1D of clade 1 in the constructed phylogenetic tree. One amino acid substitution was found between the amino acid sequence predicted from these DNAs and those of Japanese strains [To-336 vaccine strain (To-336 vac) and its wild progenitor (To-336 wt)]. The results suggest that the rubella viruses (RV) prevalent in certain areas of Japan in 2004 were highly homologous and were closely related with Japanese vaccine strain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1348-0421.2006.tb03784.xDOI Listing
July 2006