Publications by authors named "Tricia A Meyer"

18 Publications

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In Response.

Anesth Analg 2021 02;132(2):e31-e33

Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000005280DOI Listing
February 2021

Position Paper on Critical Care Pharmacy Services: 2020 Update.

Crit Care Med 2020 Sep;48(9):e813-e834

Baylor Scott and White Health-Temple Region, Temple, TX.

Objectives: To provide a multiorganizational statement to update recommendations for critical care pharmacy practice and make recommendations for future practice. A position paper outlining critical care pharmacist activities was last published in 2000. Since that time, significant changes in healthcare and critical care have occurred.

Design: The Society of Critical Care Medicine, American College of Clinical Pharmacy Critical Care Practice and Research Network, and the American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists convened a joint task force of 15 pharmacists representing a broad cross-section of critical care pharmacy practice and pharmacy administration, inclusive of geography, critical care practice setting, and roles. The Task Force chairs reviewed and organized primary literature, outlined topic domains, and prepared the methodology for group review and consensus. A modified Delphi method was used until consensus (> 66% agreement) was reached for each practice recommendation. Previous position statement recommendations were reviewed and voted to either retain, revise, or retire. Recommendations were categorized by level of ICU service to be applicable by setting and grouped into five domains: patient care, quality improvement, research and scholarship, training and education, and professional development.

Main Results: There are 82 recommendation statements: 44 original recommendations and 38 new recommendation statements. Thirty-four recommendations represent the domain of patient care, primarily relating to critical care pharmacist duties and pharmacy services. In the quality improvement domain, 21 recommendations address the role of the critical care pharmacist in patient and medication safety, clinical quality programs, and analytics. Nine recommendations were made in the domain of research and scholarship. Ten recommendations were made in the domain of training and education and eight recommendations regarding professional development.

Conclusions: Critical care pharmacists are essential members of the multiprofessional critical care team. The statements recommended by this taskforce delineate the activities of a critical care pharmacist and the scope of pharmacy services within the ICU. Effort should be made from all stakeholders to implement the recommendations provided, with continuous effort toward improving the delivery of care for critically ill patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0000000000004437DOI Listing
September 2020

Position Paper on Critical Care Pharmacy Services (Executive Summary): 2020 Update.

Crit Care Med 2020 Sep;48(9):1375-1382

Baylor Scott and White Health-Temple Region, Temple, TX.

Objectives: Provide a multiorganizational statement to update the statement from a paper in 2000 about critical care pharmacy practice and makes recommendations for future practice.

Design: The Society of Critical Care Medicine, American College of Clinical Pharmacy Critical Care Practice and Research Network, and the American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists convened a joint task force of 15 pharmacists representing a broad cross-section of critical care pharmacy practice and pharmacy administration, inclusive of geography, critical care practice setting, and roles. The Task Force chairs reviewed and organized primary literature, outlined topic domains, and prepared the methodology for group review and consensus. A modified Delphi method was used until consensus (> 66% agreement) was reached for each practice recommendation. Previous position statement recommendations were reviewed and voted to either retain, revise, or retire. Recommendations were categorized by level of ICU service to be applicable by setting, and grouped into five domains: patient care, quality improvement, research and scholarship, training and education, and professional development.

Main Results: There are 82 recommendation statements: forty-four original recommendations and 38 new recommendation statements. Thirty-four recommendations were made for patient care, primarily relating to critical care pharmacist duties and pharmacy services. In the quality improvement domain, 21 recommendations address the role of the critical care pharmacist in patient and medication safety, clinical quality programs, and analytics. Nine recommendations were made in the domain of research and scholarship. Ten recommendations are in the domain of training and education and eight recommendations regarding professional development.

Conclusions: The statements recommended by this taskforce delineate the activities of a critical care pharmacist and the scope of pharmacy services within the ICU. Effort should be made from all stakeholders to implement the recommendations provided, with continuous effort toward improving the delivery of care for critically ill patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0000000000004438DOI Listing
September 2020

Position Paper on Critical Care Pharmacy Services (Executive Summary): 2020 Update.

Am J Health Syst Pharm 2020 Aug 20. Epub 2020 Aug 20.

Baylor Scott and White Health-Temple Region, Temple, TX.

Objectives: Provide a multiorganizational statement to update the statement from a paper in 2000 about critical care pharmacy practice and makes recommendations for future practice.

Design: The Society of Critical Care Medicine, American College of Clinical Pharmacy Critical Care Practice and Research Network, and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists convened a joint task force of 15 pharmacists representing a broad cross-section of critical care pharmacy practice and pharmacy administration, inclusive of geography, critical care practice setting, and roles. The Task Force chairs reviewed and organized primary literature, outlined topic domains, and prepared the methodology for group review and consensus. A modified Delphi method was used until consensus (>66% agreement) was reached for each practice recommendation. Previous position statement recommendations were reviewed and voted to either retain, revise, or retire. Recommendations were categorized by level of ICU service to be applicable by setting, and grouped into five domains: patient care, quality improvement, research and scholarship, training and education, and professional development.

Main Results: There are 82 recommendation statements: forty-four original recommendations and 38 new recommendation statements. Thirty-four recommendations were made for patient care, primarily relating to critical care pharmacist duties and pharmacy services. In the quality improvement domain, 21 recommendations address the role of the critical care pharmacist in patient and medication safety, clinical quality programs, and analytics. Nine recommendations were made in the domain of research and scholarship. Ten recommendations are in the domain of training and education and eight recommendations regarding professional development.

Conclusions: The statements recommended by this taskforce delineate the activities of a critical care pharmacist and the scope of pharmacy services within the ICU. Effort should be made from all stakeholders to implement the recommendations provided, with continuous effort toward improving the delivery of care for critically ill patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxaa217DOI Listing
August 2020

Fourth Consensus Guidelines for the Management of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting.

Anesth Analg 2020 08;131(2):411-448

Department of Anesthesiology, and Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

This consensus statement presents a comprehensive and evidence-based set of guidelines for the care of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in both adult and pediatric populations. The guidelines are established by an international panel of experts under the auspices of the American Society of Enhanced Recovery and Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia based on a comprehensive search and review of literature up to September 2019. The guidelines provide recommendation on identifying high-risk patients, managing baseline PONV risks, choices for prophylaxis, and rescue treatment of PONV as well as recommendations for the institutional implementation of a PONV protocol. In addition, the current guidelines focus on the evidence for newer drugs (eg, second-generation 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 [5-HT3] receptor antagonists, neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonists, and dopamine antagonists), discussion regarding the use of general multimodal PONV prophylaxis, and PONV management as part of enhanced recovery pathways. This set of guidelines have been endorsed by 23 professional societies and organizations from different disciplines (Appendix 1).Guidelines currently available include the 3 iterations of the consensus guideline we previously published, which was last updated 6 years ago; a guideline published by American Society of Health System Pharmacists in 1999; a brief discussion on PONV management as part of a comprehensive postoperative care guidelines; focused guidelines published by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada, the Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists of Great Britain & Ireland and the Association of Perianesthesia Nursing; and several guidelines published in other languages.The current guideline was developed to provide perioperative practitioners with a comprehensive and up-to-date, evidence-based guidance on the risk stratification, prevention, and treatment of PONV in both adults and children. The guideline also provides guidance on the management of PONV within enhanced recovery pathways.The previous consensus guideline was published 6 years ago with a literature search updated to October 2011. Several guidelines, which have been published since, are either limited to a specific populations or do not address all aspects of PONV management. The current guideline was developed based on a systematic review of the literature published up through September 2019. This includes recent studies of newer pharmacological agents such as the second-generation 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, a dopamine antagonist, neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonists as well as several novel combination therapies. In addition, it also contains an evidence-based discussion on the management of PONV in enhanced recovery pathways. We have also discussed the implementation of a general multimodal PONV prophylaxis in all at-risk surgical patients based on the consensus of the expert panel.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000004833DOI Listing
August 2020

Snake Eyes: Coral Snake Neurotoxicity Associated With Ocular Absorption of Venom and Successful Treatment With Exotic Antivenom.

J Emerg Med 2019 May 14;56(5):519-522. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Baylor Scott and White Medical Center - Temple, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, Texas.

Background: Coral snake bites from Micrurus fulvius and Micrurus tener account for < 1% of all snake bites in North America. Coral snake envenomation may cause significant neurotoxicity, including respiratory insufficiency, and its onset may be delayed up to 13 h.

Case Report: We present a unique patient encounter of M. tener venom exposure through the ocular mucous membranes and a small cutaneous bite, resulting in neurotoxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of systemic neurotoxicity associated with ocular contact with coral snake venom. Our patient developed rapid-onset skeletal muscle weakness, which is very uncommon for M. tener, along with cranial nerve deficits. Acquisition of antivenom was challenging, but our patient provides a rare report of resolution of suspected M. tener neurotoxicity after receiving Central American coral snake (Micrurus nigrocinctus) antivenom. Our patient subsequently developed serum sickness, a known delayed complication of antivenom. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: The emergency physician should be aware that coral snake venom may be absorbed through different routes. Neurotoxicity and respiratory insufficiency may be fatal and onset may be delayed up to 13 h. North American Coral Snake Antivenom is in very limited supply, so non-Food and Drug Administration-approved alternative coral snake antivenoms may be used for patients demonstrating neurotoxicity. Emergency physicians should be proactive in contacting a toxicologist to procure antivenom, as well as consideration of adjunctive treatments, such as neostigmine. Furthermore, whole immunoglobulin G products, such as antivenom, may result in immediate and delayed reactions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2019.01.019DOI Listing
May 2019

Incidence, risk factors, and consequences of residual neuromuscular block in the United States: The prospective, observational, multicenter RECITE-US study.

J Clin Anesth 2019 Aug 27;55:33-41. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Syreon Corporation, Department of Clinical Sciences, 260-1401 West 8th Ave., Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 1C9, Canada.

Study Objective: To determine the incidence burden and associated risk factors of residual neuromuscular block (rNMB) during routine U.S. hospital care.

Design: Blinded multicenter cohort study.

Setting: Operating and recovery rooms of ten community and academic U.S. hospitals.

Patients: Two-hundred fifty-five adults, ASA PS 1-3, underwent elective abdominal surgery with general anesthesia and ≥1 dose of non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) for endotracheal intubation and/or maintenance of NMB between August 2012 and April 2013.

Interventions: TOF measurements using acceleromyography were performed on patients already receiving routine anesthetic care for elective open or laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Measurements allowed assessment of the presence of residual neuromuscular block (rNMB), defined as a train-of-four (TOF) ratio <0.9 at tracheal extubation. We recorded patient and procedural characteristics and assessed TOF ratios (T4/T1) at various times throughout the procedure and at tracheal extubation. Differences in patient and clinical characteristics were compared using Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and t-test for continuous variables. Multivariate logistic regression assessed risk factors associated with rNMB at extubation.

Main Results: Most of the study population, 64.7% (n = 165) had rNMB (TOF ratio < 0.9), among them, 31.0% with TOF ratio <0.6. Among those receiving neostigmine and/or qualitative peripheral nerve stimulation per clinical decision, 65.0% had rNMB. After controlling for confounders, we observed male gender (odds ratio: 2.60, P = 0.008), higher BMI (odds ratio: 1.04/unit, P = 0.043), and surgery at a community hospital (odds ratio: 3.15, P = 0.006) to be independently associated with increased odds of rNMB.

Conclusions: Assessing TOF ratios blinded to the care team, we found that the majority of patients (64.7%) in this study had rNMB at tracheal extubation, despite neostigmine administration and qualitative peripheral nerve stimulation used for routine clinical care. Qualitative neuromuscular monitoring and clinical judgement often fails to detect rNMB after neostigmine reversal with potential severe consequences to the patient. Our data suggests that clinical care could be improved by considering quantitative neuromuscular monitoring for routine care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jclinane.2018.12.042DOI Listing
August 2019

Effect of adding tetracaine to bupivacaine on duration of analgesia in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blocks for ambulatory shoulder surgery.

Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent) 2015 Jul;28(3):307-11

Department of Anesthesiology, Baylor Scott and White Health, and the Texas A&M University System Health Science Center College of Medicine, Temple, Texas.

The objective of this study was to determine if the addition of 1% tetracaine to 0.25% bupivacaine prolonged the duration of postoperative analgesia of supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blockade for patients undergoing ambulatory shoulder surgery. We conducted a prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical study at an ambulatory surgery center utilizing ultrasound- and nerve stimulation-guided supraclavicular nerve blockade for postoperative analgesia. The control group received 30 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 4 mL preservative-free saline. The study group received 30 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine plus 4 mL of 1% tetracaine. Patients documented their visual analog scale scores and intake of pain medications for 3 days. Primary outcomes included time of first postoperative pain, time of first postoperative pain pill, and time of return of motor and sensory function. Secondary outcomes included pain score and pain medication intake trends and adverse events secondary to the nerve block. A total of 84 patients completed the study, 42 patients in each group. The study group was statistically significantly older than the control group (mean age, 54 vs 48 years; P = 0.04). The mean duration of analgesia was 16.6 ± 8.3 h for the control group and 17.1 ± 7.3 h for the study group (P = 0.69). No outcomes were statistically different. In conclusion, there was no significant difference in duration of postoperative analgesia with the addition of 1% tetracaine to 0.25% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blockade. No differences were identified in postoperative pain medications, pain scores, or complications.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4462207PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08998280.2015.11929258DOI Listing
July 2015

Consensus guidelines for the management of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

Anesth Analg 2014 Jan;118(1):85-113

From the *Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina; †Service d'Anesthésiologie-Réanimation Chirurgicale, CHU de Hautepierre, and EA 3072, Faculté de Médecine, Strasbourg, France; ‡Department of Anesthesiology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; §Department of Anesthesiology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany; ‖Department of Pharmacy/Anesthesiology, BaylorScott & White Health, Temple, Texas ¶Department of Anesthesiology & Pediatrics, Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; #Department of Anesthesia, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; **Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia; ††Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, UCSF Medical Center at Mt. Zion, San Francisco, California; ‡‡Department of Anesthesiology, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; §§Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine, and Pain Management, University of Miami, Miami, Florida; ‖‖Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong; ¶¶Department of Anesthesia, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; ##System Nursing Education and Research, Mission Health System, Asheville, North Carolina; ***Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina; †††Department of Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Alfred Hospital; Academic Board of Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; §§§Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, Porstmouth, Virginia; ‖‖‖Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and ¶¶¶Divi

The present guidelines are the most recent data on postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and an update on the 2 previous sets of guidelines published in 2003 and 2007. These guidelines were compiled by a multidisciplinary international panel of individuals with interest and expertise in PONV under the auspices of the Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia. The panel members critically and systematically evaluated the current medical literature on PONV to provide an evidence-based reference tool for the management of adults and children who are undergoing surgery and are at increased risk for PONV. These guidelines identify patients at risk for PONV in adults and children; recommend approaches for reducing baseline risks for PONV; identify the most effective antiemetic single therapy and combination therapy regimens for PONV prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic approaches; recommend strategies for treatment of PONV when it occurs; provide an algorithm for the management of individuals at increased risk for PONV as well as steps to ensure PONV prevention and treatment are implemented in the clinical setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000000002DOI Listing
January 2014

Treatment of local-anesthetic toxicity with lipid emulsion therapy.

Am J Health Syst Pharm 2011 Jan;68(2):125-9

Department of Anesthesiology, Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Temple, TX, USA.

Purpose: The use of lipid emulsion to treat local-anesthetic toxicity is discussed.

Summary: Systemic toxicity from local anesthetics is a rare but potentially fatal complication of regional anesthesia. There is increasing evidence that lipid emulsion may be an effective treatment to reverse the cardiac and neurologic effects of local-anesthetic toxicity. A literature search identified seven case reports of local-anesthetic toxicity in which lipid emulsion was used. Lipid emulsion was found to be successful in the treatment of local-anesthetic toxicity associated with various regional anesthetic techniques and multiple local anesthetics. The majority of patients in the case reports reviewed were unresponsive to initial management of local-anesthetic toxicity with standard resuscitative measures, but all recovered completely after receiving lipid emulsion therapy. The initial dose of lipid emulsion administered varied among the case reports, as well as whether a lipid emulsion infusion was started and at what point during resuscitation. Based on the case reports reviewed, an initial bolus dose of 1.5 mL/kg followed by an infusion of 10 mL/min as soon as local-anesthetic toxicity is suspected seems most beneficial. The pharmacokinetics of lipid emulsion therapy in the treatment of local-anesthetic toxicity has not been fully elucidated but likely involves increasing metabolism, distribution, or partitioning of the local anesthetic away from receptors into lipid within tissues.

Conclusion: Lipid emulsion has been reported useful in the treatment of systemic toxicity caused by local anesthetics. The mechanism of effect is unclear, and evidence for the benefit of lipid therapy in humans is from case reports only.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2146/ajhp090644DOI Listing
January 2011

Can local anesthetic-related deaths during liposuction be prevented?

Plast Reconstr Surg 2008 Dec;122(6):232e-233e

Scott & White Memorial Hospital, Texas A&M College of Medicine, Temple, Texas.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0b013e31818d2360DOI Listing
December 2008

Complementary/alternative medicine use among chronic pain clinic patients.

J Perianesth Nurs 2008 Feb;23(1):17-23

Department of Anesthesiology, Scott & White Memorial Hospital and Clinic, 2401 S. 31st St, Temple, TX 76508, USA.

Complementary and alternative therapies have enjoyed increasingly widespread use in recent years. Because of this trend, we were eager to obtain a better grasp on the actual number of people in our hospital's pain clinic who have used these modalities. In an effort to explore the use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) by patients seen in an anesthesiology chronic pain clinic, we conducted a study using a questionnaire. This questionnaire contained two sections, one covering complementary/alternative modalities and the other dealing with herbals or nutraceuticals. More than 400 patients were surveyed, 41% of whom were male and 59% of whom were female. Comparing alternative therapies by gender revealed no statistical difference in males versus females. The most commonly chosen modalities overall were nutraceuticals, massage therapy, and acupuncture. In terms of age, we found that the patients surveyed who were older than 60 years of age preferred nutraceuticals, and that the younger age group preferred more interactive relaxation techniques, such as meditation and massage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jopan.2007.05.003DOI Listing
February 2008

Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia guidelines for the management of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

Anesth Analg 2007 Dec;105(6):1615-28, table of contents

Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

The present guidelines were compiled by a multidisciplinary international panel of individuals with interest and expertise in postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) under the auspices of The Society of Ambulatory Anesthesia. The panel critically evaluated the current medical literature on PONV to provide an evidence-based reference tool for the management of adults and children who are undergoing surgery and are at increased risk for PONV. In brief, these guidelines identify risk factors for PONV in adults and children; recommend approaches for reducing baseline risks for PONV; identify the most effective antiemetic monotherapy and combination therapy regimens for PONV prophylaxis; recommend approaches for treatment of PONV when it occurs; and provide an algorithm for the management of individuals at increased risk for PONV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/01.ane.0000295230.55439.f4DOI Listing
December 2007

Recurrent persistent hiccups after epidural steroid injection and analgesia with bupivacaine.

Anesth Analg 2005 Jun;100(6):1834-6

Department of Anesthesiology, Scott & White Memorial Hospital, 2401 South 31st Street, Temple, Texas 76508, USA.

This case report presents a patient who developed persistent hiccups after epidural administration of dilute bupivacaine on several different occasions. Substitution of saline for the dilute bupivacaine during epidural steroid injection did not result in hiccups; however, subsequent postoperative epidural analgesia with bupivacaine caused a recurrence of the hiccups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/01.ANE.0000153016.82444.20DOI Listing
June 2005

Dolasetron versus ondansetron for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting.

Anesth Analg 2005 Feb;100(2):373-7

Department of Pharmacy, Scott & White Memorial Hospital, 2401 S. 31st Street, Temple, TX 76508, USA.

The management of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) remains a persistent problem. Despite the use of prophylactic antiemetics, breakthrough nausea and vomiting still frequently occur. There have been no published studies comparing dolasetron and ondansetron for the treatment of PONV. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled study in adult outpatient surgery patients. We screened 559 consecutive adult surgery patients, with 92 patients randomized to either ondansetron or dolasetron. The objectives of the study were 1) to determine whether treatment of PONV with ondansetron 4 mg IV or dolasetron 12.5 mg IV would result in better outcomes in patients undergoing day surgery and 2) to compare the cost of drugs used for treating PONV. Thirty-three (70%) of 47 patients given ondansetron required rescue medication, compared with 18 (40%) of 45 patients given dolasetron (P < 0.004). Dolasetron was approximately 40% less expensive than ondansetron, and the costs of the study drug plus rescue antiemetics were 30% less in the dolasetron group than in the ondansetron group. Dolasetron provided greater efficacy for antiemetic treatment because of the need for less rescue therapy. Because of the decreased use of rescue antiemetics and acquisition cost at our hospital, costs in the dolasetron group were less than costs in the ondansetron group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/01.ANE.0000144421.96275.D1DOI Listing
February 2005