Publications by authors named "Trevor James Swanson"

3 Publications

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Predicting probable eating disorder case-status in men using the Clinical Impairment Assessment: Evidence for a gender-specific threshold.

Eat Behav 2021 08 20;42:101541. Epub 2021 Jul 20.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

The Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA) is a widely used self-report measure of the psychosocial impairment associated with eating-disorder symptoms. Past studies recommended a global CIA score of 16 to identify clinically significant impairment associated with a probable eating disorder (ED). However, to date, research on the properties of the CIA has been conducted in majority-women samples. Preliminary research on gender differences in CIA scores suggested men with EDs report less impairment on the CIA relative to women with EDs. Thus, the purpose of this study was to test if a different impairment threshold is needed to identify cases of men with EDs. We hypothesized that a lower CIA threshold, relative to that identified in majority-women samples, would most accurately identify men with EDs. Participants (N = 162) were men from our university-based and general community-based ED participant registry who completed the CIA and Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale. Both precision-recall and receiver operating characteristic curves assessed what CIA global score threshold most accurately identified men with EDs. Both analytic approaches indicated that a CIA global score of 13 best predicted ED case-status in men. Consistent with past research, men with a clinically significant ED appear to report lower impairment on the CIA. Results have implications for screening and assessing for substantial ED-related impairment in men. Additionally, past research using the CIA to identify men with EDs may have under-identified men with clinically significant symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2021.101541DOI Listing
August 2021

An empirical evaluation of the diagnostic threshold between full-threshold and sub-threshold bulimia nervosa.

Eat Behav 2021 08 13;42:101540. Epub 2021 Jul 13.

University of Kansas, United States of America.

Previous research has failed to find differences in eating disorder and general psychopathology and impairment between people with sub- and full-threshold bulimia nervosa (BN). The purpose of the current study was to test the validity of the distinction between sub- and full-threshold BN and to determine the frequency of objective binge episodes and inappropriate compensatory behaviors that would best distinguish between sub- and full-BN. Community-recruited adults (83.5% female) with current sub-threshold (n = 105) or full-threshold BN (n = 99) completed assessments of eating-disorder psychopathology, clinical impairment, internalizing problems, and drug and alcohol misuse. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to evaluate whether eating-disorder psychopathology, clinical impairment, internalizing problems, and drug and alcohol misuse could empirically discriminate between sub- and full-threshold BN. The frequency of binge episodes and inappropriate compensatory behaviors (AUC = 0.94) was "highly accurate" in discriminating between sub- and full-threshold BN; however, only objective binge episodes was a significant predictor of BN status. Internalizing symptoms (AUC = 0.71) were "moderately accurate" at distinguishing between sub- and full-BN. Neither clinical impairment (AUC = 0.60) nor drug (AUC = 0.56) or alcohol misuse (AUC = 0.52) discriminated between groups. Results suggested that 11 episodes of binge eating and 17 episodes of inappropriate compensatory behaviors optimally distinguished between sub- and full-BN. Overall, results provided mixed support for the distinction between sub- and full-threshold BN. Future research to clarify the most meaningful way to discriminate between sub- and full-threshold is warranted to improve the criterion-related validity of the diagnostic system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2021.101540DOI Listing
August 2021

Measurement invariance of the Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory (EPSI) in adolescents and adults.

Eat Behav 2021 08 2;42:101538. Epub 2021 Jul 2.

Recovery Record, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA.

Adolescence is a common period for eating disorder (ED) onset. The availability of psychometrically sound measures of ED psychopathology enables clinicians to accurately assess symptoms and monitor treatment outcomes continuously from adolescence and adulthood. The purpose of this study was to assess if the Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory (EPSI) is invariant across adolescents and adults. Participants (N = 29,821) were adolescent (n = 5250) and adult (n = 24,571) users of the Recovery Record (RR) mobile phone application who provided EPSI responses through the application. Measurement invariance testing was conducted to assess invariance of the EPSI Body Dissatisfaction, Restricting, Excessive Exercise, Purging, Cognitive Restraint, and Binge Eating scales across adolescents (age 13 through 17) and adults (age 18 and older). Findings indicated that all EPSI factors administered in the RR app replicated in both adolescent and adult users. The EPSI factor structure was largely equivalent in adolescents and adults, demonstrating evidence for configural and metric invariance, as well as some evidence for scalar invariance. Our results indicated that EPSI scales measured the same constructs across development. Clinicians and researchers may benefit from utilizing the EPSI to measure ED psychopathology in adolescents and for continued progress monitoring into adulthood.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.eatbeh.2021.101538DOI Listing
August 2021
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