Publications by authors named "Toshihiro Takai"

27 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Signet-ring cell/histiocytoid carcinoma of the axilla: a clinicopathologic and genetic analysis of 11 cases, review of the literature, and comparison with potentially related tumours.

Histopathology 2021 Jun 22. Epub 2021 Jun 22.

Department of Dermatologic Oncology, Osaka International Cancer Institute, Osaka, Japan.

Aims: The purpose of this study was to reveal the clinicopathologic and genetic characteristics of axillary signet-ring cell/histiocytoid carcinoma (SRCHC) and the relationship between axillary SRCHC, eyelid SRCHC, and conventional apocrine carcinoma (AC).

Methods And Results: A total of 11 cases of axillary SRCHC, 4 cases of eyelid SRCHC, 8 cases of axillary AC, and 5 cases of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), were retrieved. Additionally, 14 axillary and 43 eyelid SRCHC cases from the literature were reviewed. Male predominance was prominent in axillary (24:1) and eyelid (42:5) SRCHCs. Axillary SRCHC formed a circumscribed plaque or nodule, unlike eyelid SRCHC. Lymph node metastasis was predominantly seen in axillary SRCHC (72%, 18/25), compared to eyelid SRCHC (19%, 9/47). Both axillary and eyelid SRCHCs were histopathologically similar and showed rare tubular formations. Immunoexpression of cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 19, MUC1, MUC5AC, BerEP4, and androgen receptor was observed in all tested cases of four diseases. Oestrogen and progesterone receptors were negative in both SRCHCs and AC, but strongly positive in ILC cases. Complete loss of E-cadherin expression was observed in approximately a quarter of both SRCHCs as well as in all ILC cases. PIK3CA mutations were detected in all three sequenced cases (two axillary SRCHCs and one eyelid SRCHC).

Conclusion: The histopathological, immunohistochemical, and genetic findings suggest that both SRCHCs are phenotypic variants of AC, although there are differences in sex, macroscopic findings, and the frequency of lymph node metastasis among the three. In contrast, ILC differs from the three tumour types.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/his.14436DOI Listing
June 2021

Intradermal Band-like Lipomatous Metaplasia Can Be Associated With the Regression of Overlying Skin Neoplasms: A Clinicopathologic Study of 20 Cases.

Am J Dermatopathol 2021 Jul;43(7):477-484

Chief, Department of Dermatology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Japan.

Abstract: Lipomatous metaplasia has been rarely reported in both neoplastic and inflammatory dermatological disorders. Most neoplastic cases show the lipomatous change within the tumor silhouette, but band-like lipomatous metaplasia in the dermis under tumors has not been well-described. The aim of this study was to reveal the characteristics and relationship of intradermal band-like lipomatous metaplasia and coexisting skin tumors. A total of 20 cases with intradermal band-like lipomatous metaplasia were retrieved from 10,992 archive cases between April 1997 and March 2020 at Hyogo Cancer Center, and subjected to a detailed clinicopathologic analysis. Nine (45%) patients had superficial variant basal cell carcinoma as a coexisting neoplasm. Eight (40%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma, 5 of which were in situ. The remaining 3 (15%) cases were invasive extramammary Paget disease. All 20 cases showed at least one of 3 signs of tumor regression, namely, partial loss of overlying neoplasia, significant inflammatory infiltrate under the tumor, and fibrosis around the tumor. We concluded that intradermal band-like lipomatous metaplasia could be seen in association with the regressing process of cutaneous superficially-spreading neoplasms.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DAD.0000000000001813DOI Listing
July 2021

Japanese Dermatological Association Guidelines: Outlines of Guidelines for Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma 2020.

J Dermatol 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Dermatology, International University of Health and Welfare, Narita, Japan.

In consideration of the development of treatment options for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the Japanese Skin Cancer Society issued the first guidelines of SCC in 2007 and revised them in 2015. Here, we report the English version of the 2020 edition of the Japanese SCC guidelines. The first half of this article is an overview of SCC including actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease, and the second half discusses three clinical questions: (i) treatment of actinic keratosis; (ii) determination of the resection margin of the primary lesion; and (iii) treatment of radically incurable cases, as contemporary problems encountered in treating SCC. In these evaluations, all processes were implemented according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, Evaluation system. Also, items of recommendation concerning each clinical question were determined by a multidisciplinary expert panel consisting of dermatologists, plastic/reconstructive surgeons, radiologists, and oncologists through a comprehensive literature search and systematic reviews.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.15889DOI Listing
May 2021

Systemic EBV-Positive Methotrexate-Related Lymphoproliferative Disorder Associated With Skin Lesion Resembling EBV-Positive Mucocutaneous Ulcer: A Report of Two Cases.

Am J Dermatopathol 2021 Feb 16. Epub 2021 Feb 16.

Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan Department of Dermatology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Japan Departments of Hematology, and Dermatology, Takatsuki Red Cross Hospital, Takatsuki, Japan.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DAD.0000000000001930DOI Listing
February 2021

A case of Muir-Torre syndrome with a keratoacanthoma and sebaceous neoplasms: Clinicopathological features and a speculation on the pathogenesis of cutaneous tumor type.

J Dermatol 2021 May 1;48(5):690-694. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Dermatology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Japan.

Muir-Torre syndrome is a hereditary condition characterized by occurrence of sebaceous neoplasms or keratoacanthomas and visceral tumors. The most common mechanism for this syndrome is a constitutional defect in the mismatch repair genes. We report the case of a 67-year-old woman with a mutator L homologue 1 (MLH1) mutation. She had a history of endometrial and colorectal cancers. The patient presented with a typical keratoacanthoma on the right cheek and numerous sebaceous neoplasms on the face and trunk. Seven sebaceous adenomas and a low-grade sebaceous carcinoma were excised. Most sebaceous adenomas showed dermoscopic features such as some yellow comedo-like globules and curved vessels in creamy-white areas. Moreover, they revealed pathological features such as keratoacanthoma-like architecture and peritumoral or intratumoral lymphocytes. One of these sebaceous adenomas indicated histopathologically spontaneous regression and another was continuous with the hair follicle. Immunohistochemical staining for mismatch repair proteins revealed loss of expression for MLH1 and postmeiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2) proteins in tumor cells nuclei in both keratoacanthoma and sebaceous adenoma. Nuclei in overhanging epithelial lips of the keratoacanthoma were also negative. These findings suggest that the type of Muir-Torre syndrome-related cutaneous tumor may have been affected by mismatch repair protein deficient sites in the pilosebaceous unit.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.15772DOI Listing
May 2021

High Expression of Lactate Dehydrogenase A is a Potential Promoter of Malignant Behaviour in Extramammary Paget's Disease.

Acta Derm Venereol 2021 Jan 25;101(1):adv00379. Epub 2021 Jan 25.

Department of Dermatology, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo, Kashihara, Nara 634-8522, Japan. E-mail:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-3744DOI Listing
January 2021

Malignant melanoma in situ associated with underlying sarcoidal granuloma: A histopathological mimicker of invasive epithelioid melanoma cells.

Authors:
Toshihiro Takai

J Dermatol 2021 Jan 17;48(1):120-122. Epub 2020 Sep 17.

Department of Dermatology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Japan.

Malignant melanoma is known to show diverse cellular morphologies, including a histiocyte-like morphology. Therefore, many non-melanocytic proliferations or infiltrates can mimic melanoma, and be confusing especially when they coexist with a true melanoma. Herein, we report an unusual case of a melanoma in situ with an underlying sarcoidal granuloma, which mimicked dermal invasion of melanoma. This case expands insight into non-neoplastic lesions closely mimicking melanoma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.15616DOI Listing
January 2021

MYB Translocations in Both Myoepithelial and Ductoglandular Epithelial Cells in Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma: A Histopathologic and Genetic Reappraisal in Six Primary Cutaneous Cases.

Am J Dermatopathol 2021 Apr;43(4):278-283

Department of Dermatology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Japan.

Abstract: Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is an infiltrating carcinoma composed of 2 cell types, myoepithelial and ductoglandular epithelial cells. Although approximately 70% of ACC exhibit translocations of the MYB proto-oncogene or MYB proto-oncogene like 1 (MYBL1), expression of MYB is known to be limited in myoepithelial cells. We investigated the histopathologic and genetic characteristics of ACC in 6 primary cutaneous cases. Histopathologically, 3 cases (50%) exhibited well-demarcated nodules composed of large nests, easily misdiagnosed as polymorphous sweat gland carcinoma. Two cases (33%) harbored large cystic structures resembling spiradenoma, hidradenoma, and digital papillary adenocarcinoma. A papillary pattern was focally observed in 2 cases (33%). A melting phenomenon within the myxoid stroma was seen in one case (17%). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed MYB break-apart in 3 cases (50%). A combined FISH and immunohistochemical method revealed MYB break-apart signals in both p63-positive myoepithelial and p63-negative ductoglandular epithelial cells, suggesting that both cell types constitute elements of the tumor in ACC. Moreover, we established a well-circumscribed variant of ACC and proposed 3 new patterns of cystic, papillary, and melting in addition to the 3 patterns of cribriform, tubular, and solid growth.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DAD.0000000000001755DOI Listing
April 2021

Acquired agminated melanocytic nevus in the acral area is a potential mimicker of acral lentiginous melanoma: A three-case series report and published work review.

J Dermatol 2020 Jul 4;47(7):770-773. Epub 2020 May 4.

Department of Dermatology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan.

Agminated nevus refers to a clustered group of melanocytic nevi confined to a localized area of the body. It rarely involves acral skin, but recognition of acquired agminated nevus (AAN) in the acral area is clinically important because it may mimic acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM). However, acral AAN has only been described in a few case reports and its clinical characteristics remain unclear. We report three additional cases of acral AAN to further analyze the differential points between ALM. Clinical images, including those of dermoscopy, of three cases of acral AAN were reviewed. The lesions were located on the sole or lateral border of the foot. All acral AAN were flat and large in size (>20 mm in greatest dimension), and associated with asymmetry and irregular border. However, no parallel ridge pattern suggesting ALM was observed on dermoscopy. In two patients, the lesions on the sole were totally resected; microscopic evaluation of these two lesions confirmed junctional nests of banal melanocytes. AAN lesions on the sole with chronic mechanical pressure are slightly larger and more diffuse; thus, they may be more likely to be overdiagnosed as malignancy upon inspection than those in the non-acral area. Understanding the concept of the disease and careful dermoscopic evaluation leads to an accurate diagnosis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.15353DOI Listing
July 2020

Systemic treatment of patients with advanced cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma: response rates and outcomes of the regimes used.

Eur J Cancer 2020 03 28;127:108-117. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Department of Dermatology, Saitama Medical University, 38, Morohongo, Moroyama-machi, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495, Japan.

Background: Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the second most common type of skin cancer. Few patients with cSCC experience metastases, but the prognosis of advanced cSCC (acSCC) is dismal. Evidence regarding systemic therapy for acSCC is limited. Therefore, we aimed to determine the most effective systemic treatment for acSCC.

Patients And Methods: This retrospective study involved 16 Japanese institutions. We documented patient and tumour characteristics and disease course of patients with acSCC who received systemic therapy between 1st January 2006 and 31st December 2015. We compared the overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for (1) platinum versus non-platinum groups, (2) radiation plus chemotherapy first-line therapy (RCT) versus non-RCT groups and (3) platinum-based RCT versus non-platinum-based RCT groups.

Results: Although the use of platinum-based systemic therapy was not associated with statistically significant improvements in PFS and OS, there were significant differences between the RCT and non-RCT groups (PFS: p < 0.001, OS: p = 0.003). In the subgroup analysis, RCT significantly prolonged PFS and OS in the nodal SCC (nSCC) group. For the RCT and non-RCT groups, the median OS was 110 and 14 months, respectively, and the 5-year OS rate was 54% and 21%, respectively.

Conclusion: RCT could improve OS in patients with nSCC. However, further multicenter prospective studies are needed to establish evidence for superiority of RCT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2019.12.018DOI Listing
March 2020

Tumor Budding Is an Objective High-risk Factor Associated With Metastasis and Poor Clinical Prognosis in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Sized <4 cm.

Am J Surg Pathol 2019 07;43(7):975-983

Departments of Diagnostic Pathology.

Although most cases of early cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) are indolent, a small subset metastasize and can be fatal. However, high-risk features of CSCC are controversial, and it is difficult to predict the biological behavior. In this study, we have tested the prognostic significance of tumor budding in CSCCs <4 cm in diameter. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of surgically resected CSCCs (24 metastasizing and 24 nonmetastasizing cases) <4 cm in size were reviewed retrospectively. Tumor bud, defined as an isolated cancer cell or a cluster comprising<5 cells, was counted at a hot spot (1.23 mm), and graded between 1 and 3; grade 1: 0 to 4 buds; grade 2: 5 to 9 buds; and grade 3: ≥10 buds. Cases with grades 2 or 3 were regarded as positive for tumor budding. We found that tumor budding was positive in 83.3% of metastasizing CSCC, and 37.5% of nonmetastasizing CSCC (P<0.01). Moreover, CSCCs with grade 3 tumor budding showed worse disease-specific survival (P<0.01). Regarding interobserver reproducibility, the median κ value for tumor budding was significantly higher than that for histologic differentiation (P<0.01). In conclusion, tumor budding may be a valuable histologic marker for risk stratification of early CSCC in routine practice. Patients with tumor budding positive CSCC may benefit from evaluation and close follow-up for regional node metastasis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAS.0000000000001284DOI Listing
July 2019

[III. Diagnosis and Management of Keratoacanthoma].

Authors:
Toshihiro Takai

Gan To Kagaku Ryoho 2018 Apr;45(4):622-624

Dept. of Dermatology, Hyogo Cancer Center.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
April 2018

Complete regression of crateriform verruca after partial biopsy: Another type of epithelial crateriform tumor or a subtype of keratoacanthoma?

J Dermatol 2018 Jun 13;45(6):e152-e153. Epub 2017 Dec 13.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Related, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.14186DOI Listing
June 2018

Advances in histopathological diagnosis of keratoacanthoma.

Authors:
Toshihiro Takai

J Dermatol 2017 Mar;44(3):304-314

Department of Dermatology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Japan.

Keratoacanthoma is a common epithelial lesion, but its nature is controversial. Although a distinct crateriform appearance is a hallmark of keratoacanthoma, other benign or malignant skin lesions may show a similar architecture. Moreover, as lesions diagnosed as conventional keratoacanthoma may show malignant behavior, some authors consider keratoacanthoma to be a variant of squamous cell carcinoma, whereas others consider it as a distinct self-resolving squamous proliferative lesion. The controversy seems to originate from the diverse behavior of keratoacanthoma-like epithelial lesions. However, a reproducible histopathological classification criterion has been recently proposed in the diagnosis of keratoacanthoma-like epithelial lesions, and its validity is supported by several reports that deal with the natural course or molecular aspects of these lesions. This article attempts to provide a comprehensive review on recent insights and advances in the histopathological diagnosis of keratoacanthoma or related lesions, as well as summary of related published works.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.13696DOI Listing
March 2017

CD117 (KIT) is a useful immunohistochemical marker for differentiating porocarcinoma from squamous cell carcinoma.

J Cutan Pathol 2016 Mar 29;43(3):219-26. Epub 2015 Oct 29.

Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Japan.

Background: Distinguishing porocarcinoma from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is clinically significant but can pose a diagnostic dilemma. The present study sought to confirm the diagnostic utility of CD117 immunohistochemistry in distinguishing porocarcinoma from SCC and to examine histologic, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) immunohistochemical and CA19-9 immunohistochemical differences between these tumors.

Methods: Immunostaining with anti-CD117, anti-CEA and anti-CA19-9 antibodies was performed for 22 porocarcinomas and 31 SCCs. The extent of CD117, CEA and CA19-9 staining was classified as negative (<1%), rarely positive (1-4%), focally positive (5-29%) or diffusely positive (30-100%). CD117 staining intensity was semi-quantitatively graded as weak, moderate or strong.

Results: All (100%) porocarcinomas were positive for CD117, with mainly focal (8/22) or diffuse (11/22) and moderate (9/22) to strong (8/22) staining. In contrast, only 6 of 31 SCCs (19.4%) expressed CD117 focally, and this expression was limited to the basal layer of the tumor in four cases. CEA immunostaining highlighted the lumina of all 22 porocarcinomas; however, CEA expression was not significantly different between porocarcinomas and SCCs (100 vs. 71.0%, respectively). CA19-9 was not expressed in the lumina of 5 of 22 porocarcinomas.

Conclusions: Along with CEA, CD117 immunohistochemistry could be helpful in distinguishing porocarcinomas from SCCs.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cup.12632DOI Listing
March 2016

Natural course of keratoacanthoma and related lesions after partial biopsy: clinical analysis of 66 lesions.

J Dermatol 2015 Apr 10;42(4):353-62. Epub 2015 Feb 10.

Department of Dermatology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Japan.

There is some confusion regarding the classification of keratoacanthoma (KA) and related lesions that have crateriform architecture. We examined the clinical courses of 66 KA lesions and related lesions after a partial biopsy to clarify the nosological concept of KA. We histopathologically classified these lesions into five types: (i) KA at various stages (53 lesions); (ii) KA-like squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (3 lesions); (iii) KA with malignant transformation (3 lesions); (iv) infundibular SCC (5 lesions); and (v) crateriform SCC arising from solar keratosis (2 lesions). We analyzed the clinical course in each group. The regression rate of KA was 98.1% and that of KA-like SCC/KA with malignant transformation was 33.3%. No regression was observed in either infundibular SCC or crateriform SCC arising from solar keratosis. Thus, KA is a distinct entity that should be distinguished from other types of SCC with crateriform architecture based on the high frequency of regression. The regression rate of 33.3% in KA-like SCC/KA with malignant transformation indicated that KA lesions with an SCC component still have the potential for regression. However, this result also indicated that KA is biologically unstable, and some KA tend to evolve into conventional SCC with a gradual loss of the capacity for the spontaneous regression. Infundibular SCC and crateriform SCC arising from solar keratosis are fundamentally different from KA, not only according to the histopathological findings but also based on the biological properties.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.12784DOI Listing
April 2015

The histopathologic changes in keratoacanthoma depend on its stage.

J Cutan Pathol 2014 Jul 22;41(7):617-9. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cup.12350DOI Listing
July 2014

The changes in the expression levels of follicular markers in keratoacanthoma depend on the stage: keratoacanthoma is a follicular neoplasm exhibiting infundibular/isthmic differentiation without expression of CK15.

J Cutan Pathol 2014 May 11;41(5):437-46. Epub 2014 Mar 11.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

Background: Although the precise etiology of keratoacanthoma (KA) is unknown, KA is generally assumed to differentiate toward hair follicles based on previous studies of experimental carcinogenesis.

Methods: We performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical study of various follicular markers in all stages of KA. A total of 67 tumors, including 16 early or proliferative stage lesions, 43 well-developed stage lesions, five regressing stage lesions and three regressed stage lesions, were subjected to the analysis.

Results: CK15 (clone C8/144B), CK19 and CD34 were not expressed at any stage. CK1, CK10, CK16, CK17, CK15 (clone LHK15) and calretinin showed dynamic changes in their expression in KA depending on the stage.

Conclusions: KA is a follicular neoplasm with infundibular/isthmic (upper segmental region of hair follicles) differentiation. It is considered that early or proliferative stage tumors show keratin-filled invaginations with infundibular differentiation and gradual isthmic differentiation. Well-developed examples of KA generally show isthmic differentiation in the whole lesions. The regressed stage KAs lose the features of this type of follicular differentiation and show epidermal characteristics. No expression of CK15 (clone C8/144B) was observed in KAs, although this finding is insufficient to completely rule out the correlation between the regression of KA and the hair follicle cycle.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cup.12317DOI Listing
May 2014

Cases with a spontaneous regression of an infiltrating non-crateriform keratoacanthoma and squamous cell carcinoma with a keratoacanthoma-like component.

J Dermatol 2014 May 15;41(5):430-4. Epub 2014 Mar 15.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Saga, Japan.

We herein report the natural course of an early/proliferative stage keratoacanthoma (KA) with infiltrating islands of cytological malignancy (case 1) and a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with a KA-like component (case 2), which were observed until their complete regression. The presented case 1 suggests that one of the histopathological forms of KA includes this unusual, infiltrating, non-crateriform architecture, and also indicates the possibility of complete remission in the KA associated with infiltrating islands of cytological malignancy. In the presented case 2, the peripherally-associated KA-like focus was histopathologically considered to be either a remnant of KA focus or verrucous keratosis (hyperplasia). Therefore, the complete spontaneous regression of case 2 suggests that SCC arising in KA still has the potential of spontaneous regression, or that an extremely rare event, namely, the spontaneous regression of (traditional) SCC occurred in the present case.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.12454DOI Listing
May 2014

Case of tumor thrombus inside femoral vein, formed by melanoma metastasized to inguinal lymph node.

J Dermatol 2014 May 12;41(5):427-9. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Department of Dermatology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Japan.

Inguinal lymph nodes are often excised in dermatological surgery, because they are the most common of the lymphatic basin involved in metastasis of malignant skin tumor on the lower extremities or genital region. Herein, we describe a case of cutaneous malignant melanoma on the buttock of a 78-year-old woman. Under the huge metastasized inguinal lymph node, there was tumor invasion into the femoral vein with intraluminal tumor thrombus formation. Careful preoperative radiological assessment enabled successful resection on surgery. A review of the published work revealed that tumor thrombus due to direct invasion of melanoma may be rare. The possibility of intravenous tumor thrombus should be considered in the settings of surgery of inguinal metastasis of melanoma, especially when a large-sized node is located near the great veins.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.12444DOI Listing
May 2014

Two cases of subcutaneous trichoblastoma.

J Dermatol 2004 Mar;31(3):232-5

Division of Dermatology, Clinical Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan.

This report concerns two Japanese women, 54 and 53 years old, with trichoblastoma. Histopathologically, these neoplasms were mainly composed of follicular germinative cells with fibrotic stroma. One of them was a giant lesion, but the other was small. Because both lesions were located in the subcutis, we termed them subcutaneous trichoblastoma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1346-8138.2004.tb00661.xDOI Listing
March 2004