Publications by authors named "Toniya Singh"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The Pivotal Role of Women in Cardiology Sections in Medical Organizations: From Leadership Training to Personal Enrichment.

CJC Open 2021 Dec 2;3(12 Suppl):S95-S101. Epub 2021 Aug 2.

Department of Cardiovascular Disease, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Women in cardiology (WIC) sections have emerged as important leadership, career development, and advocacy forums for female cardiologists. Over the past 3 decades, they have grown from small groups to large sections within volunteer science organizations. In addition to providing a sense of community and promulgating the principles of diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging, the WIC sections have contributed to improving workplace culture and dynamics by generating evidence-based and actionable data, fostering leadership by and scientific enrichment of women, developing task forces and health policy documents targeted toward reduction of burnout and bias in medicine, and providing a platform to voice the unique challenges and opportunities of female cardiologists. The future holds great promise, as the WIC sections continue to play a pivotal role by being intentional, transparent, iterative, and sustainable, and working with important stakeholders, including men, to share data, best practices, and strategies to create and maintain a culture of equity and achieve its core principles.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cjco.2021.07.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8712582PMC
December 2021

Mentors' Perspectives on Our Commitments to Mentees.

JACC Case Rep 2021 Aug 4;3(9):1247-1248. Epub 2021 Aug 4.

Saint Louis Heart & Vascular, St Louis, Missouri, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaccas.2021.05.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8353562PMC
August 2021

How Feeling Like an Imposter Can Impede Your Success.

JACC Case Rep 2021 Feb 17;3(2):347-349. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Department of Cardiology, St. Louis Heart and Vascular, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaccas.2021.01.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8310963PMC
February 2021

Raft of Otters: Women in Cardiology: Let Us Stick Together.

JACC Case Rep 2020 Oct 21;2(12):2040-2043. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Barts Heart Center, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaccas.2020.09.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8299232PMC
October 2020

Global Prevalence and Impact of Hostility, Discrimination, and Harassment in the Cardiology Workplace.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2021 05;77(19):2398-2409

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Background: Discrimination and emotional and sexual harassment create a hostile work environment (HWE). The global prevalence of HWE in cardiology is unknown, as is its impact.

Objectives: This study sought to evaluate emotional harassment, discrimination, and sexual harassment experienced by cardiologists and its impact on professional satisfaction and patient interactions worldwide.

Methods: The American College of Cardiology surveyed cardiologists from Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, the European Union, the Middle East, Oceana, and North, Central, and South America. Demographics, practice information, and HWE were tabulated and compared, and their impact was assessed. The p values were calculated using the chi-square, Fisher exact, and Mann-Whitney U tests. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis determined the association of characteristics with HWE and its subtypes.

Results: Of 5,931 cardiologists (77% men; 23% women), 44% reported HWE. Higher rates were found among women (68% vs. 37%; odds ratio [OR]: 3.58 vs. men), Blacks (53% vs. 43%; OR: 1.46 vs. Whites), and North Americans (54% vs. 38%; OR: 1.90 vs. South Americans). Components of HWE included emotional harassment (29%; n = 1,743), discrimination (30%; n = 1,750), and sexual harassment (4%; n = 221), and they were more prevalent among women: emotional harassment (43% vs. 26%), discrimination (56% vs. 22%), and sexual harassment (12% vs. 1%). Gender was the most frequent cause of discrimination (44%), followed by age (37%), race (24%), religion (15%), and sexual orientation (5%). HWE adversely affected professional activities with colleagues (75%) and patients (53%). Multivariate analysis showed that women (OR: 3.39; 95% confidence interval: 2.97 to 3.86; p < 0.001) and cardiologists early in their career (OR: 1.27; 95% confidence interval: 1.14 to 1.43; p < 0.001) had the highest odds of experiencing HWE.

Conclusions: There is a high global prevalence of HWE in cardiology, including discrimination, emotional harassment, and sexual harassment. HWE has an adverse effect on professional and patient interactions, thus confirming concerns about well-being and optimizing patient care. Institutions and practices should prioritize combating HWE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2021.03.301DOI Listing
May 2021

Addressing Gender Equity in Cardiology.

Am J Med 2020 10 18;133(10):1113-1115. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

ACC WIC Leadership Council Chair, Saint Louis Heart and Vascular, Saint Louis, Mo.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2020.05.016DOI Listing
October 2020
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