Publications by authors named "Tonci Bozin"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Diagnostic Performance of 2-D Shear-Wave Elastography with Propagation Maps and Attenuation Imaging in Patients with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

Ultrasound Med Biol 2021 May 10. Epub 2021 May 10.

Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital Dubrava, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.

We aimed to investigate the diagnostic performance of new 2-D shear-wave elastography (SWE) with propagation maps and attenuation imaging (ATI) for quantification of fibrosis and steatosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Consecutive patients with NAFLD and healthy volunteers underwent liver stiffness measurement and steatosis quantification by means of vibration-controlled transient elastography coupled with the controlled attenuation parameter as the reference and by 2-D shear-wave elastography (2-D-SWE) with propagation maps and ATI as the investigational methods. We included 232 participants (164 in the NAFLD group and 68 in the healthy control group): 51.7%/49.3% women/men; mean age, 54.2 ± 15.2 y; mean body mass index, 29.4 ± 6.5 kg/m. Significant correlations were found between 2-D-SWE and vibration-controlled transient elastography (r = 0.71, p < 0.0001) and between ATI and the controlled attenuation parameter (r = 0.72, p < 0.0001). NAFLD-specific 2-D-SWE liver stiffness measurement cutoffs were as follows-F ≥ 2: 7.9 kPa (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.91); F ≥ 3: 10 kPa (AUC = 0.92); and F = 4: 11.4 kPa (AUC = 0.95). For steatosis, the best cutoffs by ATI were as follows-S1 = 0.73 dB/cm/MHz (AUC = 0.86); S2 = 0.76 dB/cm/MHz (AUC = 0.86); and S3 = 0.80 dB/cm/MHz (AUC = 0.83). According to Baveno VI criteria, the optimal 2-D-SWE liver stiffness measurement for diagnosing liver cirrhosis is 15.5 kPa (AUC = 0.94), and for ruling out compensated advanced chronic liver disease it is 9.2 kPa (AUC = 0.92). To conclude, 2-D-SWE with propagation maps and ATI is reliable for quantification of liver fibrosis and steatosis in patients with NAFLD.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2021.03.025DOI Listing
May 2021

Comparison of prognostic scores for alcoholic hepatitis: a retrospective study.

Croat Med J 2021 Feb;62(1):17-24

Ivica Grgurević, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Clinical Nutrition, Department of Medicine, Dubrava University Hospital, Avenija Gojka Šuška 6, Zagreb 10 000, Croatia,

Aim: To explore the prognostic value of modified Discriminant Function (mDF), Glasgow Alcoholic Hepatitis Score (GAHS), Model of End Stage Liver Disease (MELD), Age-Bilirubin-International Normalized Ratio-Creatinine score (ABIC), and the Lille Model for the 28- and 90-day mortality in patients with alcoholic hepatitis.

Methods: This retrospective study enrolled patients treated for alcoholic hepatitis in Dubrava University Hospital between January 2014 and May 2018. The diagnosis was established based on histology findings or the combination of patient´s history of ongoing alcohol consumption before hospitalization, serum bilirubin above 50 mmol/L, and aspartate transaminase to alanine transaminase ratio greater than 1.5. We calculated mDF, MELD, GAHS, and ABIC on the first and seventh day of hospitalization (including the Lille model).

Results: In total, 70 patients were enrolled. ABIC at admission most accurately predicted the 28-day mortality, with a cut-off of 9.92 (AUC 0.727; 95% CI 0.608-0.827, P=0.0119), while GAHS most accurately predicted the 90-day mortality, calculated both at admission (cut off >7, AUC 0.765, 95% CI 0.639-0.864, P<0.0001) and after seven days of hospitalization (cut-off >8, AUC 0.835 95% CI 0.716-0.918, P<0.0001). Modified DF was able to predict the 28- and 90-day mortality only when calculated after seven days of hospitalization.

Conclusion: There is a need for better prognostic indicators for patients with AH.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7976889PMC
February 2021

Infection as a predictor of mortality in decompensated liver cirrhosis: exploring the relationship to severity of liver failure.

Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2020 11;32(11):1458-1465

Department for Clinical Microbiology and Hospital Infection, University Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb, Croatia.

Background: Infections are common in patients with liver cirrhosis and increase mortality. We explored the relationship between infection and liver dysfunction in their effects on mortality.

Methods: Single-center data on decompensated liver cirrhosis patients hospitalized between March 2014 and December 2017 (index period) were reviewed until death, liver transplantation or 31 December 2018. Infections were classified as community-acquired infection (CAi) or hospital/healthcare associated infection (HCAi). Child-Pugh, model for the end-stage liver disease (MELD) and chronic liver failure-organ failure (CLiF-OF) scores indicated liver (dys)function.

Results: We enrolled 155 patients (85% alcoholic liver disease), 65 without infection at first hospitalization, 48 with CAi and 42 with HCAi. Multidrug resistant agents were confirmed in 2/48 (4.2%) CAi and 10/42 (23.8%) HCAi patients. At first hospitalization, infection was independently associated with worse liver dysfunction and vice versa, and with higher 30-day mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 2.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-6.94]. The association was reduced with adjustment for MELD/CLiF-OF scores, but mediation analysis detected an indirect (via liver dysfunction) association. Twenty-eight patients were repeatedly hospitalized, 11 with new HCAi. HCAi was independently associated with twice higher risk of medium-term mortality and added an additional risk to any level of liver dysfunction, considering all or patients who survived the first 30 days. In those repeatedly hospitalized, HCAi appeared independently associated with a higher probability of infection and higher MELD scores at subsequent hospitalizations.

Conclusion: Infection (particularly HCAi) adds mortality risk to any level of liver dysfunction in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients. Mechanisms of long(er)-term effects (in acute episode survivors) seemingly include enhanced deterioration of liver function.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MEG.0000000000001667DOI Listing
November 2020

Epidemiological and clinical features of primary biliary cholangitis in two Croatian regions: a retrospective study.

Croat Med J 2019 Dec;60(6):494-502

Ivica Grgurević, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Clinical Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University Hospital Dubrava, Avenija Gojka Šuška 6, Zagreb 10 000, Croatia,

Aim: To assess the measures of disease frequency and determine the clinical features of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) in two Croatian regions.

Methods: Databases of two tertiary hospitals, one located in the continental and one in the coastal region of Croatia, were retrospectively searched for PBC patients diagnosed from 2007 to 2018. Epidemiologic data analysis was restricted to patients from each hospital's catchment area. We analyzed factors related to response to therapy and event-free survival (EFS), defined as absence of ascites, variceal bleeding, encephalopathy, hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation (LT), or death. In addition, we determined clinical and demographic data of transplanted PBC patients.

Results: Out of 83 PBC patients, 86.7% were female, with a median age at diagnosis of 55 years. Average PBC incidence for the 11-year period was 0.79 and 0.89 per 100000 population, whereas the point prevalence on December 31, 2017 was 11.5 and 12.5 in the continental and coastal region, respectively. Of 76 patients with complete medical records, 21% had an advanced disease stage, 31.6% had an associated autoimmune condition, and all received ursodeoxycholic acid. EFS rate at 5 years was 95.8%. In an age and sex-adjusted multivariate Cox regression model, the only factor significantly associated with inferior EFS was no response to therapy (HR=18.4; P=0.018). Of all Croatian patients who underwent LT, 3.8% had PBC, with the survival rate at 5 years after LT of 93.4%.

Conclusion: This study gives pioneer insights into the epidemiological and clinical data on PBC in Croatia, thus complementing the PBC map of Southeast Europe.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6952898PMC
December 2019

Magnitude dependent discordance in liver stiffness measurements using elastography point quantification with transient elastography as the reference test.

Eur Radiol 2019 May 28;29(5):2448-2456. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Clinical Nutrition; Department of Medicine, University Hospital Dubrava, University of Zagreb School of Medicine and Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Avenija Gojka Suska 6, 10000, Zagreb, Croatia.

Objectives: To investigate diagnostic performance of point shear wave elastography by elastography point quantification (ElastPQ) for non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD).

Methods: Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) by transient elastography (TE) and ElastPQ was performed in patients with CLD and healthy volunteers. The stage of liver fibrosis was defined by TE which served as the reference. We compared two methods by using correlation, area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) analysis, Bland and Altman plot and Passing-Bablok regression.

Results: A total of 185 subjects (20 healthy volunteers and 165 patients with CLD (128 non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), 83 (44.9%) females, median age 53 years, BMI 27.3 kg/m) were evaluated. There were 24.3%, 13.5% and 11.4% patients in ≥ F2, ≥ F3 and F4 stage, respectively. The best performing cutoff LSM values by ElastPQ were 5.5 kPa for F ≥ 2 (AUC = 0.96), 8.1 kPa for F ≥ 3 (AUC = 0.98) and 9.9 kPa for F4 (AUC = 0.98). Mean (SD) difference between TE and ElastPQ measurements was 0.98 (3.27) kPa (95% CI 0.51-1.45, range 4.99-21.60 kPa). Two methods correlated significantly (r = 0.86; p < 0.001), yet Bland and Altman plot demonstrated difference between measurements, especially with TE values > 10 kPa. Passing and Bablok regression analysis yielded significant constant and proportional difference between ElastPQ and TE.

Conclusion: ElastPQ is reliable method for assessment of liver fibrosis but LSM values are not interchangeable with TE, especially above 10 kPa. Diagnostic performance of ElastPQ for sub-classification of patients with compensated advanced chronic liver disease should therefore be furtherly investigated.

Key Points: • ElastPQ appears to be reliable method for assessment of liver fibrosis, with data presented here mostly applicable to NAFLD. • LSM values produced by TE and ElastPQ are NOT interchangeable-in values < 10 kPa, they are similar, but in values > 10 kPa, they appear to be increasingly and significantly different. • Diagnostic performance of ElastPQ for sub-classification of patients with compensated advanced chronic liver disease should be furtherly investigated.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-018-5831-2DOI Listing
May 2019

Albi Score as a Predictor of Survival in Patients with Compensated Cirrhosis Resected for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Exploratory Evaluation in Relationship to Palbi and Meld Liver Function Scores.

Acta Clin Croat 2018 Jun;57(2):292-300

Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Clinical Nutrition, Dubrava University Hospital, Zagreb, Croatia.

The aim of the study was to explore predictive value of the ALBI, PALBI and MELD scores on survival in patients resected for hepatocellular carcinoma with compensated liver cirrhosis and no macrovascular infiltration. In this retrospective study, longitudinal survival analysis was performed. We analyzed patient/tumor characteristics and MELD, ALBI and PALBI scores as liver function tests for predicting survival outcome. Survival was analyzed from the date of liver resection until death, liver transplantation, or end of follow-up. Patients were stratified for age, cirrhosis etiology, presence of esophageal varices, hepatocellular carcinoma stage, microvascular invasion, histologic differentiation, and resection margins. We identified 38 patients (alcoholic cirrhosis in 84.2% of patients) resected over an 8-year period. Median preoperative MELD score was 8, ALBI score -2.63, and PALBI score -2.38. During the follow-up period, 24 patients died. Estimated median survival time was 36 months. Microvascular invasion was observed in 33 patients. Higher ALBI score was associated with 23.1% higher relative risk of death. PALBI score was associated with 12.1% higher relative risk of death, whereas MELD score was not associated with the risk of death. In conclusion, ALBI score demonstrated significant predictive capabilities for survival in patients with compensated cirrhosis resected for hepatocellular carcinoma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.20471/acc.2018.57.02.09DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6531997PMC
June 2018

Hepatitis C is now curable, but what happens with cirrhosis and portal hypertension afterwards?

Clin Exp Hepatol 2017 Dec 16;3(4):181-186. Epub 2017 Nov 16.

University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.

Results from the interferon era have demonstrated reversibility of cirrhosis following viral eradication, but only for patients in the initial stage of cirrhosis. Although direct-acting antivirals (DAA) represent revolutionary treatment of hepatitis C, there are currently no studies showing histological effects of therapy on a large number of cirrhotic patients. However, studies involving transient elastography demonstrated a rapid decrease in liver stiffness after successful DAA therapy, probably due to resolution of inflammation, rather than fibrosis regression, as the latter requires a longer period of time. Reversal of fibrosis and cirrhosis upon viral eradication is a prerequisite for the reduction of portal pressure, but this effect has only been observed for the subclinical stage of portal hypertension (PH). On the other hand, the majority of patients with clinically significant PH remain at risk of decompensation and death, despite hepatitis C virus cure, as PH remains high in this setting. This calls for novel therapeutic approaches.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/ceh.2017.71491DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5731432PMC
December 2017

Non-invasive diagnosis of portal hypertension in cirrhosis using ultrasound based elastography.

Med Ultrason 2017 May;19(3):310-317

Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Victor Babeș University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timișoara, Romania..

Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) by ultrasound-based elastography may be used to non-invasively discriminate between the stages of liver fibrosis, rule out cirrhosis and follow its evolution, including the prediction of the presence of oesophageal varices. The same is possible in order to diagnose clinically significant portal hypertension, referring primarilyto transient elastography and LSM values ≥20-25 kPa. The same approach may be used to reliably rule out the presence ofoesophageal varices (LSM <20 kPa + platelets >150x109/L). These recommendations refer primarily to patients with viral aetiology of chronic liver disease (hepatitis C), while additional studies are required for other aetiologies. While spleen stiffness measurement (SSM) also poses a logical choice in this indication, controversial results have nevertheless been published on this issue. It should be emphasized, however, that more recent data indicate that this parameter should be included in the diagnostic algorithm for portal hypertension, if not as the sole then as a part of a sequential algorithm, combined with LSM. Until now, transient elastography has been most extensively studied and founded on scientific evidence, although the results of other ultrasound-based elastography techniques demonstrate the same trend for the non-invasive assessment of portal hypertension.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11152/mu-1019DOI Listing
May 2017

The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and abnormal lipid status among Croatian hospitalized coronary heart disease patients.

Coll Antropol 2012 Jan;36 Suppl 1:223-8

University of Zagreb, Dubrava University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Zagreb, Croatia.

The aim of this article was to investigate the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and abnormal lipid status with selected anthropometric variables in a sample of hospitalized coronary heart disease (CHD) patients in Croatia (N = 1,298). Prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 31.6% (statistically significantly more frequent in women, 35.7% vs. 30.0%), while prevalences of increased total cholesterol were 72.0%, decreased HDL-cholesterol 42.6% (statistically significantly more frequent in women, 50.2% vs. 39.6%), increased LDL-cholesterol 72.3% and increased triglycerides 51.5%. Reported data on prevalences of diabetes mellitus can be somewhat reassuring (a decrease in its prevalence compared to data from 2006, but they still signal a situation which is a lot worse than in 2002 and 2003); the trend of rising prevalences of dyslipidaemic cardiovascular risk factors must be a cause for an alarm, furthermore as today's preventive and treatment measures in cardiology, both primary and secondary, are strongly focused on dyslipidaemias.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2012