Publications by authors named "Tomohiko Nakagawa"

7 Publications

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Long-term survival case of esophageal carcinosarcoma coexisting with alcoholic liver cirrhosis successfully treated by staged operation: A case report.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2021 Apr 30;83:105946. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Department of Surgery, Ota Memorial Hospital, 455-1 Oshima-cho, Ota, Gunma 373-8585, Japan.

Introduction: Patients with esophageal cancers including carcinosarcoma sometimes have underlying liver cirrhosis because of a history of heavy drinking. It is definitely required to determine the appropriate surgical strategy and to manage the patients promptly when performing esophagectomy for the esophageal carcinosarcoma coexisting with alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

Presentation Of Case: A 56-year-old male patient with a history of chest pain and difficulty swallowing was admitted to our hospital. He had a history of drinking 250 g of alcohol per day. Endoscopy revealed an irregular protruding tumor on the left wall of the lower-third thoracic esophagus. Computed tomography showed a tumor lesion in the lower-third thoracic esophagus; the images also showed irregularities on the surface of the liver, suggestive of coexisting alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The preoperative diagnosis was T3N2M0, Stage III esophageal leiomyosarcoma. In consideration of the underlying alcoholic liver cirrhosis, a staged operation was planned for this patient as a curative treatment. The patient had an uneventful postoperative clinical course and was discharged on the 47th day after the first surgery. Final histopathological diagnosis was T2N0M0, Stage II esophageal carcinosarcoma. The patient is alive without recurrence three years after surgery.

Discussion: This is the first report of long-term survival case of esophageal carcinosarcoma with alcoholic liver cirrhosis that was treated successfully by staged operation.

Conclusions: Despite coexisting with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, staged operation could reduce the surgical invasiveness, so that very good short-term outcome and long-term survival was obtained in the patient with esophageal carcinosarcoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijscr.2021.105946DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8129925PMC
April 2021

Pulmonary valve replacement after tetralogy of Fallot repair in a patient with immune thrombocytopenia.

J Card Surg 2020 Jul 22;35(7):1711-1713. Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Marked thrombocytopenia causes significant bleeding in cardiovascular surgery. Herein, we describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with immune thrombocytopenia who underwent successful pulmonary valve replacement for pulmonary valve regurgitation and stenosis after complete repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Her platelet count decreased significantly to less than 5 × 10 /L on postoperative day 3, thus multiple platelet transfusions were given. Pulse steroid therapy with dexamethasone was subsequently administered systemically for 4 days. After the treatment, her platelet count started to recover. There were no significant postoperative bleeding events, and red blood cell transfusion was not required. Other than the platelet event, the postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 15.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocs.14640DOI Listing
July 2020

X-ray computed tomography imaging of a tumor with high sensitivity using gold nanoparticles conjugated to a cancer-specific antibody via polyethylene glycol chains on their surface.

Sci Technol Adv Mater 2016 26;17(1):387-397. Epub 2016 Jul 26.

Department of Nano-Medical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan; Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.

Contrast agents are often used to enhance the contrast of X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of tumors to improve diagnostic accuracy. However, because the iodine-based contrast agents currently used in hospitals are of low molecular weight, the agent is rapidly excreted from the kidney or moves to extravascular tissues through the capillary vessels, depending on its concentration gradient. This leads to nonspecific enhancement of contrast images for tissues. Here, we created gold (Au) nanoparticles as a new contrast agent to specifically image tumors with CT using an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Au has a higher X-ray absorption coefficient than does iodine. Au nanoparticles were supported with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains on their surface to increase the blood retention and were conjugated with a cancer-specific antibody via terminal PEG chains. The developed Au nanoparticles were injected into tumor-bearing mice, and the distribution of Au was examined with CT imaging, transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results show that specific localization of the developed Au nanoparticles in the tumor is affected by a slight difference in particle size and enhanced by the conjugation of a specific antibody against the tumor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14686996.2016.1194167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5101864PMC
July 2016

Synthesis of high concentration colloid solution of silica-coated AgI nanoparticles.

J Nanosci Nanotechnol 2012 Aug;12(8):6741-5

College of Engineering, Ibaraki University, Hitachi, Ibaraki 316-8511, Japan.

Methods for high concentration silica-coated silver iodide (AgI/SiO2) particles, which could be practically used as X-ray contrast agent, were examined. The first was a single-step method, which was to prepare AgI nanoparticles at an AgI concentration of 5 x 10(-3) M and coat the AgI nanoparticles with silica shell by a Stöber method. The second was a multiple-step method, which was to repeat a step for preparing a AgI/SiO2 particle colloid solution with 10(-3) M AgI 5 times for adjusting a final AgI concentration to 5 x 10(-3) M. In the two methods, dominant particle aggregation took place, though core-shell particles were also produced. The third was a salting-out method, which was to salt out AgI/SiO2 particles in their colloid solution prepared at an AgI concentration of 10(-3) M, remove supernatant by decantation, and redisperse the particles in a fresh solvent. Consequently, AgI/SiO2 particles with an AgI concentration as high as 0.05 M were successfully prepared with the salting-out method, and their core-shell structure was not damaged during the salting-out.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1166/jnn.2012.4531DOI Listing
August 2012

Modulation of ammonium perfluorooctanoate-induced hepatic damage by genetically different PPARα in mice.

Arch Toxicol 2012 Jan 17;86(1):63-74. Epub 2011 Apr 17.

Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Showa-ku, Aichi, Japan.

Perfluorooctanoic acid is a ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα). Ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) at 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg doses activated mouse PPARα, but not human PPARα. This study aimed to clarify whether milligram-order APFO can activate human PPARα, and the receptor is involved in APFO-induced chronic hepatic damage. Male Sv/129 wild-type (mPPARα), Pparα-null, and humanized PPARα (hPPARα) mice (8 weeks old) were divided into three groups. The first was treated with water and the other two with 1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg APFO for 6 weeks, orally, respectively. Both doses activated mouse and human PPARα to a similar or lower degree in the latter. APFO dose dependently increased hepatic triglyceride levels in Pparα-null and hPPARα mice, but conversely decreased those in mPPARα ones. APFO-induced hepatic damage differed markedly among the three genotyped groups: single-cell necrosis was observed in all genotyped mice; inflammatory cells and macrovesicular steatosis only in Pparα-null mice; and microvesicular steatosis and hydropic degenerations in hPPARα and Pparα-null mice. The molecular mechanism underlying these differences may be attributable to those of gene expressions involved in lipid homeostasis (PPARα, β- and ω-oxidation enzymes, and diacylglycerol acyltransferases) and uncoupling protein 2. Thus, milligram-order APFO activated both mouse and human PPARα in a different manner, which may reflect histopathologically different types of hepatic damage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00204-011-0704-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6594146PMC
January 2012

Control of shell thickness in silica-coating of Au nanoparticles and their X-ray imaging properties.

J Colloid Interface Sci 2011 Jun 22;358(2):329-33. Epub 2011 Jan 22.

Department of Biomolecular Functional Engineering, College of Engineering, Ibaraki University, Ibaraki 316-8511, Japan.

This paper describes a performance of precise control of shell thickness in silica-coating of Au nanoparticles based on a sol-gel process, and an investigation into X-ray imaging properties for the silica-coated Au (Au/SiO(2)) particles. The Au nanoparticles with a size of 16.9±1.2 nm prepared through a conventional citrate reduction method were used as core particles. The Au nanoparticles were silica-coated with a sol-gel reaction using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) as a silica source, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as a catalyst, and (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APMS) as a silane coupling agent. An increase in TEOS concentration resulted in an increase in shell thickness. Under certain concentrations of Au, H(2)O, NaOH, and APMS, the Au/SiO(2) particles with silica shell thickness of 6.0-61.0 nm were produced with varying TEOS concentration. Absorption peak wavelength of surface plasmon resonance of the Au/SiO(2) colloid solution depended on silica shell thickness, which agreed approximately with the predictions by Mie theory. The as-prepared colloid solution could be concentrated up to an Au concentration of 0.19 M with salting-out and centrifugation. The concentrated colloid solution showed an X-ray image with high contrast, and a computed tomography value for the colloid solution with an Au concentration of 0.129 M was achieved 1329.7±52.7 HU.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcis.2011.01.058DOI Listing
June 2011

Molecular mechanics and molecular orbital simulations on specific interactions between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor PPARalpha and plasticizer.

J Mol Graph Model 2008 Aug 23;27(1):45-58. Epub 2008 Feb 23.

Department of Occupational Environmental Health, Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) has various physiological functions such as lipid and glucose metabolism, inflammation and fibrosis in living organisms. Many types of ligand molecules such as phthalate and adipate esters control these physiological functions. In the present study, to elucidate the dependence of PPARalpha properties on ligand binding, we investigated stable structures and electronic properties for the complexes of PPARalpha and phthalate as well as adipate esters, which are used as a plasticizer, by molecular simulations based on molecular mechanics and molecular orbital methods. Furthermore, to elucidate the influence of these esters in vivo, we injected them into male mice and observed the change in the expression of PPARalpha-related enzymes. The comparison between the calculated and observed results indicates that the change in the expression has a correlation with the size of energy gaps between highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of the complexes with mouse PPARalpha and esters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmgm.2008.02.003DOI Listing
August 2008