Publications by authors named "Tito Fernandes"

9 Publications

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One Health, Fermented Foods, and Gut Microbiota.

Foods 2018 Dec 3;7(12). Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Lisboa, 1300-477 Lisboa, Portugal.

Changes in present-day society such as diets with more sugar, salt, and saturated fat, bad habits and unhealthy lifestyles contribute to the likelihood of the involvement of the microbiota in inflammatory diseases, which contribute to global epidemics of obesity, depression, and mental health concerns. The microbiota is presently one of the hottest areas of scientific and medical research, and exerts a marked influence on the host during homeostasis and disease. Fermented foods and beverages are generally defined as products made by microbial organisms and enzymatic conversions of major and minor food components. Further to the commonly-recognized effects of nutrition on the digestive health (e.g., dysbiosis) and well-being, there is now strong evidence for the impact of fermented foods and beverages (e.g., yoghurt, pickles, bread, kefir, beers, wines, mead), produced or preserved by the action of microorganisms, on general health, namely their significance on the gut microbiota balance and brain functionality. Fermented products require microorganisms, i.e., yeasts and lactic acid bacteria, yielding alcohol and lactic acid. Ingestion of vibrant probiotics, especially those contained in fermented foods, is found to cause significant positive improvements in balancing intestinal permeability and barrier function. Our guts control and deal with every aspect of our health. How we digest our food and even the food sensitivities we have is linked with our mood, behavior, energy, weight, food cravings, hormone balance, immunity, and overall wellness. We highlight some impacts in this domain and debate calls for the convergence of interdisciplinary research fields from the United Nations' initiative. Worldwide human and animal medicine are practiced separately; veterinary science and animal health are generally neither considered nor inserted within national or international Health discussions. The absence of a clear definition and subsequent vision for the future of One Health may act as a barrier to transdisciplinary collaboration. The point of this mini review is to highlight the role of fermented foods and beverages on gut microbiota and debate if the need for confluence of transdisciplinary fields of One Health is feasible and achievable, since they are managed by separate sectors with limited communication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods7120195DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306734PMC
December 2018

biomass increases dendritic arborization of newly-generated neurons in mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus.

Oncotarget 2018 Aug 31;9(68):32929-32942. Epub 2018 Aug 31.

CNC-Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal.

Brain cognitive reserve refers to the ability of the brain to manage different challenges that arise throughout life, making it resilient to neuropathology. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis has been considered to be a relevant contributor for brain cognitive reserve and brain plasticity. (CV), a common healthful mushroom, has been receiving increasing attention by its antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antibacterial, and immunomodulatory properties, including in the hippocampus. Herein, we evaluated whether CV biomass oral administration for 2.5 months enhances hippocampal neurogenic reserve under normal/physiological conditions, by quantifying hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) granular cell layer (GCL) and subgranular zone (SGZ) volumes, proliferation, number and dendritic complexity features of hippocampal newly-generated neurons. We also analyzed β-catenin levels in DG newly-generated immature neurons, because it plays a major role in neurogenesis. Although no differences were observed in the volume of GCL and SGZ layers, in proliferation and in the number of newly-generated neurons of controls and CV-administered mice, we found that CV administration promotes a significant increase in dendritic length and branching and total dendritic volume of immature neurons, suggesting a positive effect of oral CV administration in the hippocampal neurogenic reserve. We also observed that β-catenin levels are increased both in the nucleus and cytoplasm of DG immature neurons, suggesting that Wnt/β-catenin signalling may play an important role in the CV positive effect on the differentiation of these cells. These data unveil a so far unexplored neurogenic potential of CV supplementation, which emerges as a possible preventive strategy for different neurological conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.25978DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6152478PMC
August 2018

Nutritional Guidelines and Fermented Food Frameworks.

Foods 2017 Aug 7;6(8). Epub 2017 Aug 7.

Associação para o Desenvolvimento das Ciências Veterinárias (ACIVET), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Lisbon University, 1300-477 Lisboa, Portugal.

This review examines different nutritional guidelines, some case studies, and provides insights and discrepancies, in the regulatory framework of Food Safety Management of some of the world's economies. There are thousands of fermented foods and beverages, although the intention was not to review them but check their traditional and cultural value, and if they are still lacking to be classed as a category on different national food guides. For understanding the inconsistencies in claims of concerning fermented foods among various regulatory systems, each legal system should be considered unique. Fermented foods and beverages have long been a part of the human diet, and with further supplementation of probiotic microbes, in some cases, they offer nutritional and health attributes worthy of recommendation of regular consumption. Despite the impact of fermented foods and beverages on gastro-intestinal wellbeing and diseases, their many health benefits or recommended consumption has not been widely translated to global inclusion in world food guidelines. In general, the approach of the legal systems is broadly consistent and their structures may be presented under different formats. African traditional fermented products are briefly mentioned enhancing some recorded adverse effects. Knowing the general benefits of traditional and supplemented fermented foods, they should be a daily item on most national food guides.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/foods6080065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5575640PMC
August 2017

A safety assessment of Coriolus versicolor biomass as a food supplement.

Food Nutr Res 2016 10;60:29953. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

Ministry of Education, Maputo, Mozambique.

Background: Coriolus versicolor (CV) is a common mushroom with antitumor, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiviral, antibacterial, and immunomodulatory properties. The existence of these properties has been extensively proven mainly using CV extract; research on the biomass form is scarce.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of the CV biomass form, as it is commonly used as a food supplement.

Design: CV biomass powder was dissolved in distilled water and administered daily (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 g/kg live weight) in single doses by gavage to both female and male Charles River albino rats.

Results: No adverse or lethal effects were observed as a consequence of the daily administration of CV biomass. In addition, compared with the control group, no abnormal findings were observed at necropsy and histopathological examination.

Conclusions: A safe profile of CV biomass for human consumption can be inferred from the absence of any remarkable adverse effects in rats.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4788765PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/fnr.v60.29953DOI Listing
March 2016

Community oriented interprofessional health education in Mozambique: one student/one family program.

Educ Health (Abingdon) 2014 Jan-Apr;27(1):103-5

Research Director, Lúrio University, Nampula, Mozambique.

Background: In the remote northern region of Mozambique the ratio of doctors to patients is 1:50,000. In 2007, Lúrio University initiated an innovative, "One Student/One Family" program of teaching and learning for health professions students, to complement their traditional core curriculum. All students of each of the school's six health degree programs complete a curriculum in "Family and Community Health" in each year of their training.

Methods: Groups of six students from six different health professions training programs make weekly visits to communities, where each student is allocated to a family. Students learn from their families about community life and health issues, within a community where 80% of the population still lacks access to modern health care and rely on indigenous doctors and traditional remedies. In turn, students transmit information to families about modern health care and report to the faculty any major health problems they find. The educational/experiential approach is interprofessional and community-oriented.

Results: The main perceived advantages of the program are that it is applied and problem-based learning for students, while simultaneously providing needed healthcare services to the community. The major disadvantages include the complexity of coordinating multidisciplinary groups, the time and distance required of students in traveling to communities, and interpretation of multiple reports with variable data.

Discussion: This community-oriented education program involving students from six disciplines uses nontraditional teaching/learning methods is the basis of the ex libris of Lúrio University.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1357-6283.134362DOI Listing
April 2015

Myositis ossificans traumatica of the medial pterygoid muscle: a case report.

J Oral Sci 2010 Sep;52(3):485-9

Master's Program in Oral Biopathology, Radiology Area of São Paulo State University, São José dos Campos, SP, Brazil.

In this report, we present a case of myositis ossificans traumatica (MOT) of the medial pterygoid muscle that had developed after mandibular block anesthesia administered for endodontic treatment of the lower right second molar, demonstrating typical features of this condition. MOT should be considered as a differential diagnosis when there is severe limitation of jaw opening and an associated trauma. Panoramic radiographs and axial and coronal computed tomography (CT) scans can effectively delineate the calcified mass. Other imaging studies that may be helpful include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bone scans, and ultrasound. As shown in our case, calcified masses were found in the right mandibular angle, which severely limited jaw opening. Some earlier reported cases of MOT were treated by extraoral surgical approaches with complete removal of the evolving muscle. The aim of this case report is to present only the diagnostic imaging aspects of myositis ossificans traumatica.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2334/josnusd.52.485DOI Listing
September 2010

European veterinary education: a bridge to quality.

Authors:
Tito H Fernandes

Vet J 2005 Mar;169(2):210-5

CIISA, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Alto da Ajuda, Rua Prof Cid dos Santos, 1300-477 Lisboa, Portugal.

The aim of this review is to provide an insight into the current state of, and future changes in, veterinary education within the European Community, as well as the role of the European Association of Establishments for Veterinary Education (EAEVE) in evaluating and raising standards of education and training. It also describes the role of EAEVE in developing strategies for changes in the future. Veterinary schools have traditionally aimed at producing the omnicompetent veterinarian at graduation. Many have questioned whether this is possible, and a recent European Commission (EC) funded market survey has confirmed that this is indeed an impossible task and has identified the requirements of society within the European Union (EU) for veterinary services in the future. There is however a need to change the current 1978 European Directive. The current mechanisms which have been used by EAEVE to evaluate over 100 veterinary schools in Europe and their relationship with other systems of appraisal are described. The future of veterinary education within the context of higher education in Europe as part of the Bologna process and in relation to standards of veterinary education worldwide are discussed. Whilst the merits of standardisation of educational quality so that there can be mutual recognition of qualifications are supported, the need to preserve the strengths associated with the diversity of approaches and teaching methods is strongly advocated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2004.09.001DOI Listing
March 2005

An attempt to estimate students' workload.

J Vet Med Educ 2004 ;31(3):255-60

Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Berbecieva 60, 100 Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Following the recent introduction of the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) into several European university programs, a new interest has developed in determining students' workload. ECTS credits are numerical values describing the student workload required to complete course units; ECTS has the potential to facilitate comparison and create transparency between institutional curricula. ECTS credits are frequently listed alongside institutional credits in course outlines and module summaries. Measuring student workload has been difficult; to a large extent, estimates are based only upon anecdotal and casual information. To gather more systematic information, we asked students at the Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, to estimate the actual total workload they committed to fulfill their coursework obligations for specific subjects in the veterinary degree program by reporting their attendance at defined contact hours and their estimated time for outside study, including the time required for examinations and other activities. Students also reported the final grades they received for these subjects. The results show that certain courses require much more work than others, independent of credit unit assignment. Generally, the courses with more contact hours tend also to demand more independent work; the best predictor of both actual student workload and student success is the amount of contact time in which they participate. The data failed to show any strong connection between students' total workload and grades they received; rather, they showed some evidence that regular presence at contact hours was the most positive influence on grades. Less frequent presence at lectures tended to indicate less time spent on independent study. It was also found that pre-clinical and clinical courses tended to require more work from students than other, more general subjects. While the present study does not provide conclusive evidence, it does indicate the need for further inquiry into the nature of the relationship between teaching and learning in higher education and for evaluation of the benefits (or otherwise) of more "self-directed" study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/jvme.31.3.255DOI Listing
December 2004

General panorama of European veterinary education.

Authors:
Tito H Fernandes

J Vet Med Educ 2004 ;31(3):204-6

Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Alto da Ajuda, Rua Prof Cid dos Santos, 1300-77 Lisbon, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/jvme.31.3.204DOI Listing
December 2004