Publications by authors named "Tin Louie"

25 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The trans-ancestral genomic architecture of glycemic traits.

Nat Genet 2021 06 31;53(6):840-860. Epub 2021 May 31.

Department of Epidemiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Glycemic traits are used to diagnose and monitor type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic health. To date, most genetic studies of glycemic traits have focused on individuals of European ancestry. Here we aggregated genome-wide association studies comprising up to 281,416 individuals without diabetes (30% non-European ancestry) for whom fasting glucose, 2-h glucose after an oral glucose challenge, glycated hemoglobin and fasting insulin data were available. Trans-ancestry and single-ancestry meta-analyses identified 242 loci (99 novel; P < 5 × 10), 80% of which had no significant evidence of between-ancestry heterogeneity. Analyses restricted to individuals of European ancestry with equivalent sample size would have led to 24 fewer new loci. Compared with single-ancestry analyses, equivalent-sized trans-ancestry fine-mapping reduced the number of estimated variants in 99% credible sets by a median of 37.5%. Genomic-feature, gene-expression and gene-set analyses revealed distinct biological signatures for each trait, highlighting different underlying biological pathways. Our results increase our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology by using trans-ancestry studies for improved power and resolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-021-00852-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7610958PMC
June 2021

Multi-ethnic GWAS and meta-analysis of sleep quality identify MPP6 as a novel gene that functions in sleep center neurons.

Sleep 2021 03;44(3)

The Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.

Poor sleep quality can have harmful health consequences. Although many aspects of sleep are heritable, the understandings of genetic factors involved in its physiology remain limited. Here, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a multi-ethnic discovery cohort (n = 2868) and found two novel genome-wide loci on chromosomes 2 and 7 associated with global sleep quality. A meta-analysis in 12 independent cohorts (100 000 individuals) replicated the association on chromosome 7 between NPY and MPP6. While NPY is an important sleep gene, we tested for an independent functional role of MPP6. Expression data showed an association of this locus with both NPY and MPP6 mRNA levels in brain tissues. Moreover, knockdown of an orthologue of MPP6 in Drosophila melanogaster sleep center neurons resulted in decreased sleep duration. With convergent evidence, we describe a new locus impacting human variability in sleep quality through known NPY and novel MPP6 sleep genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsaa211DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7953222PMC
March 2021

GWAS of QRS duration identifies new loci specific to Hispanic/Latino populations.

PLoS One 2019 28;14(6):e0217796. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States of America.

Background: The electrocardiographically quantified QRS duration measures ventricular depolarization and conduction. QRS prolongation has been associated with poor heart failure prognosis and cardiovascular mortality, including sudden death. While previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 32 QRS SNPs across 26 loci among European, African, and Asian-descent populations, the genetics of QRS among Hispanics/Latinos has not been previously explored.

Methods: We performed a GWAS of QRS duration among Hispanic/Latino ancestry populations (n = 15,124) from four studies using 1000 Genomes imputed genotype data (adjusted for age, sex, global ancestry, clinical and study-specific covariates). Study-specific results were combined using fixed-effects, inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis.

Results: We identified six loci associated with QRS (P<5x10-8), including two novel loci: MYOCD, a nuclear protein expressed in the heart, and SYT1, an integral membrane protein. The top SNP in the MYOCD locus, intronic SNP rs16946539, was found in Hispanics/Latinos with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.04, but is monomorphic in European and African descent populations. The most significant QRS duration association was with intronic SNP rs3922344 (P = 1.19x10-24) in SCN5A/SCN10A. Three other previously identified loci, CDKN1A, VTI1A, and HAND1, also exceeded the GWAS significance threshold among Hispanics/Latinos. A total of 27 of 32 previously identified QRS duration SNPs were shown to generalize in Hispanics/Latinos.

Conclusions: Our QRS duration GWAS, the first in Hispanic/Latino populations, identified two new loci, underscoring the utility of extending large scale genomic studies to currently under-examined populations.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0217796PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6599128PMC
February 2020

A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Blood Disorder-Related Variants Influencing Hemoglobin A With Implications for Glycemic Status in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos.

Diabetes Care 2019 09 18;42(9):1784-1791. Epub 2019 Jun 18.

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY

Objective: We aimed to identify hemoglobin A (HbA)-associated genetic variants and examine their implications for glycemic status evaluated by HbA in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos with diverse genetic ancestries.

Research Design And Methods: We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of HbA in 9,636 U.S. Hispanics/Latinos without diabetes from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, followed by a replication among 4,729 U.S. Hispanics/Latinos from three independent studies.

Results: Our GWAS and replication analyses showed 10 previously known and novel loci associated with HbA at genome-wide significance levels ( < 5.0 × 10). In particular, two African ancestry-specific variants, rs334 and -rs1050828, which are causal mutations for sickle cell disease and deficiency, respectively, had ∼10 times larger effect sizes on HbA levels (β = -0.31% [-3.4 mmol/mol]) and -0.35% [-3.8 mmol/mol] per minor allele, respectively) compared with other HbA-associated variants (0.03-0.04% [0.3-0.4 mmol/mol] per allele). A novel Amerindian ancestry-specific variant, -rs145546625, was associated with HbA and hematologic traits but not with fasting glucose. The prevalence of hyperglycemia (prediabetes and diabetes) defined using fasting glucose or oral glucose tolerance test 2-h glucose was similar between carriers of rs334 or -rs1050828 HbA-lowering alleles and noncarriers, whereas the prevalence of hyperglycemia defined using HbA was significantly lower in carriers than in noncarriers (12.2% vs. 28.4%, < 0.001). After recalibration of the HbA level taking -rs334 and -rs1050828 into account, the prevalence of hyperglycemia in carriers was similar to noncarriers (31.3% vs. 28.4%, = 0.28).

Conclusions: This study in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos found several ancestry-specific alleles associated with HbA through erythrocyte-related rather than glycemic-related pathways. The potential influences of these nonglycemic-related variants need to be considered when the HbA test is performed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc19-0168DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6702612PMC
September 2019

A multi-ancestry genome-wide study incorporating gene-smoking interactions identifies multiple new loci for pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure.

Hum Mol Genet 2019 08;28(15):2615-2633

Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.

Elevated blood pressure (BP), a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, is influenced by both genetic and lifestyle factors. Cigarette smoking is one such lifestyle factor. Across five ancestries, we performed a genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) in 129 913 individuals in stage 1 and follow-up analysis in 480 178 additional individuals in stage 2. We report here 136 loci significantly associated with MAP and/or PP. Of these, 61 were previously published through main-effect analysis of BP traits, 37 were recently reported by us for systolic BP and/or diastolic BP through gene-smoking interaction analysis and 38 were newly identified (P < 5 × 10-8, false discovery rate < 0.05). We also identified nine new signals near known loci. Of the 136 loci, 8 showed significant interaction with smoking status. They include CSMD1 previously reported for insulin resistance and BP in the spontaneously hypertensive rats. Many of the 38 new loci show biologic plausibility for a role in BP regulation. SLC26A7 encodes a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger expressed in the renal outer medullary collecting duct. AVPR1A is widely expressed, including in vascular smooth muscle cells, kidney, myocardium and brain. FHAD1 is a long non-coding RNA overexpressed in heart failure. TMEM51 was associated with contractile function in cardiomyocytes. CASP9 plays a central role in cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Identified only in African ancestry were 30 novel loci. Our findings highlight the value of multi-ancestry investigations, particularly in studies of interaction with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences may contribute to novel findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddz070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6644157PMC
August 2019

Associations of variants In the hexokinase 1 and interleukin 18 receptor regions with oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep.

PLoS Genet 2019 04 16;15(4):e1007739. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States of America.

Sleep disordered breathing (SDB)-related overnight hypoxemia is associated with cardiometabolic disease and other comorbidities. Understanding the genetic bases for variations in nocturnal hypoxemia may help understand mechanisms influencing oxygenation and SDB-related mortality. We conducted genome-wide association tests across 10 cohorts and 4 populations to identify genetic variants associated with three correlated measures of overnight oxyhemoglobin saturation: average and minimum oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep and the percent of sleep with oxyhemoglobin saturation under 90%. The discovery sample consisted of 8,326 individuals. Variants with p < 1 × 10(-6) were analyzed in a replication group of 14,410 individuals. We identified 3 significantly associated regions, including 2 regions in multi-ethnic analyses (2q12, 10q22). SNPs in the 2q12 region associated with minimum SpO2 (rs78136548 p = 2.70 × 10(-10)). SNPs at 10q22 were associated with all three traits including average SpO2 (rs72805692 p = 4.58 × 10(-8)). SNPs in both regions were associated in over 20,000 individuals and are supported by prior associations or functional evidence. Four additional significant regions were detected in secondary sex-stratified and combined discovery and replication analyses, including a region overlapping Reelin, a known marker of respiratory complex neurons.These are the first genome-wide significant findings reported for oxyhemoglobin saturation during sleep, a phenotype of high clinical interest. Our replicated associations with HK1 and IL18R1 suggest that variants in inflammatory pathways, such as the biologically-plausible NLRP3 inflammasome, may contribute to nocturnal hypoxemia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1007739DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6467367PMC
April 2019

Multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of 387,272 individuals identifies new loci associated with serum lipids.

Nat Genet 2019 04 29;51(4):636-648. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Human Genomics Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.

The concentrations of high- and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are influenced by smoking, but it is unknown whether genetic associations with lipids may be modified by smoking. We conducted a multi-ancestry genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study in 133,805 individuals with follow-up in an additional 253,467 individuals. Combined meta-analyses identified 13 new loci associated with lipids, some of which were detected only because association differed by smoking status. Additionally, we demonstrate the importance of including diverse populations, particularly in studies of interactions with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences by ancestry may contribute to novel findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-019-0378-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6467258PMC
April 2019

Multiancestry Genome-Wide Association Study of Lipid Levels Incorporating Gene-Alcohol Interactions.

Am J Epidemiol 2019 06;188(6):1033-1054

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

A person's lipid profile is influenced by genetic variants and alcohol consumption, but the contribution of interactions between these exposures has not been studied. We therefore incorporated gene-alcohol interactions into a multiancestry genome-wide association study of levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. We included 45 studies in stage 1 (genome-wide discovery) and 66 studies in stage 2 (focused follow-up), for a total of 394,584 individuals from 5 ancestry groups. Analyses covered the period July 2014-November 2017. Genetic main effects and interaction effects were jointly assessed by means of a 2-degrees-of-freedom (df) test, and a 1-df test was used to assess the interaction effects alone. Variants at 495 loci were at least suggestively associated (P < 1 × 10-6) with lipid levels in stage 1 and were evaluated in stage 2, followed by combined analyses of stage 1 and stage 2. In the combined analysis of stages 1 and 2, a total of 147 independent loci were associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10-8 using 2-df tests, of which 18 were novel. No genome-wide-significant associations were found testing the interaction effect alone. The novel loci included several genes (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 5 (PCSK5), vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGFB), and apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide 1 (APOBEC1) complementation factor (A1CF)) that have a putative role in lipid metabolism on the basis of existing evidence from cellular and experimental models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwz005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6545280PMC
June 2019

Discovery of common and rare genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer.

Nat Genet 2019 01 3;51(1):76-87. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition (DIfE), Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.

To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P < 5 × 10, bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to ~100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Krüppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs and somatic drivers, and support a role for immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of biology underlying this risk and influence personalized screening strategies and drug development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0286-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6358437PMC
January 2019

Admixture mapping identifies novel loci for obstructive sleep apnea in Hispanic/Latino Americans.

Hum Mol Genet 2019 02;28(4):675-687

Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi, Jackson, MS, USA.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Its prevalence and severity vary across ancestral background. Although OSA traits are heritable, few genetic associations have been identified. To identify genetic regions associated with OSA and improve statistical power, we applied admixture mapping on three primary OSA traits [the apnea hypopnea index (AHI), overnight average oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO2) and percentage time SaO2 < 90%] and a secondary trait (respiratory event duration) in a Hispanic/Latino American population study of 11 575 individuals with significant variation in ancestral background. Linear mixed models were performed using previously inferred African, European and Amerindian local genetic ancestry markers. Global African ancestry was associated with a lower AHI, higher SaO2 and shorter event duration. Admixture mapping analysis of the primary OSA traits identified local African ancestry at the chromosomal region 2q37 as genome-wide significantly associated with AHI (P < 5.7 × 10-5), and European and Amerindian ancestries at 18q21 suggestively associated with both AHI and percentage time SaO2 < 90% (P < 10-3). Follow-up joint ancestry-SNP association analyses identified novel variants in ferrochelatase (FECH), significantly associated with AHI and percentage time SaO2 < 90% after adjusting for multiple tests (P < 8 × 10-6). These signals contributed to the admixture mapping associations and were replicated in independent cohorts. In this first admixture mapping study of OSA, novel associations with variants in the iron/heme metabolism pathway suggest a role for iron in influencing respiratory traits underlying OSA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddy387DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6360325PMC
February 2019

Novel genetic associations for blood pressure identified via gene-alcohol interaction in up to 570K individuals across multiple ancestries.

PLoS One 2018 18;13(6):e0198166. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Icelandic Heart Association, Kopavogur, Iceland.

Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for hypertension; the mechanism by which alcohol consumption impact blood pressure (BP) regulation remains unknown. We hypothesized that a genome-wide association study accounting for gene-alcohol consumption interaction for BP might identify additional BP loci and contribute to the understanding of alcohol-related BP regulation. We conducted a large two-stage investigation incorporating joint testing of main genetic effects and single nucleotide variant (SNV)-alcohol consumption interactions. In Stage 1, genome-wide discovery meta-analyses in ≈131K individuals across several ancestry groups yielded 3,514 SNVs (245 loci) with suggestive evidence of association (P < 1.0 x 10-5). In Stage 2, these SNVs were tested for independent external replication in ≈440K individuals across multiple ancestries. We identified and replicated (at Bonferroni correction threshold) five novel BP loci (380 SNVs in 21 genes) and 49 previously reported BP loci (2,159 SNVs in 109 genes) in European ancestry, and in multi-ancestry meta-analyses (P < 5.0 x 10-8). For African ancestry samples, we detected 18 potentially novel BP loci (P < 5.0 x 10-8) in Stage 1 that warrant further replication. Additionally, correlated meta-analysis identified eight novel BP loci (11 genes). Several genes in these loci (e.g., PINX1, GATA4, BLK, FTO and GABBR2) have been previously reported to be associated with alcohol consumption. These findings provide insights into the role of alcohol consumption in the genetic architecture of hypertension.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0198166PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6005576PMC
January 2019

A Large-Scale Multi-ancestry Genome-wide Study Accounting for Smoking Behavior Identifies Multiple Significant Loci for Blood Pressure.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 03 15;102(3):375-400. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Health Disparities Research Section, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.

Genome-wide association analysis advanced understanding of blood pressure (BP), a major risk factor for vascular conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Accounting for smoking behavior may help identify BP loci and extend our knowledge of its genetic architecture. We performed genome-wide association meta-analyses of systolic and diastolic BP incorporating gene-smoking interactions in 610,091 individuals. Stage 1 analysis examined ∼18.8 million SNPs and small insertion/deletion variants in 129,913 individuals from four ancestries (European, African, Asian, and Hispanic) with follow-up analysis of promising variants in 480,178 additional individuals from five ancestries. We identified 15 loci that were genome-wide significant (p < 5 × 10) in stage 1 and formally replicated in stage 2. A combined stage 1 and 2 meta-analysis identified 66 additional genome-wide significant loci (13, 35, and 18 loci in European, African, and trans-ancestry, respectively). A total of 56 known BP loci were also identified by our results (p < 5 × 10). Of the newly identified loci, ten showed significant interaction with smoking status, but none of them were replicated in stage 2. Several loci were identified in African ancestry, highlighting the importance of genetic studies in diverse populations. The identified loci show strong evidence for regulatory features and support shared pathophysiology with cardiometabolic and addiction traits. They also highlight a role in BP regulation for biological candidates such as modulators of vascular structure and function (CDKN1B, BCAR1-CFDP1, PXDN, EEA1), ciliopathies (SDCCAG8, RPGRIP1L), telomere maintenance (TNKS, PINX1, AKTIP), and central dopaminergic signaling (MSRA, EBF2).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.01.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5985266PMC
March 2018

Variation in Cilia Protein Genes and Progression of Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

Ann Am Thorac Soc 2018 04;15(4):440-448

2 Department of Biostatistics.

Rationale: Cystic fibrosis, like primary ciliary dyskinesia, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by abnormal mucociliary clearance and obstructive lung disease. We hypothesized that genes underlying the development or function of cilia may modify lung disease severity in persons with cystic fibrosis.

Objectives: To test this hypothesis, we compared variants in 93 candidate genes in both upper and lower tertiles of lung function in a large cohort of children and adults with cystic fibrosis with those of a population control dataset.

Methods: Variants within candidate genes were tested for association using the SKAT-O test, comparing cystic fibrosis cases defined by poor (n = 127) or preserved (n = 127) lung function with population controls (n = 3,269 or 3,148, respectively). Associated variants were then tested for association with related phenotypes in independent datasets.

Results: Variants in DNAH14 and DNAAF3 were associated with poor lung function in cystic fibrosis, whereas variants in DNAH14 and DNAH6 were associated with preserved lung function in cystic fibrosis. Associations between DNAH14 and lung function were replicated in disease-related phenotypes characterized by obstructive lung disease in adults.

Conclusions: Genetic variants within DNAH6, DNAH14, and DNAAF3 are associated with variation in lung function among persons with cystic fibrosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201706-451OCDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5879139PMC
April 2018

The Epithelial Sodium Channel Is a Modifier of the Long-Term Nonprogressive Phenotype Associated with F508del CFTR Mutations.

Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 2017 12;57(6):711-720

4 Pulmonary and Respiratory Diseases, and.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) remains the most lethal genetic disease in the Caucasian population. However, there is great variability in clinical phenotypes and survival times, even among patients harboring the same genotype. We identified five patients with CF and a homozygous F508del mutation in the CFTR gene who were in their fifth or sixth decade of life and had shown minimal changes in lung function over a longitudinal period of more than 20 years. Because of the rarity of this long-term nonprogressive phenotype, we hypothesized these individuals may carry rare genetic variants in modifier genes that ameliorate disease severity. Individuals at the extremes of survival time and lung-function trajectory underwent whole-exome sequencing, and the sequencing data were filtered to include rare missense, stopgain, indel, and splicing variants present with a mean allele frequency of <0.2% in general population databases. Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) mutants were generated via site-directed mutagenesis and expressed for Xenopus oocyte assays. Four of the five individuals carried extremely rare or never reported variants in the SCNN1D and SCNN1B genes of the ENaC. Separately, an independently enriched rare variant in SCNN1D was identified in the Exome Variant Server database associated with a milder pulmonary disease phenotype. Functional analysis using Xenopus oocytes revealed that two of the three variants in δ-ENaC encoded by SCNN1D exhibited hypomorphic channel activity. Our data suggest a potential role for δ-ENaC in controlling sodium reabsorption in the airways, and advance the plausibility of ENaC as a therapeutic target in CF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1165/rcmb.2017-0166OCDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5765421PMC
December 2017

Genome-Wide Association Study of Heavy Smoking and Daily/Nondaily Smoking in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

Nicotine Tob Res 2018 03;20(4):448-457

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

Introduction: Genetic variants associated with nicotine dependence have previously been identified, primarily in European-ancestry populations. No genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been reported for smoking behaviors in Hispanics/Latinos in the United States and Latin America, who are of mixed ancestry with European, African, and American Indigenous components.

Methods: We examined genetic associations with smoking behaviors in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) (N = 12 741 with smoking data, 5119 ever-smokers), using ~2.3 million genotyped variants imputed to the 1000 Genomes Project phase 3. Mixed logistic regression models accounted for population structure, sampling, relatedness, sex, and age.

Results: The known region of CHRNA5, which encodes the α5 cholinergic nicotinic receptor subunit, was associated with heavy smoking at genome-wide significance (p ≤ 5 × 10-8) in a comparison of 1929 ever-smokers reporting cigarettes per day (CPD) > 10 versus 3156 reporting CPD ≤ 10. The functional variant rs16969968 in CHRNA5 had a p value of 2.20 × 10-7 and odds ratio (OR) of 1.32 for the minor allele (A); its minor allele frequency was 0.22 overall and similar across Hispanic/Latino background groups (Central American = 0.17; South American = 0.19; Mexican = 0.18; Puerto Rican = 0.22; Cuban = 0.29; Dominican = 0.19). CHRNA4 on chromosome 20 attained p < 10-4, supporting prior findings in non-Hispanics. For nondaily smoking, which is prevalent in Hispanic/Latino smokers, compared to daily smoking, loci on chromosomes 2 and 4 achieved genome-wide significance; replication attempts were limited by small Hispanic/Latino sample sizes.

Conclusions: Associations of nicotinic receptor gene variants with smoking, first reported in non-Hispanic European-ancestry populations, generalized to Hispanics/Latinos despite different patterns of smoking behavior.

Implications: We conducted the first large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) of smoking behavior in a US Hispanic/Latino cohort, and the first GWAS of daily/nondaily smoking in any population. Results show that the region of the nicotinic receptor subunit gene CHRNA5, which in non-Hispanic European-ancestry smokers has been associated with heavy smoking as well as cessation and treatment efficacy, is also significantly associated with heavy smoking in this Hispanic/Latino cohort. The results are an important addition to understanding the impact of genetic variants in understudied Hispanic/Latino smokers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntx107DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5896462PMC
March 2018

Genome-wide association study of iron traits and relation to diabetes in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL): potential genomic intersection of iron and glucose regulation?

Hum Mol Genet 2017 05;26(10):1966-1978

Institute for Translational Genomics and Population Sciences, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, and Department of Pediatrics, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90502, and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Genetic variants contribute to normal variation of iron-related traits and may also cause clinical syndromes of iron deficiency or excess. Iron overload and deficiency can adversely affect human health. For example, elevated iron storage is associated with increased diabetes risk, although mechanisms are still being investigated. We conducted the first genome-wide association study of serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation, and ferritin in a Hispanic/Latino cohort, the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (>12 000 participants) and also assessed the generalization of previously known loci to this population. We then evaluated whether iron-associated variants were associated with diabetes and glycemic traits. We found evidence for a novel association between TIBC and a variant near the gene for protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 3B (PPP1R3B; rs4841132, β = -0.116, P = 7.44 × 10-8). The effect strengthened when iron deficient individuals were excluded (β = -0.121, P = 4.78 × 10-9). Ten of sixteen variants previously associated with iron traits generalized to HCHS/SOL, including variants at the transferrin (TF), hemochromatosis (HFE), fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS2)/myelin regulatory factor (MYRF), transmembrane protease, serine 6 (TMPRSS6), transferrin receptor (TFR2), N-acetyltransferase 2 (arylamine N-acetyltransferase) (NAT2), ABO blood group (ABO), and GRB2 associated binding protein 3 (GAB3) loci. In examining iron variant associations with glucose homeostasis, an iron-raising variant of TMPRSS6 was associated with lower HbA1c levels (P = 8.66 × 10-10). This association was attenuated upon adjustment for iron measures. In contrast, the iron-raising allele of PPP1R3B was associated with higher levels of fasting glucose (P = 7.70 × 10-7) and fasting insulin (P = 4.79 × 10-6), but these associations were not attenuated upon adjustment for TIBC-so iron is not likely a mediator. These results provide new genetic information on iron traits and their connection with glucose homeostasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddx082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6075359PMC
May 2017

Genetic variation near IRS1 is associated with adiposity and a favorable metabolic profile in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos.

Obesity (Silver Spring) 2016 11 24;24(11):2407-2413. Epub 2016 Sep 24.

Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.

Objective: Associations of IRS1 genetic variation with adiposity and metabolic profile in U.S. Hispanic/Latino individuals of diverse backgrounds were examined.

Methods: Previously genome-wide association study-identified IRS1 variants (rs2943650, rs2972146, rs2943641, and rs2943634) as related to body fat percentage (BF%) and multiple metabolic traits were tested among up to 12,730 adults (5,232 men; 7,515 women) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

Results: The C-allele (frequency = 26%) of rs2943650 was significantly associated with higher BF% overall (β = 0.34 ± 0.11% per allele; P = 0.002) and in women (β = 0.41 ± 0.14% per C-allele; P = 0.003), but not in men (β = 0.28 ± 0.18% per C-allele; P = 0.11), though there was no significant sex difference. Using the inverse normal-transformed data to compare effect sizes, it was found that the association with BF% was stronger in Hispanic/Latino women than that previously reported in European women (β = 0.054 ± 0.018SD vs. β = 0.008 ± 0.011SD per C-allele; P = 0.03). The BF%-increasing allele of rs2943650 was significantly associated with lower levels of fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, hemoglobin A1c, and triglycerides and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: This study confirmed and extended previous findings of IRS1 variation associated with increased adiposity but a favorable metabolic profile in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos, with a relatively stronger genetic effect on BF% in Hispanic/Latino women compared with European women.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.21624DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5093062PMC
November 2016

Identification of Rare Variants in ATP8B4 as a Risk Factor for Systemic Sclerosis by Whole-Exome Sequencing.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2016 Jan;68(1):191-200

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Objective: To determine the contribution of rare variants as genetic modifiers of the expressivity, penetrance, and severity of systemic sclerosis (SSc).

Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing of 78 European American patients with SSc, including 35 patients without pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and 43 patients with PAH. Association testing of case-control probability for rare variants was performed using the unified sequence kernel association test with optimal kernel weighting and small sample adjustment by comparing all SSc patients with a reference population of 3,179 controls from the Exome Sequencing Project 5,500 exome data set. Replication genotyping was performed in an independent sample of 3,263 patients (415 patients with SSc and 2,848 controls). We conducted expression profiling of messenger RNA from 61 SSc patients (19 without PAH and 42 with PAH) and 41 corresponding controls.

Results: The ATP8B4 gene was associated with a significant increase in the risk of SSc (P = 2.77 × 10(-7)). Among the 64 ATP8B4 variants tested, a single missense variant, c.1308C>G (F436L, rs55687265), provided the most compelling evidence of association (P = 9.35 × 10(-10), odds ratio [OR] 6.11), which was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.012, OR 1.86) and meta-analysis (P = 1.92 × 10(-7), OR 2.5). Genes involved in E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex (ASB10) and cyclic nucleotide gated channelopathies (CNGB3) as well as HLA-DRB5 and HSPB2 (heat-shock protein 27) provided additional evidence of association (P < 10(-5)). Differential ATP8B4 expression was observed among the SSc patients compared to the controls (P = 0.0005).

Conclusion: ATP8B4 may represent a putative genetic risk factor for SSc and pulmonary vascular complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.39449DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4690763PMC
January 2016

Exome Sequencing of Phenotypic Extremes Identifies CAV2 and TMC6 as Interacting Modifiers of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Cystic Fibrosis.

PLoS Genet 2015 Jun 5;11(6):e1005273. Epub 2015 Jun 5.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America; Division of Genetic Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

Discovery of rare or low frequency variants in exome or genome data that are associated with complex traits often will require use of very large sample sizes to achieve adequate statistical power. For a fixed sample size, sequencing of individuals sampled from the tails of a phenotype distribution (i.e., extreme phenotypes design) maximizes power and this approach was recently validated empirically with the discovery of variants in DCTN4 that influence the natural history of P. aeruginosa airway infection in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF; MIM219700). The increasing availability of large exome/genome sequence datasets that serve as proxies for population-based controls affords the opportunity to test an alternative, potentially more powerful and generalizable strategy, in which the frequency of rare variants in a single extreme phenotypic group is compared to a control group (i.e., extreme phenotype vs. control population design). As proof-of-principle, we applied this approach to search for variants associated with risk for age-of-onset of chronic P. aeruginosa airway infection among individuals with CF and identified variants in CAV2 and TMC6 that were significantly associated with group status. These results were validated using a large, prospective, longitudinal CF cohort and confirmed a significant association of a variant in CAV2 with increased age-of-onset of P. aeruginosa airway infection (hazard ratio = 0.48, 95% CI=[0.32, 0.88]) and variants in TMC6 with diminished age-of-onset of P. aeruginosa airway infection (HR = 5.4, 95% CI=[2.2, 13.5]) A strong interaction between CAV2 and TMC6 variants was observed (HR=12.1, 95% CI=[3.8, 39]) for children with the deleterious TMC6 variant and without the CAV2 protective variant. Neither gene showed a significant association using an extreme phenotypes design, and conditions for which the power of an extreme phenotype vs. control population design was greater than that for the extreme phenotypes design were explored.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1005273DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4457883PMC
June 2015

Exome sequencing in HFE C282Y homozygous men with extreme phenotypes identifies a GNPAT variant associated with severe iron overload.

Hepatology 2015 Aug 18;62(2):429-39. Epub 2015 Mar 18.

Department of Veterans Affairs Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA.

Unlabelled: To identify polymorphisms associated with variability of iron overload severity in HFE-associated hemochromatosis, we performed exome sequencing of DNA from 35 male HFE C282Y homozygotes with either markedly increased iron stores (n = 22; cases) or with normal or mildly increased iron stores (n = 13; controls). The 35 participants, residents of the United States, Canada, and Australia, reported no or light alcohol consumption. Sequencing data included 82,068 single-nucleotide variants, and 10,337 genes were tested for a difference between cases and controls. A variant in the GNPAT gene showed the most significant association with severe iron overload (P = 3 × 10(-6) ; P = 0.033 by the likelihood ratio test after correction for multiple comparisons). Sixteen of twenty-two participants with severe iron overload had glyceronephosphate O-acyltransferase (GNPAT) polymorphism p.D519G (rs11558492; 15 heterozygotes, one homozygote). No control participant had this polymorphism. To examine functional consequences of GNPAT deficiency, we performed small interfering RNA-based knockdown of GNPAT in the human liver-derived cell line, HepG2/C3A. This knockdown resulted in a >17-fold decrease in expression of the messenger RNA encoding the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin.

Conclusion: GNPAT p.D519G is associated with a high-iron phenotype in HFE C282Y homozygotes and may participate in hepcidin regulation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hep.27711DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4508230PMC
August 2015

Exome sequencing of extreme phenotypes identifies DCTN4 as a modifier of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis.

Nat Genet 2012 Jul 8;44(8):886-9. Epub 2012 Jul 8.

Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Exome sequencing has become a powerful and effective strategy for the discovery of genes underlying Mendelian disorders. However, use of exome sequencing to identify variants associated with complex traits has been more challenging, partly because the sample sizes needed for adequate power may be very large. One strategy to increase efficiency is to sequence individuals who are at both ends of a phenotype distribution (those with extreme phenotypes). Because the frequency of alleles that contribute to the trait are enriched in one or both phenotype extremes, a modest sample size can potentially be used to identify novel candidate genes and/or alleles. As part of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project (ESP), we used an extreme phenotype study design to discover that variants in DCTN4, encoding a dynactin protein, are associated with time to first P. aeruginosa airway infection, chronic P. aeruginosa infection and mucoid P. aeruginosa in individuals with cystic fibrosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.2344DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3702264PMC
July 2012

Hepatitis C virus infection and the prevalence of renal insufficiency.

Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2007 Jul 30;2(4):715-21. Epub 2007 May 30.

Health Services Research and Development Northwest Center of Excellence, Seattle, WA 98108, USA.

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with pathologic changes in the kidney. However, the association between HCV and renal dysfunction is not well defined.

Design, Setting, Participants, And Measurements: This study estimated the prevalence of renal insufficiency among veterans who received care through the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System. The study population consisted of veterans who underwent HCV antibody testing between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2004, and had at least one primary care or medical subspecialty visit and at least one outpatient creatinine measurement within the 18 mo before antibody testing. Veterans were excluded when they had a history of chronic dialysis, creatinine >5 mg/dl, or renal transplantation. Study data were extracted from the electronic medical record. Renal insufficiency was defined as a creatinine level > or =1.5 mg/dl. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to estimate the risk for renal insufficiency associated with HCV. Among 25,782 eligible veterans, 1928 were HCV antibody positive and 23,854 were HCV antibody negative.

Results: Although the proportion with renal insufficiency was lower for antibody-positive versus -negative veterans (4.8 versus 6.0%), after adjustment for age, race, gender, diabetes, and hypertension, HCV-positive veterans had a 40% higher odds for renal insufficiency (odds ratio 1.40; 95% confidence interval 1.11 to 1.76) as compared with HCV-negative veterans.

Conclusions: HCV was associated with an increased prevalence of renal insufficiency.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2215/CJN.00470107DOI Listing
July 2007

The genome of the kinetoplastid parasite, Leishmania major.

Science 2005 Jul;309(5733):436-42

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK.

Leishmania species cause a spectrum of human diseases in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. We have sequenced the 36 chromosomes of the 32.8-megabase haploid genome of Leishmania major (Friedlin strain) and predict 911 RNA genes, 39 pseudogenes, and 8272 protein-coding genes, of which 36% can be ascribed a putative function. These include genes involved in host-pathogen interactions, such as proteolytic enzymes, and extensive machinery for synthesis of complex surface glycoconjugates. The organization of protein-coding genes into long, strand-specific, polycistronic clusters and lack of general transcription factors in the L. major, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi (Tritryp) genomes suggest that the mechanisms regulating RNA polymerase II-directed transcription are distinct from those operating in other eukaryotes, although the trypanosomatids appear capable of chromatin remodeling. Abundant RNA-binding proteins are encoded in the Tritryp genomes, consistent with active posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1112680DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1470643PMC
July 2005

The genome sequence of Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas disease.

Science 2005 Jul;309(5733):409-15

Department of Parasite Genomics, Institute for Genomic Research, Rockville, MD 20850, USA.

Whole-genome sequencing of the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi revealed that the diploid genome contains a predicted 22,570 proteins encoded by genes, of which 12,570 represent allelic pairs. Over 50% of the genome consists of repeated sequences, such as retrotransposons and genes for large families of surface molecules, which include trans-sialidases, mucins, gp63s, and a large novel family (>1300 copies) of mucin-associated surface protein (MASP) genes. Analyses of the T. cruzi, T. brucei, and Leishmania major (Tritryp) genomes imply differences from other eukaryotes in DNA repair and initiation of replication and reflect their unusual mitochondrial DNA. Although the Tritryp lack several classes of signaling molecules, their kinomes contain a large and diverse set of protein kinases and phosphatases; their size and diversity imply previously unknown interactions and regulatory processes, which may be targets for intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1112631DOI Listing
July 2005
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