Publications by authors named "Tiina Ader"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Severe Neurological Sequelae after a Recreational Dose of LSD.

J Anal Toxicol 2020 Oct 8. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.

A young man with an unremarkable medical history suffered a seizure with subsequent cardiorespiratory arrest and severe neurological sequelae after ingesting a blotter. Analysis of a similar blotter and a serum sample obtained 3 hours after the event detected lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) at the amount of 300 μg in the blotter and at a concentration of 4.0 ng/mL (12.4 nmoles/L) in serum. No other drugs were present in concentrations which may confer significant effects. In addition, no individual traits which would make the patient particularly susceptible to adverse LSD effects have subsequently been identified. This suggests that LSD may confer toxic effects in previously healthy individuals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jat/bkaa145DOI Listing
October 2020

Mortality and One-Year Functional Outcome in Elderly and Very Old Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries: Observed and Predicted.

Behav Neurol 2015 24;2015:845491. Epub 2015 Nov 24.

Faculty of Health Sciences, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromso, Norway ; Department of Rehabilitation, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromso, Norway.

The aim of the present study was to evaluate mortality and functional outcome in old and very old patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and compare to the predicted outcome according to the internet based CRASH (Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head injury) model based prediction, from the Medical Research Council (MRC). Methods. Prospective, national multicenter study including patients with severe TBI ≥ 65 years. Predicted mortality and outcome were calculated based on clinical information (CRASH basic) (age, GCS score, and pupil reactivity to light), as well as with additional CT findings (CRASH CT). Observed 14-day mortality and favorable/unfavorable outcome according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at one year was compared to the predicted outcome according to the CRASH models. Results. 97 patients, mean age 75 (SD 7) years, 64% men, were included. Two patients were lost to follow-up; 48 died within 14 days. The predicted versus the observed odds ratio (OR) for mortality was 2.65. Unfavorable outcome (GOSE < 5) was observed at one year follow-up in 72% of patients. The CRASH models predicted unfavorable outcome in all patients. Conclusion. The CRASH model overestimated mortality and unfavorable outcome in old and very old Norwegian patients with severe TBI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/845491DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4672101PMC
April 2016

Functional Recovery and Life Satisfaction in the First Year After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Multicenter Study of a Norwegian National Cohort.

J Head Trauma Rehabil 2015 Jul-Aug;30(4):E38-49

Department of Rehabilitation, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromso, Norway (Drs Anke and Manskow); Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromso, Norway (Dr Anke); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway (Drs Andelic and Røe); Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway (Dr Skandsen); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway (Dr Skandsen); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sorlandet Hospital, Kristiansand, Norway (Dr Knoph); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway (Dr Ader); Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health and Care Sciences, University of Tromso, Norway (Dr Manskow); Department of Research, Sunnaas Rehabilitation Hospital, Nesoddtangen, Norway (Dr Sigurdardottir); and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway (Dr Røe).

Objectives: (1) To examine the impact of demographic and acute injury-related variables on functional recovery and life satisfaction after severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) and (2) to test whether postinjury functioning, postconcussive symptoms, emotional state, and functional improvement are related to life satisfaction.

Design: Prospective national multicenter study.

Setting: Level 1 trauma centers in Norway.

Participants: 163 adults with sTBI.

Main Measures: Functional recovery between 3 and 12 months postinjury measured with Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended, Rivermead Postconcussion Symptoms Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and satisfaction with life situation.

Results: 60% of cases experienced functional improvement from 3 to 12 months postinjury. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that discharge to a rehabilitation department from acute care (odds ratio [OR] = 2.14; P < .05) and fewer days with artificial ventilation (OR = 1.04; P < .05) were significantly related to improvement. At 12 months postinjury, 85% were independent in daily activities. Most participants (63%) were satisfied with their life situation. Regression analysis revealed that older age (>65 years), low education, better functional outcome, and the absence of depressive and postconcussion symptoms were significant (P < .05) predictors of life satisfaction. Functional improvement was significantly associated with emotional state but not to life satisfaction.

Conclusion: Following sTBI, approximately two-thirds of survivors improve between 3 and 12 months postinjury and are satisfied with their life. Direct discharge from acute care to specialized rehabilitation appears to increase functional recovery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/HTR.0000000000000080DOI Listing
April 2016

Severe traumatic brain injury in Norway: impact of age on outcome.

J Rehabil Med 2013 Sep;45(8):734-40

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oslo University Hospital, Ulleval, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of age on mortality and 3-month outcome in a Norwegian cohort of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Methods: Norwegian residents ≥ 16 years of age who were admitted with a severe TBI to the country's 4 major trauma centres in 2009 and 2010 were included, as were adults (16- 64 years) and elderly patients (≥ 65 years).

Results: Half of the adult subjects and 84% of the elderly subjects were injured by falls. One-third of the adults and half of the elderly subjects were admitted to a local hospital before being transported to a regional trauma hospital. Subdural haematomas were more frequent in the elderly subjects. One-quarter of adults and two-thirds of the elderly subjects died within 3 months. At 3 months, 41% of the adult survivors were still in-patients, mainly in rehabilitation units (92%). Of the surviving elderly subjects, 14% were in-patients and none were in rehabilitation units. There was no difference in functional level for survivors at the 3-month follow-up.

Conclusion: Old age is associated with fall-induced severe TBI and high mortality rates. Less intensive treatment strategies were applied to elderly patients in the present study despite high rates of haemorrhage. Few surviving elderly patients received rehabilitation at 3 months post-injury.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-1198DOI Listing
September 2013