Publications by authors named "Tiia Tamme"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Management of maxillofacial trauma in the elderly: A European multicenter study.

Dent Traumatol 2020 Jun 9;36(3):241-246. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, University Medical Centre, Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Background/aims: Management of maxillofacial trauma in the geriatric population poses a great challenge due to anatomical variations and medical comorbidities. The aim of this study was to analyze the management variables, timing, and outcomes of facial fractures in elderly patients (aged 70 years or more) at several European departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Materials And Methods: This study was based on a systematic computer-assisted database that allowed the recording of data from all geriatric patients with facial fractures from the involved maxillofacial surgical units across Europe between 2013 and 2017.

Results: A total of 1334 patients were included in the study: 665 patients underwent closed or open surgical treatment. A significant association (P < .005) was found between the presence of concomitant injuries and a prolonged time between hospital admission and treatment. The absence of indications to treatment was associated with comorbidities and an older age (P < .000005).

Conclusions: Elderly patients require specific attention and multidisciplinary collaboration in the diagnosis and sequencing of trauma treatment. A prudent attitude may be kept in selected cases, especially when severe comorbidities are associated and function is not impaired.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/edt.12536DOI Listing
June 2020

Surgical management of unilateral body fractures of the edentulous atrophic mandible.

Oral Maxillofac Surg 2020 Mar 17;24(1):65-71. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.

Introduction: Management of body fractures in patients with edentulous atrophic mandibles represents a challenging task due to patient's age, medical comorbidities, poor bone quality, and vascularity, as well as reduced contact area between the fracture ends. The aim of the study was to assess the demographic and clinical variables, the surgical technique, and outcomes of unilateral body fractures of the edentulous atrophic mandible managed at several European departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Methods: This study is based on a systematic computer-assisted database that allowed the recording of data of all patients with fractures of the atrophic edentulous mandible from the involved maxillofacial surgical units across Europe between 2008 and 2017. The following data were recorded for each patient: gender, age, comorbidities, etiology, synchronous body injuries, degree of atrophy of the mandible according to Luhr classification, type of surgical approach and fixation, length of hospitalization, and presence and type of complications.

Results: A total of 43 patients were included in the study: 17 patients' mandibles were classified as class I according to Luhr, 15 as class II, and 11 as class III. All patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation by extraoral approach in 25 patients, intraoral in 15 patients, and mixed in 3 patients. A single 2.0 miniplate was used in 16 patients, followed by a single 2.4 reconstruction plate in 13 patients, by two 2.0 miniplates, and three 2.0 miniplates. Outcome was considered to be satisfying in 30 patients, with no complications. Complications were observed in 13 cases.

Conclusions: Treatment of unilateral body fractures of the edentulous mandible must still be based on the type of fracture, degree of atrophy, experience of the surgeon, and patients' preference. An adequate stability can be obtained by different plating techniques that have to be appropriately tailored to every single specific patient.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10006-019-00824-8DOI Listing
March 2020

The epidemiology of edentulous atrophic mandibular fractures in Europe.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2019 Dec 29;47(12):1929-1934. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.

Introduction: The objective of the present study was to assess the demographic variables, causes, and patterns of edentulous atrophic fractures of the mandible managed at several European departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The results of this multicenter collaboration over a 10-year period are presented.

Methods: The data of all patients with fractures of the atrophic edentulous mandible from the involved maxillofacial surgical units across Europe between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2017 were recorded: gender; age; voluptuary habits; comorbidities; etiology; fracture sites; synchronous body injuries; atrophy of the mandible according to Luhr classification; eventual type of treatment; timing of the eventual surgery; length of hospital stay.

Results: A total of 197 patients (86 male and 111 female patients) with 285 mandibular fractures were included in the study. Mean age of the study population was 75 years. Statistically significant associations were found between Luhr classes I - II and condylar fractures on one hand (p < .0005), and between Luhr class III and body and parasymphyseal fractures on the other hand (p < .05). Finally, 135 patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation, 56 patients did not undergo any intervention, and 6 patients underwent closed reduction. No statistically significant association was observed between treatment, timing of treatment, comorbidities, and concomitant injuries.

Conclusions: The management of edentulous atrophic mandibular fractures remains challenging. Treatment decisions should continue to be based on the clinician's previous experience and on the degree of bone resorption in edentulous mandible in relation to fracture subsites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2019.11.021DOI Listing
December 2019

Motor vehicle accidents-related maxillofacial injuries: a multicentre and prospective study.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2019 Sep 13;128(3):199-204. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Objectives: The purpose of this European multicenter prospective study was to obtain more precise information about the demographic characteristics and etiologic/epidemiologic patterns of motor vehicle accidents (MVA)-related maxillofacial fractures.

Study Design: Of the 3260 patients with maxillofacial fractures admitted within the study period, 326 traumas were caused by MVAs with a male/female ratio of 2.2:1.

Results: The maximum incidence was found in Zagreb (Croatia) (18%) and the minimum in Bergen (Norway) (0%). The most frequent mechanisms were car accidents, with 177 cases, followed by motorcycle accidents. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible, with 199 fractures, followed by maxillo-zygomatic-orbital (MZO) fractures.

Conclusions: In all the 3 groups (car, motorcycle, and pedestrian), mandibular and MZO fractures were the 2 most frequently observed fractures, with some variations. The importance of analyzing MVA-related facial injuries and their features and characteristics should be stressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2018.12.009DOI Listing
September 2019

The "European Mandibular Angle" research project: the analysis of complications after unilateral angle fractures.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2019 Jul 28;128(1):14-17. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the complications and outcomes of surgical treatment of angle fractures managed at departments of maxillofacial surgery in several European countries.

Study Design: Patients hospitalized with unilateral isolated angle fractures between 2013 and 2017 were included. The following data were recorded: gender and age of patients, fracture etiology, presence of the third molar, maxillomandibular fixation, osteosynthesis technique, and complications.

Results: In total, 489 patients were included in the study. The Champy technique was found to be the most frequently chosen osteosynthesis technique. Sixty complications were observed, at a rate of 12.3%. Complications were associated with the absence of third molars (P < .05). Instead, the Champy technique was associated with fewer complications (P < .05), in comparison with the other adopted techniques.

Conclusions: The management of angle fractures still represents a challenging task with a significant complication rate. The Champy technique still seems to be a valid option for the treatment of such injuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2019.02.027DOI Listing
July 2019

The "European zygomatic fracture" research project: The epidemiological results from a multicenter European collaboration.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2019 Apr 30;47(4):616-621. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Purpose: Fractures of the zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC) are common injuries that may lead to loss of an aesthetically pleasing appearance and functional impairment. The aim of this study was to analyze the demographics, causes, characteristics, and outcomes of zygomatic fractures managed at several European departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Materials And Methods: This study is based on a multicenter systematic database that allowed the recording of all patients with ZMC fractures between 1 January 2013 and 31 December 2017. The following data were recorded: gender, age, personal medical history, etiology, side of zygomatic fracture, classification of ZMC fracture, associated maxillofacial fractures, symptoms at diagnosis, type of performed treatment, and sequelae/complications.

Results: A total of 1406 patients (1172 males, 234 females) were included in the study. Statistically significant correlations were found between assault-related ZMC fractures and the A3 class (p < .0000005) and between Infraorbital Nerve (ION) anesthesia and B class (p < .00000005).

Conclusion: The most frequent cause of ZMC fractures was assault, followed by falls. The most frequently involved decade of age was between 20 and 29 years. The decision and type of surgical treatment of ZMC fractures depends on several issues that need to be considered on a case by case basis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2019.01.026DOI Listing
April 2019

The "European Mandibular Angle" Research Project: The Epidemiologic Results From a Multicenter European Collaboration.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2019 Apr 27;77(4):791.e1-791.e7. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Full Professor, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyze the demographic variables and causes and characteristics of mandibular angle fractures managed at several European departments of maxillofacial surgery.

Materials And Methods: This study was based on a multicenter systematic database that allowed the recording of data from all patients with mandibular angle fractures between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2017. The following data were recorded: gender, age, etiology, side of angle fracture, associated mandibular fractures, presence of third molar, intermaxillary fixation, and osteosynthesis.

Results: The study included 1,162 patients (1,045 male and 117 female patients). A significant association was found between the presence of a third molar and the diagnosis of an isolated angle fracture (P < .0000005). Furthermore, assaults were associated with the presence of voluptuary habits (P < .00005), a younger mean age (P < .00000005), male gender (P < .00000005), and left-sided angle fractures (P < .00000005).

Conclusions: Assaults and falls actually represent the most frequent causes of angle fractures. The presence of a third molar may let the force completely disperse during the determination of the angle fracture, finding a point of weakness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2018.12.013DOI Listing
April 2019

Saliva changes in Parkinson's disease patients after injection of Botulinum neurotoxin type A.

Neurol Sci 2018 May 19;39(5):871-877. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Tartu, Puusepa 8, 51014, Tartu, Estonia.

Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are compromised by poor oral condition due to oropharyngeal bradykinesia, dysphagia, and the side effects of treatment. Intrasalivary gland injections of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BNT-A) have been known to treat sialorrhea effectively in these patients. However, the decreased amount of saliva reduces self-cleaning ability that deteriorates oral hygiene and increases dental caries. The aim of this study was to determine the changes in the oral microflora and saliva in patients with PD treated for sialorrhea by means of sonography-controlled BNT-A injections into the bilateral parotid and submandibular glands. Altogether, 38 persons participated in the study: 12 PD patients who were injected with BNT-A for treatment of sialorrhea and passed salivary tests before and 1 month after the injections; and 13 PD patients and 13 healthy subjects who were not injected with BNT-A and passed salivary tests once. The condition of oral health was measured by the amount of saliva, salivary flow rate, and salivary composition. A good outcome with a significant decrease in salivary flow rate occurred at 1-month follow-up in the BNT-A-treated group while no significant change was found in salivary composition. BNT-A treatment did not change the Streptococcus mutans levels in saliva but there was statistically significant increase in levels of Lactobacilli. BNT-A injections can effectively treat sialorrhea while considering the change of oral microflora, and the patients should be under dentists' care more frequently. EudraCT clinical trial number: 2015-000682-30.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10072-018-3279-4DOI Listing
May 2018

Intramuscular botulinum toxin injection additional to arthrocentesis in the management of temporomandibular joint pain.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2016 Oct 24;122(4):e99-e106. Epub 2016 May 24.

Center of Prosthodontics, Clinic of Dentistry, Tartu University Hospital, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin (BTX-A) as an adjunct to arthrocentesis with the effect of BTX-A injections alone in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) with masticatory muscles tension.

Study Design: The clinical study included 20 TMD patients divided into 2 groups. The influence of daily activities on pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) area was evaluated in both groups using the rating scale by List and Helkimo. Range of maximal interincisial opening (MIO) and joint pain as measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS) were examined to determine the clinical efficiency of the procedures before and after treatment. Group A consisted of 12 patients; they were treated with arthrocentesis and BTX-A injections in the temporal and masseter muscles. Group B consisted of 8 patients; they had only BTX-A injections in the same muscles as mentioned.

Results: In group A, VAS decreased significantly (P = .005), and MIO improved significantly (P < .005).

Conclusions: Arthrocentesis with BTX-A seems to affect the clinical outcomes with regard to MIO and VAS compared with the results when BTX-A only was used. BTX-A in combination with arthrocentesis improved the TMJ area symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2016.05.008DOI Listing
October 2016

Does Botulinum neurotoxin type A treatment for sialorrhea change oral health?

Clin Oral Investig 2017 Apr 26;21(3):795-800. Epub 2016 Apr 26.

Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Tartu University Hospital, Puusepa 8, Tartu, 51014, Estonia.

Objectives: Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BNT-A) intrasalivary gland injections in patients with neurological disorders have been known to effectively treat hypersalivation. However, oral health can be compromised with increasing the dose. The aim of this study was to find out the therapeutic effect of low-dose, ultrasonography-controlled BNT-A injections into the bilateral parotid and submandibular glands on oral health in the treatment of sialorrhea.

Material And Methods: Twenty patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and other neurological disorders, including stroke or birth trauma, received BNT-A injections with salivary tests before and 1 month after the injections. Drooling was evaluated using subjective scales and objective assessment of salivary flow rate and oral health (salivary composition and cariogenic bacterial counts).

Results: A significant decrease was found in salivary flow rate at 1- and 3-month follow-up in the BNT-A treated group. There was no significant change in salivary composition or cariogenic bacterial counts.

Conclusion: BNT-A injections according to the current protocol can effectively manage sialorrhea while maintaining oral health.

Clinical Relevance: Oral health can be considered the mirror of general human health, as the cause of many diseases. Saliva plays a crucial role in protecting the oral cavity. The present study is of high clinical relevance because, although earlier research has proved the effect of Botulinum neurotoxin type A injections on reduction in saliva flow, data about the risks of the treatment method to the oral condition through affecting saliva composition has so far been missing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-016-1826-zDOI Listing
April 2017

European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) in children: a multicenter and prospective study.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2015 May 24;119(5):499-504. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

Department of Maxillofacial surgery, Stomatology Clinic, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.

Objective: The aim of this study is to present and discuss the results of a European multicentre prospective study about pediatric maxillofacial trauma epidemiology during a year.

Study Design: The following data were recorded: gender, age, etiology, site of fracture, date of injury. Of the 3396 patients with maxillofacial fractures admitted within the study period, 114 (3.3%) were children aged 15 years and younger, with a male/female ratio of 2.6:1. Mean age was 10.9 years. Most patients (63%) were aged 11-15 years.

Results: The most frequent cause of injury was fall (36 patients). Sport injuries and assaults were almost limited to the oldest group, whereas falls were more uniformly distributed in the 3 groups. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible with 47 fractures. In particular, 18 condylar fractures were recorded, followed by 12 body fractures.

Conclusions: Falls can be acknowledged as the most important cause of facial trauma during the first years of life. The high incidence of sport accidents after 10 years may be a reason to increase the use of mouthguards and other protective equipment. Finally, the mandible (and in particular the condyle) was confirmed as the most frequent fracture site.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2014.12.012DOI Listing
May 2015

Assault-related maxillofacial injuries: the results from the European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) multicenter and prospective collaboration.

Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol 2015 Apr 11;119(4):385-91. Epub 2014 Dec 11.

Department of Maxillofacial surgery, Stomatology Clinic, Tartu University, Tartu, Estonia.

Objective: The aim of this study is to present and discuss the demographic characteristics and patterns of assault-related maxillofacial fractures as reported by a European multicenter prospective study.

Study Design: Demographic and injury data were recorded for each patient who was a victim of an assault.

Results: Assaults represented the most frequent etiology of maxillofacial trauma with an overall rate of 39% and the values ranging between 60.8% (Kiev, Ukraine) and 15.4% (Bergen, Norway). The most frequent mechanisms of assault-related maxillofacial fractures were fists in 730 cases, followed by kicks and fists. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible (814 fractures), followed by orbito-zygomatic-maxillary complex fractures and orbital fractures.

Conclusions: Our data confirmed the strong possibility that patients with maxillofacial fractures may be victims of physical aggression. The crucial role of alcohol in assault-related fractures was also confirmed by our study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.oooo.2014.12.004DOI Listing
April 2015

European Maxillofacial Trauma (EURMAT) project: a multicentre and prospective study.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2015 Jan 22;43(1):62-70. Epub 2014 Oct 22.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The purpose of this study was to analyse the demographics, causes and characteristics of maxillofacial fractures managed at several European departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery over one year. The following data were recorded: gender, age, aetiology, site of facial fractures, facial injury severity score, timing of intervention, length of hospital stay. Data for a total of 3396 patients (2655 males and 741 females) with 4155 fractures were recorded. The mean age differed from country to country, ranging between 29.9 and 43.9 years. Overall, the most frequent cause of injury was assault, which accounted for the injuries of 1309 patients; assaults and falls alternated as the most important aetiological factor in the various centres. The most frequently observed fracture involved the mandible with 1743 fractures, followed by orbital-zygomatic-maxillary (OZM) fractures. Condylar fractures were the most commonly observed mandibular fracture. The results of the EURMAT collaboration confirm the changing trend in maxillofacial trauma epidemiology in Europe, with trauma cases caused by assaults and falls now outnumbering those due to road traffic accidents. The progressive ageing of the European population, in addition to strict road and work legislation may have been responsible for this change. Men are still the most frequent victims of maxillofacial injuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2014.10.011DOI Listing
January 2015

Use of the suture anchor in interpositional arthroplasty of temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

Oral Maxillofac Surg 2012 Mar 28;16(1):157-62. Epub 2011 Jun 28.

North Estonia Medical Centre, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Sütiste tee 19, 13419, Tallinn, Estonia.

Background: The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the use of a mini suture anchor to attach the temporal myofascial flap to the head of the mandibular condyle in interpositional arthroplasty for the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis.

Case Report: A 29-year-old patient, with unilateral posttraumatic temporomandibular joint osseous ankylosis and pre-operative maximal interincisal distance of 9 mm, was treated by the interpositional gap arthroplasty using the temporal myofascial flap. After rotation, the flap and the TMJ capsule were attached to the lateral pole of the condyle by a non-absorbable mini suture anchor. The surgery was uneventful. On the first post-operative day, the range of motion was considerably improved, with a maximal interincisal distance of 26 mm, a mandibular protrusion of 1 mm and a lateral mandibular excursion of 4 mm to the left and 7 mm to the right. On the 20th post-operative day, the maximal interincisal distance was 30 mm, protrusion 4 mm, the lateral excursion to the right 7 mm and to the left 5 mm. On the third post-operative month, the maximal interincisal distance reached 40 mm.

Discussion: The mini suture anchor demonstrated to be a good tool for the fixation of the temporalis myofascial flap to the condyle, also allowing with the same suture to attach the capsular tissue to the lateral surface of the condyle. The bone-anchored suture permits the restoration of a more physiologic TMJ anatomy. The treatment of TMJ ankylosis should be comprehensive; physiotherapy plays an important role in the rehabilitation period to restore the normal function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10006-011-0283-8DOI Listing
March 2012

The effect of prednisolone on reduction of complaints after impacted third molar removal.

Stomatologija 2010 ;12(1):17-22

Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Tartu University Hospital, Estonia.

Unlabelled: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and steroids are able to effectively reduce postoperative sequels after impacted third molar removal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a single dose of prednisolone, taken orally immediately after the operation, would increase the effects of etorikoxib (Arcoxia(R)) NSAID in preventing trismus and swelling after surgical removal of impacted third molars.

Patients And Methods: This prospective study was conducted in a half-year period on 78 patients who had undergone third molar surgery under local anaesthesia. They were divided into two groups: prednisolone group (38 patients) and control (40 patients). In the prednisolone group 30 mg prednisolone was given to each patient immediately after surgery. Both groups had received Etorikoxib 120 mg 30 minutes before operation. They had to complete a questionnaire evaluating postoperative symptoms. Postoperative pain, facial swelling and trismus were evaluated.

Results: Postoperative administration of 30 mg prednisolone to the patients relieved trismus, swelling and pain more than non-administration of prednisolone in the control group. There was significantly less swelling on the first four postoperative days in the prednisolone group compared to control (p<0.05). The values of the maximal interincisal opening (MIO) and visual analogue scale (VAS) were higher for the prednisolone group than for the control group (p<0.05). No clinically apparent infection, disturbance of wound healing, or other corticosteroid-related complications were noted.

Conclusion: It was found that a combination of a single dose of prednisolone and Etorikoxib is well-suited for treatment of postoperative pain, trismus, and swelling after third molar surgery and should be used to diminish postoperative swelling of soft tissues.
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June 2010

Sarcoidosis (Heerfordt syndrome): a case report.

Stomatologija 2007 ;9(2):61-4

Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Tartu University Hospital, 8 L.Puusepa Str. Tartu 51014, Estonia.

We report the case of a 22-year-old woman who is suspected of having primary Sjögren s syndrome. She complaining of bilateral swelling of eyelids and the parotid glands of three weeks duration. Physical examination revealed a bilateral enlargement of both parotid glands, which were solid and painful. Sjögren s syndrome was suspected at that stage, and the serologic and specific analysis were done. All these tests didn t find any autoimmune or visceral features typical of Sjögren s syndrome and autoantibodies were negative. During follow-up time the right facial nerve palsy developed. Pulmonary radiography revealed bihilar lymphadenopathy and labial salivary gland biopsy revealed non-caseating granuloma. The patient was classified as having stage I sarcoidosis. This case demonstrates the importance of being aware of the leading clinical signs and symptoms in case of Heerfordt syndrome.
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October 2007

Odontogenic tumours, a collaborative retrospective study of 75 cases covering more than 25 years from Estonia.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2004 Jun;32(3):161-5

Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Tartu, Tartu 51014, Estonia.

Introduction: The aim of the present collaborative study was to analyse retrospectively the character of odontogenic tumours in Estonia, involving the entire Estonian population (1.4 million), and to compare their prevalence with the figures presented in similar reports from other countries.

Material And Methods: All material for the retrospective study was retrieved from the files of the Departments of Maxillofacial Surgery in Tartu and Tallinn, Estonia, where all in/out-patients are treated from the whole country. The final diagnosis in each case of odontogenic tumour was based on the 1992 WHO histological criteria.

Results: A total of 75 odontogenic tumours was found, 74 (98.6%) of which were benign, and 1 (1.3%) was malignant. The frequency of odontogenic tumours in this study was the lowest ever reported. The most common tumours were odontoma (34.3%), followed by ameloblastoma with different subtypes (25.3%), ameloblastic fibroma (16%), odontogenic myxoma (12%) and benign cementoblastoma (8%).

Conclusion: Odontogenic tumours are relatively rare in Estonia compared with the data from other countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2003.12.004DOI Listing
June 2004

Mandibular ameloblastoma and maxillary adenoid cystic carcinoma: case report.

Ear Nose Throat J 2003 Dec;82(12):938-40

Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Tartu, 8 L. Puusepa St., Tartu 51014, Estonia.

We report the case of a 74-year-old woman who developed a follicular ameloblastoma of the right mandible and 22 months later developed a cribriform adenoid cystic carcinoma of the soft palate on the right maxilla. The ameloblastoma was treated by hemimandibulectomy, and the adenoid cystic carcinoma was managed by resection of the soft palate and the surrounding tissue and bone followed by a 6-week course of radiotherapy. Our review of the literature indicates that only one similar case has been previously reported where an odontogenic tumor and a salivary gland tumor involved two different anatomic locations in the same patient at nearly the same time.
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December 2003