Publications by authors named "Tiffany T Mayo"

9 Publications

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Pediatric Lichen Planopilaris Treated With Pioglitazone: A Case Study and Literature Review.

J Drugs Dermatol 2021 Jul;20(7):779-782

Importance: Pediatric lichen planopilaris (LPP) is a clinical variant of lichen planus (LP) that can lead to scarring hair loss without prompt intervention. While various therapies exist, intralesional and topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of treatment in pediatric LPP. Refractory cases may require systemic therapies, selection of which may prove challenging due to the lack of data regarding pediatric disease and effective treatment regimens. The objective of this case study is to present a new instance of pediatric LPP and identify all reported cases of pediatric LPP with an emphasis on treatment and response. J Drugs Dermatol. 2021;20(7):779-782. doi:10.36849/JDD.5729.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.36849/JDD.5729DOI Listing
July 2021

Common Cutaneous Infections: Patient Presentation, Clinical Course, and Treatment Options.

Med Clin North Am 2021 Jul;105(4):783-797

Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 510 20th Street South, FOT Suite 858, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA. Electronic address:

This evidence-based review highlights cutaneous infections of bacterial, viral, and fungal origin that are frequently encountered by clinicians in all fields of practice. With a focus on treatment options and management, the scope of this article is to serve as a reference for physicians, regardless of field of specialty, as they encounter these pathogens in clinical practice.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mcna.2021.04.012DOI Listing
July 2021

The art of prevention: It's too tight-Loosen up and let your hair down.

Int J Womens Dermatol 2021 Mar 29;7(2):174-179. Epub 2021 Jan 29.

Department of Dermatology, Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia, United States.

Traction alopecia is prevalent in patients of color. Its significance in clinical practice may be underemphasized due to the transient nature of the condition; however, it has the potential to become permanent and cause significant psychosocial distress. Understanding of afro-textured hair and cultural practices, as well as early recognition and treatment, provides an opportunity to prevent permanent traction alopecia and long-term sequelae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijwd.2021.01.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8072502PMC
March 2021

Hidradenitis suppurativa: pathogenesis, clinical presentation, epidemiology, and comorbid associations.

Int J Dermatol 2021 Apr 22. Epub 2021 Apr 22.

Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is clinically defined by lesions ranging from painful, deep seated nodules to abscesses, draining sinus tracts, and ultimately, irreversible fibrotic scars. While the etiology remains unclear, a number of mechanisms ranging from genetics to aberrations of the immune system have been proposed. In addition, HS has a number of associations and may occur in conjunction with several diseases that span a host of medical specialties. The estimated prevalence ranges are from 1% to 4%; however, a large degree of under-reporting and misdiagnosis of this condition likely underestimates its true clinical significance. The debilitating consequences of missed diagnoses or improper management leads to severe pain and irreversible cutaneous manifestations (i.e., fistulae, sinus tracts, disfiguring scarring). HS has been found to significantly impair patients' quality of life to a greater degree when compared with other skin conditions. Early recognition and treatment are critical for a favorable prognosis, and diagnostic delays may be related to variable presentations within numerous comorbidities. Here we provide an in-depth, clinical-based review of HS, highlighting the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, grading systems, epidemiology, and comorbidities, in hopes of shedding light on an often misunderstood disease and ultimately moving closer to a more conclusive understanding of its various presentations and association.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.15579DOI Listing
April 2021

Honeycomb-like cavities in a single fingernail plate.

JAAD Case Rep 2020 Feb 17;6(2):89-91. Epub 2020 Jan 17.

Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2019.10.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7005338PMC
February 2020

Unusual presentation of hereditary leiomyomatosis mimicking neurofibromatosis.

JAAD Case Rep 2018 Jun 30;4(5):440-441. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2017.12.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6031563PMC
June 2018

Eccrine Poromatosis: Case Report, Review of the Literature, and Treatment.

Skin Appendage Disord 2015 Sep 12;1(2):95-8. Epub 2015 Aug 12.

Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Ala., USA.

Eccrine poromas arise from the intraepidermal region of the eccrine sweat duct and most often occur as a benign solitary tumor. There are few reports of the occurrence of multiple lesions, defined as poromatosis, which may present in patients who have undergone radiotherapy and/or polychemotherapy. We report the case of a 43-year-old male with a history of mantle cell lymphoma who had undergone 6 cycles of polychemotherapy. He presented to the dermatology clinic for multiple painful lesions on his palms and soles. Several biopsies were performed consistent with eccrine poromas. The patient was successfully treated with a combination of excision, imiquimod cream, and cryosurgery. This case adds to the literature regarding the pathogenesis and treatment options of eccrine poromatosis. Herein, we report a case of eccrine poromatosis that developed after 6 cycles of chemotherapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000438458DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4857838PMC
September 2015

Putting onychomycosis under the microscope.

Nurse Pract 2014 May;39(5):8-11

Tiffany T. Mayo is a dermatology clinical research fellow and Wendy Cantrell is an assistant professor at The University of Alabama-Birmingham Department of Dermatology, Birmingham, Ala.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NPR.0000444656.40636.00DOI Listing
May 2014

Comparative study on bruise reduction treatments after bruise induction using the pulsed dye laser.

Dermatol Surg 2013 Oct 30;39(10):1459-64. Epub 2013 Jul 30.

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Background: Several bruise reduction methods have been suggested to decrease postprocedure ecchymoses. Comparing the effectiveness of common bruise reduction therapies provides better evidence of the efficacy of bruise reduction techniques.

Objective: To compare the effectiveness of cold compresses, hydrogen peroxide, over-the-counter bruise serum, and pulsed dye laser (PDL) in minimizing the time required for bruise resolution.

Methods: Seventeen patients aged 22 to 51 (mean 28) with Fitzpatrick skin types I to IV underwent bruise induction with a PDL to produce five 2- by 2-cm zones of bruising on the lower abdomen. Excluding the control, bruises were randomly treated using a cold compress, bruise serum, 3% hydrogen peroxide-soaked gauze, or PDL. Subjects and two blinded physician evaluators evaluated bruise severity and graded it on a visual analog scale on days 0, 3, and 7.

Results: Treatment did not result in statistically significantly shorter bruise resolution time than in controls. PDL-treated bruises took a statistically significantly longer time to resolve than controls.

Conclusion: Our study showed no significant difference in cold compress, hydrogen peroxide, and over-the-counter serum in reducing time to bruise resolution. PDL therapy resulted in greater bruise severity scores and increased time to bruise resolution when used soon after bruise induction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dsu.12293DOI Listing
October 2013
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