Publications by authors named "Tiffany E Weksberg"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Molecular dynamics simulations of Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin show a loop-cap transition.

Biophys J 2007 May 26;92(10):3337-45. Epub 2007 Feb 26.

Structural and Computational Biology and Molecular Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

The crystal structure of the oxidized Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin (Tvfd) showed a unique crevice that exposed the redox center. Here we have examined the dynamics and solvation of the active site of Tvfd using molecular dynamics simulations of both the reduced and oxidized states. The oxidized simulation stays true to the crystal form with a heavy atom root mean-squared deviation of 2 A. However, within the reduced simulation of Tvfd a profound loop-cap transition into the redox center occurred within 6-ns of the start of the simulation and remained open throughout the rest of the 20-ns simulation. This large opening seen in the simulations supports the hypothesis that the exceptionally fast electron transfer rate between Tvfd and the drug metronidazole is due to the increased access of the antibiotic to the redox center of the protein and not due to the reduction potential.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1529/biophysj.106.088096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1853131PMC
May 2007

Effects of dimerization of Serratia marcescens endonuclease on water dynamics.

Biopolymers 2007 Feb;85(3):241-52

Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5641, USA.

The dynamics and structure of Serratia marcescens endonuclease and its neighboring solvent are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD). Comparisons are made with structural and biochemical experiments. The dimer form is physiologic and functions more processively than the monomer. We previously found a channel formed by connected clusters of waters from the active site to the dimer interface. Here, we show that dimerization clearly changes correlations in the water structure and dynamics in the active site not seen in the monomer. Our results indicate that water at the active sites of the dimer is less affected compared with bulk solvent than in the monomer where it has much slower characteristic relaxation times. Given that water is a required participant in the reaction, this gives a clear advantage to dimerization in the absence of an apparent ability to use both active sites simultaneously.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bip.20641DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2583238PMC
February 2007