Publications by authors named "Tianyang Xu"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Efficacy and safety of a self-developed home-based enhanced knee flexion exercise program compared with standard supervised physiotherapy to improve mobility and quality of life after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized control study.

J Orthop Surg Res 2021 Jun 14;16(1):382. Epub 2021 Jun 14.

Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 301 Yanchang Rd, Shanghai, 200072, People's Republic of China.

Background: This randomized controlled study compared standard supervised physiotherapy (SPT) with a self-developed, home-based, enhanced knee flexion exercise program involving a low stool (KFEH) in patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA).

Methods: Patients were recruited from July 2014 to December 2015 and randomly assigned to one of two groups: KFEH (n = 60) and SPT (n = 59). Outcomes (joint function) were evaluated according to the Knee Society Score (KSS), visual analog scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score, and range of motion (ROM) assessment at selected time points (preoperatively; 1 week; 1, 3, and 6 months; and 1 year after surgery).

Results: Pain and functional improvement were observed in both groups. Non-inferiority of KFEH was evident 12 months postoperatively; however, patients in the KFEH group exhibited better ROM at 1 month (P < 0.01). Absolute WOMAC and KSS scores were slightly better in the KFEH group, although the difference was not statistically significant. There was no difference in VAS scores and complication rates between the two groups. Additionally, the home program would save patient time and decrease the economic burden associated with in-hospital SPT.

Conclusion: Considering rehabilitation and economic efficiency as well as the COVID pandemic, a home-based enhanced knee flexion exercise program for TKA rehabilitation is recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13018-021-02516-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8202539PMC
June 2021

Correction to: microRNA-216b enhances cisplatin-induced apoptosis in osteosarcoma MG63 and SaOS-2 cells by binding to JMJD2C and regulating the HIF1α/HES1 signaling axis.

J Exp Clin Cancer Res 2021 Jan 7;40(1):17. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200433, P.R. China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13046-020-01804-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7788738PMC
January 2021

Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profile of the SNAT Gene Family in Tobacco ().

Front Genet 2020 27;11:591984. Epub 2020 Oct 27.

Biocontrol Engineering Research Center of Plant Disease and Pest, Biocontrol Engineering Research Center of Crop Disease and Pest, Yunnan University, Kunming, China.

Melatonin plays key roles in development and confers stress tolerance to plants. Serotonin -acetyltransferase (SNAT) is either the enzyme involved in the last step or the penultimate enzyme of phytomelatonin biosynthesis. To date, genes have not been characterized in tobacco (), an economically important plant species. The sequence of the Acetyltransf_7 conserved domain was used as a query sequence, and 12 candidate genes were in turn identified in the genome of tobacco. These s could be divided into two groups based on the phylogenetic tree. and clustered together with the other typical s, but the other 10 s separately clustered outside of the typical s. These 10 s have only motif 1, whereas representative s, such as and or a from cyanobacteria, have five motifs. In addition, and are highly homologous to the characterized , 62.95 and 71.36%, respectively; however, the homology between the other 10 genes and is low. Concomitantly, it is hypothesized that and are the homolog of , whereas the other 10 candidates could be considered -like genes. Furthermore, both and , two diploid ancestor species of , have two candidates; therefore, it is speculated that gene rearrangement or deletion during the process of genomic stabilization after whole-genome duplication or polyploidization led to the preservation of and during the evolution of tobacco from the ancestral diploid to the allotetraploid. and -like genes were differentially expressed in all organs under different stress conditions, indicating that these genes potentially associated with plant growth and development and stress resistance. Under different stress conditions, the expression of was significantly upregulated upon high-temperature and cadmium stresses, while the expression of did not significantly increase under any of the tested stress treatments. These results provide valuable information for elucidating the evolutionary relationship of genes in tobacco and genetic resources for improving tobacco production in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2020.591984DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7652900PMC
October 2020

microRNA-216b enhances cisplatin-induced apoptosis in osteosarcoma MG63 and SaOS-2 cells by binding to JMJD2C and regulating the HIF1α/HES1 signaling axis.

J Exp Clin Cancer Res 2020 Sep 24;39(1):201. Epub 2020 Sep 24.

Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 200433, P.R. China.

Background: Although cisplatin-based chemotherapy represents the standard regimen for osteosarcoma (OS), OS patients often exhibit treatment failure and poor prognosis due to chemoresistance to cisplatin. Emerging research has highlighted the tumor suppressive properties of microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) in various human cancers via the inhibition of the histone demethylase jumonji domain containing protein 2C (JMJD2C). As a coactivator for hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α), JMJD2C targets hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1) gene. Hence, the current study aimed to elucidate the role of miR-216b in OS cell cisplatin resistance to identify the underlying mechanism of miR-216b regulating the JMJD2C//HIF1α/HES1 signaling.

Methods: Tumor and paracancerous tissues were collected from OS patients to determine the expression patterns of miR-216b and JMJD2C. After ectopic expression and knockdown experiments in the OS cells, CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry were employed to determine cell viability and apoptosis. The interaction of miR-216b, JMJD2C, HIF1α and HES1 was subsequently determined by dual luciferase reporter, co-immunoprecipitation (IP) and ChIP-qPCR assays. In vivo experiments were conducted to further verify the role of the miR-216b in the resistance of OS cells to cisplatin.

Results: miR-216b expression was reduced in the OS tissues, as well as the MG63 and SaOS-2 cells. Heightened miR-216b expression was found to be positively correlated with patient survival, and miR-216b further enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis of MG63 and SaOS-2 cells. Mechanistically, miR-216b inhibited JMJD2C expression by binding to its 3'UTR. Through interaction with HIF1α, JMJD2C removed the H3K9 methylation modification at the HES1 promoter region, leading to upregulation of HES1 in vitro. Furthermore, miR-216b was observed to increase the tumor growth in nude mice in the presence of cisplatin treatment. HES1 overexpression weakened the effects of miR-216b in MG63 and SaOS-2 cells and in nude mouse xenografts.

Conclusion: Overall, miR-216b enhanced the sensitivity of OS cells to cisplatin via downregulation of the JMJD2C/HIF1α/HES1 signaling axis, highlighting the capacity of miR-216b as an adjunct to cisplatin chemotherapy in the treatment of OS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13046-020-01670-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7517798PMC
September 2020

Letter to the Editor on "Total Knee Arthroplasty Has a Positive Effect on Patients With Low Mental Health Scores".

J Arthroplasty 2020 09 1;35(9):2684-2685. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2020.05.063DOI Listing
September 2020

Tripartite Motif-Containing 46 Promotes Viability and Inhibits Apoptosis of Osteosarcoma Cells by Activating NF-B Signaling Through Ubiquitination of PPAR.

Oncol Res 2020 Sep 15;28(4):409-421. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Department of Orthopedics, The Affiliated Suzhou Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Suzhou Municipal HospitalSuzhouP.R. China.

Osteosarcoma (OS), the most common bone cancer, causes high morbidity in children and young adults. TRIM46 is a member of the family of tripartite motif (TRIM)-containing proteins that serve as important regulators of tumorigenesis. Here we investigate the possible role of TRIM46 in OS and the underlying molecular mechanism. We report an increase in the expression of TRIM46 in OS and its association with tumor size, Ennekings stage, and patient prognosis. TRIM46 knockdown inhibits OS cell viability and cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis, while TRIM46 overexpression exerts inverse effects, which are inhibited by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR) overexpression and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-B) inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). Furthermore, TRIM46 negatively regulates PPAR expression via ubiquitination-mediated protein degradation and modification. PPAR overexpression also inactivates NF-B signaling and NF-B promoter activity in OS cells overexpressing TRIM46. Moreover, TRIM46 knockdown inhibits tumor growth and induces apoptosis of OS cells in vivo. TRIM46 acts as an oncogene in OS by interacting with and ubiquitinating PPAR, resulting in the activation of NF-B signaling pathway. Thus, TRIM46 may be a potential biomarker of carcinogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096504020X15868639303417DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7851538PMC
September 2020

LncRNA RP11-361F15.2 promotes osteosarcoma tumorigenesis by inhibiting M2-Like polarization of tumor-associated macrophages of CPEB4.

Cancer Lett 2020 03 2;473:33-49. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

The Institute of Intervention Vessel, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Shanghai, PR China. Electronic address:

Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulates the initiation and progression of osteosarcoma (OS), specifically lncRNA RP11-361F15.2 has been shown to play prominent roles in tumorigenesis. Previously, M2-Like polarization of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) has been identified to play a key role in cancer migration/invasion. Hence, it is essential to understand the role of RP11-361F15.2 in tumorigenesis and its association with M2-Like polarization of TAMs. The results indicate that RP11-361F15.2 is significantly increased in OS tissues, and its expression is positively correlated with cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 4 (CPEB4) expression and negatively associated with miR-30c-5p expression. Further, overexpression of RP11-361F15.2 increased OS cell migration/invasion and M2-Like polarization of TAMs in vitro, as well as promoted xenograft tumor growth in vivo. Mechanistically, luciferase reporter assays indicated that RP11-361F15.2 upregulated CPEB4 expression by competitively binding to miR-30c-5p. Further, we have identified that RP11-361F15.2 promotes CPEB4-mediated tumorigenesis and M2-Like polarization of TAMs through miR-30c-5p in OS. We also identified that RP11-361F15.2 acts as competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) against miR-30c-5p thereby binding and activating CPEB4. This RP11-361F15.2/miR-30c-5p/CPEB4 loop could be used as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of OS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2019.12.041DOI Listing
March 2020

Aggressive behavior and brain neuronal activation in sexually naïve male Mongolian gerbils.

Behav Brain Res 2020 01 4;378:112276. Epub 2019 Oct 4.

Department of Psychology and Program in Neuroscience, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, USA.

Aggressive behavior plays an important role in animal's survival and reproductive success. Although there has been growing interests in studying neural mechanisms underlying aggressive behavior using traditional laboratory animal models, little is known about mechanisms controlling naturally occurring aggression in sexually naïve animals. In the present study, we characterized aggressive behavior displayed by sexually naïve male Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) and examined the subsequent neuronal activation in the brain measured by Fos-immunoreactive (Fos-ir) staining. We found that resident males initiated attacks and showed intense levels of aggression (including chase, bite, offensive sideway, lunge and on-top) towards a conspecific male intruder. Furthermore, attacks from the resident males towards the intruder produced a nonrandom distribution of bites, with the most on the rump, flank, back and tail and few on the limbs, ventrum and head. In contrast, control males that were exposed to a woodblock (control for novelty) never attacked the woodblock and showed higher levels of object/environmental investigation. Male gerbils exposed to an intruder had significantly higher levels of Fos-ir density in the medial (MeA) and anterior cortical (ACo) subnuclei of the amygdala, principal nucleus (BSTpr) and interfascicular nucleus (BSTif) of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, ventrolateral subdivision of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl), and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), compared to control males. Together, our results indicate that sexually naïve, group housed male gerbils naturally display aggression towards conspecific strangers, and such aggressive behavior is associated with special patterns of neuronal activation in the brain.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2019.112276DOI Listing
January 2020

Learning Adaptive Discriminative Correlation Filters via Temporal Consistency Preserving Spatial Feature Selection for Robust Visual Object Tracking.

IEEE Trans Image Process 2019 Nov 3;28(11):5596-5609. Epub 2019 Jun 3.

With efficient appearance learning models, discriminative correlation filter (DCF) has been proven to be very successful in recent video object tracking benchmarks and competitions. However, the existing DCF paradigm suffers from two major issues, i.e., spatial boundary effect and temporal filter degradation. To mitigate these challenges, we propose a new DCF-based tracking method. The key innovations of the proposed method include adaptive spatial feature selection and temporal consistent constraints, with which the new tracker enables joint spatial-temporal filter learning in a lower dimensional discriminative manifold. More specifically, we apply structured spatial sparsity constraints to multi-channel filters. Consequently, the process of learning spatial filters can be approximated by the lasso regularization. To encourage temporal consistency, the filter model is restricted to lie around its historical value and updated locally to preserve the global structure in the manifold. Last, a unified optimization framework is proposed to jointly select temporal consistency preserving spatial features and learn discriminative filters with the augmented Lagrangian method. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations have been conducted on a number of well-known benchmarking datasets such as OTB2013, OTB50, OTB100, Temple-Colour, UAV123, and VOT2018. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TIP.2019.2919201DOI Listing
November 2019

Using anatomical landmarks to calculate the normal joint line position in Chinese people: an observational study.

J Orthop Surg Res 2018 Oct 19;13(1):261. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital of Tongji University, 301 Yanchang Rd, Shanghai, 200072, China.

Background: Restoring the normal joint line (JL) is an important goal to achieve in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We intended to study the veracity of several landmarks used to level the normal JL in Chinese people.

Methods: Two hundred fifteen standard CT scans of knee joint were included to measure the distances from landmarks to distal JL (DJL) and posterior JL (PJL), along with femoral width (FW) in order to calculate the ratios. Landmarks included adductor tubercle (AT), medial epicondyle (ME), lateral epicondyle (LE), tibial tubercle (TT), fibular head (FH) and the inferior pole of the patella (IPP). Ratios were calculated between distances and FW (e.g. FHDJL/FW). Linear regression analysis and t test were used to determine the accuracy and the differences amongst sides of the leg, genders and races.

Results: The average of IPPDJL/FW, TTDJL/FW, FHDJL/FW, LEDJL/FW, LEPJL/FW, MEDJL/FW, MEPJL/FW, ATDJL/FW and ATPJL/FW were 0.165, 0.295, 0.232, 0.297, 0.281, 0.327, 0.3PJL, 0.558 and 0.313, respectively. No significant difference had been found between the left and right leg. A gender difference was only found statistically on the ratio of IPP, and also, no linear correlation was observed only between IPP and FW. Most of the difference values lain in a 4-mm threshold for MEDJL (95.81%), LEDJL (94.88%), MEPJL (97.21%), LEPJL (94.88%), ATPJL (93.49%) and ATDJL (100%). Significant differences were observed amongst different races.

Conclusions: AT, ME and LE can be used as reliable landmarks to locate the normal JL in Chinese population intraoperatively. It is meaningful to come up with a set of ratios to different races.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13018-018-0963-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6194602PMC
October 2018

Upregulation of long noncoding RNA Xist promotes proliferation of osteosarcoma by epigenetic silencing of P21.

Oncotarget 2017 Nov 8;8(60):101406-101417. Epub 2017 Sep 8.

Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tong Ji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072, People's Republic of China.

Recent studies show that lncRNAs involve in the initiation and progression of various cancers including osteosarcoma (OS). IncRNA Xist has been verified as an oncogene in several human cancers, and its abnormal expression was closely associated with tumor initiation and progression. Nevertheless, the role of Xist in OS remains unclear. Here, we revealed the Xist expression level was up-regulated in OS tissues and discovered that Xist knockdown significantly repressed OS cell proliferation. Additionally, mechanistic analysis revealed that Xist can repress P21 expression to regulate OS cell cycle and proliferation by binding to EZH2. Taking all into account, Xist may function in promoting OS cell proliferation and may potentially serve as a novel biomarker and therapeutic target for OS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.20738DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5731884PMC
November 2017

Morphologic features of the distal femur and tibia plateau in Southeastern Chinese population: A cross-sectional study.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Nov;96(46):e8524

aDepartment of Orthopedics, Tongji University School of Medicine bDepartment of Radiology, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China.

Morphologic measurements of the femoral and tibial features of western population have been done in several studies, which provides the fundamental data for the design of total knee arthroplasty prosthesis used globally, including China. However, researches on anatomic and morphologic features of the knee in Chinese populations of both sexes have never been conducted. Our study was aimed at investigating the anatomic and morphologic features of the knees of the Southeastern Chinese population by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, so as to provide parameters for sex- and ethnic-specific implant designs in the future.A total of 245 knees from 244 Chinese adults (130 females and 114 males, aging from 18 to 89 years) who received knee MRI scan from November 2014 to October 2015 were recruited and analyzed. A set of linear and angular parameters, and 6 normalized ratios were measured and calculated on the distal femur and proximal tibia.The knee size was significantly different between sexes. Compared with women, men have larger (P < .01) medial-lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) dimensions in both distal femur and proximal tibia. Differences in femoral shape, represented by the femur surface ratio, between both sexes were also identified (1.23 ± 0.07 vs 1.27 ± 0.07, P < .01), whereas the ML/AP ratios of the tibia are similar between both sexes (1.44 ± 0.07 vs 1.44 ± 0.09, P = .97). We also found substantial difference in the morphology of femur and tibia plateau in Southeastern Chinese population compared with data obtained from western populations.Our study measured the anatomic and morphologic features of the knees in Southeastern Chinese population, and identified knee morphologic differences between both sexes, as well as western and Chinese population. Further clinical studies are needed to determine other essential parameters for the design of prosthesis to the Chinese populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000008524DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5704801PMC
November 2017

The WinCF Model - An Inexpensive and Tractable Microcosm of a Mucus Plugged Bronchiole to Study the Microbiology of Lung Infections.

J Vis Exp 2017 05 8(123). Epub 2017 May 8.

Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California, San Diego;

Many chronic airway diseases result in mucus plugging of the airways. Lungs of an individual with cystic fibrosis are an exemplary case where their mucus-plugged bronchioles create a favorable habitat for microbial colonization. Various pathogens thrive in this environment interacting with each other and driving many of the symptoms associated with CF disease. Like any microbial community, the chemical conditions of their habitat have a significant impact on the community structure and dynamics. For example, different microorganisms thrive in differing levels of oxygen or other solute concentrations. This is also true in the CF lung, where oxygen concentrations are believed to drive community physiology and structure. The methods described here are designed to mimic the lung environment and grow pathogens in a manner more similar to that from which they cause disease. Manipulation of the chemical surroundings of these microbes is then used to study how the chemistry of lung infections governs its microbial ecology. The method, called the WinCF system, is based on artificial sputum medium and narrow capillary tubes meant to provide an oxygen gradient similar to that which exists in mucus-plugged bronchioles. Manipulating chemical conditions, such as the media pH of the sputum or antibiotics pressure, allows for visualization of the microbiological differences in those samples using colored indicators, watching for gas or biofilm production, or extracting and sequencing the nucleic acid contents of each sample.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/55532DOI Listing
May 2017

MicroRNA-661 Enhances TRAIL or STS Induced Osteosarcoma Cell Apoptosis by Modulating the Expression of Cytochrome c1.

Cell Physiol Biochem 2017 7;41(5):1935-1946. Epub 2017 Apr 7.

Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Aim: Osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive bone malignancy that affects rapidly growing bones and is associated with a poor prognosis. Our previous study showed that cytochrome c1 (CYC1), a subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III) of the mitochondrial electron chain, is overexpressed in human OS tissues and cell lines and its silencing induces apoptosis in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying the modulation of CYC1 expression in OS and its role in the resistance of OS to apoptosis.

Methods: qRT-PCR, luciferase reporter assay, western blotting, fow cytometry, and animal experiments were performed in this study.

Results: MicroRNA (miR)-661 was identified as a downregulated miRNA in OS tissues and cells and shown to directly target CYC1. Ectopically expressed miR-661 inhibited OS cell growth, promoted apoptosis, and reduced the activity of mitochondrial complex III. miR-661 overexpression enhanced TRAIL or STS induced apoptosis and promoted the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, which induced caspase-9 activation, and these effects were abolished by a caspase-3 inhibitor. Overexpression of CYC1 rescued the effects of miR-661 on sensitizing OS cells to TRAIL or STS induced apoptosis, indicating that the antitumor effect of miR-661 is mediated by the downregulation of CYC1. In vivo, miR-661 overexpression sensitized tumors to TRAIL or STS induced apoptosis in a xenograft mouse model, and these effects were attenuated by co-expression of CYC1.

Conclusion: Taken together, our results indicate that miR-661 plays a tumor suppressor role in OS mediated by the downregulation of CYC1, suggesting a potential mechanism underlying cell death resistance in OS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000472380DOI Listing
June 2017

Comparison of clinical outcomes in all-arthroscopic versus mini-open repair of rotator cuff tears: A randomized clinical trial.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2017 Mar;96(11):e6322

Department of Orthopedics, Taihu Hospital of Wuxi, Wuxi Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital Nan Jing Medical University, Nangjing Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai Department of Psychiatry, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Background: The aim of the study was to compare the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing all-arthroscopic (AA) or mini-open (MO) rotator cuff repair.

Methods: The present study evaluated 50 patients who had undergone AA repair and 50 patients who had undergone MO repair with a minimum 1-year follow-up. Every patient was asked to complete the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and visual analog scale (VAS) questionnaires. Constant-Murley score (CMS) and active ranges, forward flexion and external rotation, were also evaluated and documented. One year after surgery, ultrasound evaluation was done to determine the integrity of the rotator cuff for each patient.

Results: The average age of enrolled patients at the time of surgery was 53.0 years (range, 40-59 years), and average follow-up was 16.6 months (range, 12-24 months). At 2 weeks, the range of forward flexion in the AA group was larger than that in the MO group (136.5 ± 10.2 vs 132.5 ± 7.7, P = 0.03). On postoperative day 1, the VAS in the MO group was significantly higher than that in the AA group (6.5 ± 0.6 vs 6.1 ± 0.6, P < 0.01). At 1 month, the difference in VAS between both groups reappeared (2.9 ± 0.6 vs 2.6 ± 0.6, P = 0.03). At 1 month, the CMS score of patients in the AA group was higher than that in the MO group (52.8 ± 3.6 vs 50.9 ± 5.0, P = 0.03). At 3 and 6 months, the DASH score of patients in the AA group was lower than that in the MO group (43.8 ± 8.2 vs 47.8 ± 4.4, P < 0.01 and 38.6 ± 4.3 vs 42.7 ± 9.9, P < 0.01, respectively). Mean operative time was longer in the AA group compared with that in the MO group (71.9 ± 17.6 vs 64.7 ± 12.7 minutes, P < 0.01). Five patients (10.0%) in the AA group and 4 patients (8.2%) in the MO group had rotator cuff retear, and 6 patients (12.0%) in the AA group and 8 patients (16.3%) in the MO group had adhesive capsulitis by the end of follow-up. There is no significant difference between the 2 groups in the incidence of complications. We also found that joint exercising at least 3 times per week was associated with better short- and long-term joint function recovery.

Conclusions: The AA approach was associated with less pain and lower DASH score as well as higher CMS score in the early recovery period. No difference was found between the 2 groups in primary and secondary outcomes in the long term, or incidence of complications such as adhesive capsulitis and rotator cuff retear. In conclusion, we consider that the AA procedure has better recovery at short-term follow-ups, while both techniques are equivalent regarding long-term outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000006322DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5369905PMC
March 2017

MiR-329 suppresses osteosarcoma development by downregulating Rab10.

FEBS Lett 2016 09 19;590(17):2973-81. Epub 2016 Aug 19.

Department of Orthopedics, Suzhou Municipal Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, China.

MiR-329 has been proved to be a tumor suppressor gene in various malignancies, however, its role in osteosarcoma remains elusive. We found that miR-329 is remarkably downregulated in osteosarcoma tissues and relates to advanced stages. MiR-329 is able to inhibit osteosarcoma cell proliferation, promote apoptosis, and induce G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. In addition, miR-329 also suppresses wound-healing and migration ability of osteosarcoma cells and inhibits tumorigenicity in vivo. Rab10 was identified as a target of miR-329 in osteosarcoma and mediates its biofunction. These findings may shed light to the understanding of tumor development in osteosarcoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/1873-3468.12337DOI Listing
September 2016

Pseudolaric acid B activates autophagy in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to prevent cell death.

Oncol Lett 2016 Mar 14;11(3):1731-1737. Epub 2016 Jan 14.

Institute of Virology and AIDS Research, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021, P.R. China; Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) has been demonstrated to exert antitumor effects in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of resistance to PAB-induced cell death. Following incubation with 4 µM of PAB for 3 days, the majority of MCF-7 cells became senescent, while some retained the same morphology as control cells, as assessed using a senescence detection kit. Additionally, 36 h of treatment with 4 µM of PAB increased the positive staining of autophagy markers, as shown by monodansylcadaverine and acridine orange staining. Western blot analysis indicated that this treatment also increased expression of the autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Furthermore, treatment with PAB and the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine significantly decreased the ratio of autophagy, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of monodansylcadaverine staining density (P<0.001), and increased the ratio of cell death, as assessed by MTT analysis (P<0.001). This indicated that autophagy promotes cell survival as a resistance mechanism to PAB treatment. Additionally, the present study demonstrated that PAB treatment did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential, which may be related to autophagy. Increased Bcl-2 expression may explain why PAB did not affect the mitochondrial membrane potential. A Bcl-2 binding test demonstrated that PAB treatment inhibits the binding of Bcl-2 and Beclin-1, which may free Beclin-1 to participate in autophagy. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that autophagy may be activated by PAB treatment in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, contributing to resistance to cell death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ol.2016.4103DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4774411PMC
March 2016

The Effect of Patella Eversion on Clinical Outcome Measures in Simultaneous Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

J Arthroplasty 2016 Mar 29;31(3):637-40. Epub 2015 Oct 29.

The tenth People's Hospital affiliated with Tong Ji University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Background: During total knee arthroplasty (TKA), surgical exposure requires mobilization technique of the patella. With this trial, we intended to investigate the effect of patella eversion on clinical outcome measures in simultaneous bilateral TKA.

Methods: We prospectively enrolled 44 patients (88 knees) from April 2008 to June 20l4.One knee was operated with patella eversion (group A) and the other with patella lateral retraction (group B) randomly. Follow-up results, including the operation time, complications, and the time of achieving straight leg raise (SLR) and 90° knee flexion, were recorded. The data of range of motion (ROM) and Visual Analogue Scale score were collected separately at 7 days, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively.

Results: The time of achieving SLR was 2.7 ± 0.8 days in group A and 2.1 ± 0.7 DAYS in group B, which were significantly different (P = .032). Significant difference was found on active and passive ROM during the follow-up times between groups A and B, except the passive ROM at 6 months postoperatively. No significant difference was found on operation time, complications, patella baja or tilt, time of achieving 90°knee flexion, and Visual Analogue Scale score during the follow-up times.

Conclusions: Patellar eversion was adverse to the early knee function recovery after TKA; it would delay the time of achieving SLR and decrease the passive and active ROM. In addition, more carefully and scientifically designed randomized controlled trials are still required to further prove the claim.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2015.09.040DOI Listing
March 2016