Publications by authors named "Thomas Pruzinsky"

8 Publications

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Caring for Plastic Surgery Patients Experiencing Significant Psychological Disturbance: The Foundational and Enduring Contributions of Milton T Edgerton, MD.

Authors:
Thomas Pruzinsky

J Craniofac Surg 2019 Mar/Apr;30(2):294-297

University of Connecticut, Pennsylvania State University, College of Arts & Sciences, PA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000005323DOI Listing
May 2019

Quality of life and psychosocial adjustment to burn injury: social functioning, body image, and health policy perspectives.

Int Rev Psychiatry 2009 Dec;21(6):539-48

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA.

This paper reviews four major topics related to the long-term psychosocial rehabilitation for burn survivors; (1) Body image adjustment process; (2) Social functioning challenges; (3) Interventions designed to address psychosocial rehabilitation challenges; and (4) Current policy developments in the USA and the UK that focus on raising the rehabilitation standards for psychosocial care for burn survivors. While acknowledging the close relationship between body image distress and social functioning, these two areas are reviewed separately with the goal of addressing two specific questions. First, what does current empirical research and clinical experience teach us about each of these areas, and second, what are the most important gaps in current knowledge about body image and social functioning, respectively? The final section of the paper specifically addresses the question of what can be done, from a practical and a health policy perspective, to ensure that existing body image and social difficulties are appropriately addressed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09540260903343901DOI Listing
December 2009

Enhancing quality of life in medical populations: a vision for body image assessment and rehabilitation as standards of care.

Authors:
Thomas Pruzinsky

Body Image 2004 Jan;1(1):71-81

Department of Psychology, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT 06518, USA.

This article presents a vision and framework for establishing body image assessment and rehabilitation as a standard of care for patients with medical disorders. Making this vision a reality depends upon: (1) a thorough understanding of the body image construct; (2) application of many new forms of body image assessment; (3) refined understanding of body image disorder and dysfunction in the context of medical conditions; and (4) a clear plan to implement and evaluate prevention, rehabilitation, and treatment programs. Applying the many important developments that have occurred in body image theory, assessment, and intervention over the past decade holds promise for enhancing the quality of life of many individuals with medical conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1740-1445(03)00010-XDOI Listing
January 2004

The influence of plastic surgery "reality TV" on cosmetic surgery patient expectations and decision making.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2007 Jul;120(1):316-324

New Haven and Hamden, Conn. From the Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, and the Department of Psychology, Quinnipiac University.

Background: The aim of this study was to survey first-time patients seeking cosmetic surgery and examine what role "reality TV" played in their perception of the risks and benefits of surgery and their overall decision-making process.

Methods: Information on demographics, television viewing patterns, and patients' self-assessed plastic surgery knowledge was collected from 42 patients. They were asked how similar they believed the shows were to real life and what degree of influence the shows had on their decision to pursue cosmetic surgery. Patients were then divided into groups by program viewing intensity.

Results: Fifty-seven percent of patients were "high-intensity" viewers of plastic surgery reality television shows. When compared with low-intensity viewers, high-intensity viewers believed themselves to be more knowledgeable about plastic surgery (p < 0.05) and believed the shows were more similar to real life (p < 0.05). Overall, four of five patients reported that television influenced them to pursue a cosmetic surgery procedure, with nearly one-third feeling "very much" or "moderately" influenced.

Conclusions: Plastic surgery reality television plays a significant role in cosmetic surgery patient perceptions and decision making. Patients who regularly watched one or more reality television show reported a greater influence from television and media to pursue cosmetic surgery, felt more knowledgeable about cosmetic surgery in general, and felt that plastic surgery reality television was more similar to real life than did low-intensity viewers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.prs.0000264339.67451.71DOI Listing
July 2007

Psychological health and function after burn injury: setting research priorities.

J Burn Care Res 2007 Jul-Aug;28(4):587-92

Johns Hopkins Burn Center, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, 4940 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BCR.0B013E318093E470DOI Listing
October 2007

Quality of life and facial trauma: psychological and body image effects.

Ann Plast Surg 2005 May;54(5):502-10

Section of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8041, USA.

This study evaluated the social and psychologic impact of facial trauma on previously healthy individuals. Inclusion criteria for the study included 18- to 45-year-old individuals who had a facial laceration of 3 cm or greater and/or a fractured facial bone requiring operative intervention within 6 months to 2 years prior to participation in the study. Retrospective analysis of patients at Yale New Haven Hospital Emergency Department was done between May 1997 and December 1998. When compared with a control population, the study group showed a statistically significant lower satisfaction with life, more negative perception of body image, higher incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder, higher incidence of alcoholism, and an increase in depression. Also, among the study group there was a significantly higher incidence of posttrauma unemployment, marital problems, binge drinking, jail, and lower attractiveness scores. In conclusion, in this preliminary study, it appears that the result of facial scarring/trauma includes a significantly decreased satisfaction with life, an altered perception of body image, a higher incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder, a higher incidence of alcoholism, and increased posttrauma jail, unemployment, binge drinking, and marital problems. Thus, it appears that there is significant negative social and functional impact related to facial trauma and scarring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.sap.0000155282.48465.94DOI Listing
May 2005

Measuring outcomes in plastic surgery: body image and quality of life in abdominoplasty patients.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2003 Aug;112(2):619-25; discussion 626-7

Section of Plastic Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

Abdominoplasty is an increasingly common aesthetic surgery procedure that has yet to be evaluated using the most recently developed and psychometrically sophisticated measures of body image and quality-of-life outcomes. This study prospectively evaluated 30 consecutive female abdominoplasty patients, preoperatively and postoperatively, using measures of body image, psychological investment in appearance, and general psychosocial functioning. One-way repeated-measures (pretest versus posttest) analyses of variance revealed significant positive postsurgical changes on the Appearance Evaluation subscale of the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire. Mean scores for the questionnaire's Body Areas Satisfaction Scale improved postoperatively (p < 0.001). Scores for the Body Exposure and Sexual Relations Questionnaire also improved significantly (p < 0.001) postoperatively. These findings indicate significant improvements in body image outcome, including positive changes in patients' evaluations of their overall appearance, their average body image dissatisfaction, and their experiences of self-consciousness and avoidance of body exposure during sexual activities. As predicted, no changes were seen on any measure of psychological investment in appearance or on patients' reports of general psychosocial functioning (self-esteem, satisfaction with life, or social anxiety).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.PRS.0000070972.57000.08DOI Listing
August 2003