Publications by authors named "Thomas Perrin"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Potential interactions between Mesolithic hunter-gatherers and Neolithic farmers in the Western Mediterranean: The geochronological data revisited.

PLoS One 2021 3;16(3):e0246964. Epub 2021 Mar 3.

UMR5608 TRACES, CNRS, Toulouse Jean-Jaurès University, Toulouse, France.

In the Western Mediterranean, the Neolithic mainly developed and expanded during the sixth millennium BCE. In these early phases, it generally spread through the displacement of human groups, sometimes over long distances, as shown, for example, by the Impressa sites documented on the northern shores. These groups then settled new territories which they gradually appropriated and exploited. The question of their potential interaction with groups of Late Mesolithic hunter-gatherers living in the area prior to their arrival is therefore crucial. Were their encounters based on conflict and resistance or, on the contrary, on exchange and reciprocity? Many hypotheses have been put forward on this matter and many papers written. Before we can consider these potential interactions however, we must first ascertain that these different human groups really did meet-an implicit assumption in all these studies, which is, in reality, much less certain than one might think. The population density of the Late Mesolithic groups varied greatly throughout the Mediterranean, and it is possible that some areas were relatively devoid of human presence. Before any Neolithization scenarios can be considered, we must therefore first determine exactly which human groups were present in a given territory at a given time. The precise mapping of sites and the chronological modeling of their occupation enriches our understanding of the Neolithization process by allowing high-resolution regional models to be developed, which alone can determine the timing of potential interactions between Mesolithic and Neolithic groups. Various international research programs have recently produced several hundred new radiocarbon dates, based on selected samples from controlled contexts. The geochronological modelling of these data at the scale of the Western Mediterranean shows contrasting situations, probably related to different social and environmental processes. These results suggest that we should consider a varied range of Neolithization mechanisms, rather than uniform or even binary models.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0246964PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7928471PMC
March 2021

Failure to rescue in patients with distal pancreatectomy: a nationwide analysis of 10,632 patients.

HPB (Oxford) 2021 Feb 8. Epub 2021 Feb 8.

Dijon University Hospital, Clinical Epidemiology/Clinical Trials Unit, Clinical Investigation Center, Dijon F-21000, France.

Background: FTR appears as a major cause of postoperative mortality (POM). Hospital volume has an impact on FTR in pancreatic surgery but no study has investigated this relationship more specifically in DP.

Methods: We analysed patients with DP between 2009 and 2018 through a nationwide database. FTR definition was mortality among patients who experiment major complications. The cutoff between high and low volume centers was 20 pancreatectomies per year.

Results: Some 10,632 patients underwent DP, 5048 (47.5%) were operated in 602 (95.4%) low volume centers and 5584 (52.5%) in 29 (4.6%) high volume centers. Overall FTR occurred in 11.2% of patients and was significantly reduced in high volume centers compared to low volume centers (10.2% vs 12.5%, p = 0.047). In multivariate analysis, surgery in a high volume center was a protective factor for POM (OR = 0.570, CI95% [0.505-0.643], p < 0.001) and also for FTR (OR = 0.550, CI95% [0.486-0.630], p < 0.001).

Conclusion: Hospital volume has a positive impact on FTR in DP. Patients with higher risk of FTR are men, with high modified Charlson comorbidity index, malignant conditions and open procedures.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hpb.2021.02.002DOI Listing
February 2021

Effects of body composition profiles on oncological outcomes and postoperative intraabdominal infection following colorectal cancer surgery.

Surg Obes Relat Dis 2021 Mar 26;17(3):575-584. Epub 2020 Oct 26.

Department of Digestive and Surgical Oncology, University Hospital, Dijon, France.

Background: Anthropometric data as prognostic factors of colorectal cancer are promising but contradictory. The aim of this study was to assess the preoperative body composition profiles as predictive factors for postoperative, oncologic, and inflammation outcomes.

Objectives: We sought to assess the impact of body composition profiles on short- and long-term outcomes and on postoperative inflammatory response in a clinical setting for patients following curative intent surgery for colorectal cancer.

Setting: University hopsital METHODS: We analyzed 122 patients from a prospective cohort (IMACORS) with colorectal cancer undergoing curative-intent surgery from 2011 to 2014. Musculature, total, visceral, and subcutaneous adiposity were measured from a preoperative CT scan and outcomes were compared between profiles.

Results: Preoperative myopenia was an independent predictive factor of recurrence (HR = 3.3 95% CI = 1.6-6.9; P = .002) while subcutaneous adiposity was a protective factor (HR = .4 95% CI = .2-.9; P = .03). No anthropometric measurement was predictive of overall survival and postoperative intra abdominal infection was not determined by body composition profiles. Preoperative and D4 CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with subcutaneous adiposity.

Conclusions: Myopenia and subcutaneous adiposity seemed to have independent and opposite prognostic effects on recurrence. Muscle mass loss may represent a modifiable risk factor while the amount of subcutaneous adipose tissue reflects an energetic storage favorable to face this pathologic process.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soard.2020.10.022DOI Listing
March 2021

Early Neolithic (ca. 5850-4500 cal BC) agricultural diffusion in the Western Mediterranean: An update of archaeobotanical data in SW France.

PLoS One 2020 2;15(4):e0230731. Epub 2020 Apr 2.

TRACES, CNRS, EHESS, Inrap, MCC, Université Toulouse Jean Jaurès, Toulouse, France.

Farming economy was first introduced to the coastal areas of Southern France by Impressa groups (ca. 5850-5650 cal BC), originating from Italy, and subsequently spread to the hinterland by Cardial/Epicardial communities (ca. 5400-4500 cal BC). Fruit and seed remains preserved in archaeological sites provide direct evidence of the botanical resources cultivated and collected by these ancient social groups. But the transition from hunter-gathering to agricultural subsistence strategies is still poorly known in the area, due to insufficient and sometimes outdated archaeobotanical studies. Here we present new results and a critical review of all the available archaeobotanical data, in order to characterize food plant resources, cultivation practices and their variations in time and space. The archaeological dataset is composed of 19 sites (20 site/phases) mostly located in the Mediterranean lowlands. Our results demonstrate that farming economy of the Impressa groups was focused on the cultivation of hulled wheats, with only slight differences compared to their South Italian origins. The contribution of naked cereals increased in the Cardial/Epicardial agriculture, in agreement with the situation in other areas of the Western Mediterranean. The subsistence economy of hinterland sites seems to include a wider contribution of wild fruits and more limited contribution of crops. However, the poor evidence of cultivation activities in the hinterland is likely due first to the difficulties to find and excavate the sites and perform large-scale archaeobotanical sampling. It is likely that agriculture played a significant but variable role between sites and territories.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0230731PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7117749PMC
July 2020

Radiomic feature reproducibility in contrast-enhanced CT of the pancreas is affected by variabilities in scan parameters and manual segmentation.

Eur Radiol 2020 Jan 7;30(1):195-205. Epub 2019 Aug 7.

Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Objectives: This study aims to measure the reproducibility of radiomic features in pancreatic parenchyma and ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) in patients who underwent consecutive contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) scans.

Methods: In this IRB-approved and HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, 37 pairs of scans from 37 unique patients who underwent CECTs within a 2-week interval were included in the analysis of the reproducibility of features derived from pancreatic parenchyma, and a subset of 18 pairs of scans were further analyzed for the reproducibility of features derived from PDAC. In each patient, pancreatic parenchyma and pancreatic tumor (when present) were manually segmented by two radiologists independently. A total of 266 radiomic features were extracted from the pancreatic parenchyma and tumor region and also the volume and diameter of the tumor. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was calculated to assess feature reproducibility for each patient in three scenarios: (1) different radiologists, same CECT; (2) same radiologist, different CECTs; and (3) different radiologists, different CECTs.

Results: Among pancreatic parenchyma-derived features, using a threshold of CCC > 0.90, 58/266 (21.8%) and 48/266 (18.1%) features met the threshold for scenario 1, 14/266 (5.3%) and 15/266 (5.6%) for scenario 2, and 14/266 (5.3%) and 10/266 (3.8%) for scenario 3. Among pancreatic tumor-derived features, 11/268 (4.1%) and 17/268 (6.3%) features met the threshold for scenario 1, 1/268 (0.4%) and 5/268 (1.9%) features met the threshold for scenario 2, and no features for scenario 3 met the threshold, respectively.

Conclusions: Variations between CECT scans affected radiomic feature reproducibility to a greater extent than variation in segmentation. A smaller number of pancreatic tumor-derived radiomic features were reproducible compared with pancreatic parenchyma-derived radiomic features under the same conditions.

Key Points: • For pancreatic-derived radiomic features from contrast-enhanced CT (CECT), fewer than 25% are reproducible (with a threshold of CCC < 0.9) in a clinical heterogeneous dataset. • Variations between CECT scans affected the number of reproducible radiomic features to a greater extent than variations in radiologist segmentation. • A smaller number of pancreatic tumor-derived radiomic features were reproducible compared with pancreatic parenchyma-derived radiomic features under the same conditions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-019-06381-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7127865PMC
January 2020

Diaphragmatic paralysis in young children: A literature review.

Pediatr Pulmonol 2019 09 18;54(9):1367-1373. Epub 2019 Jun 18.

Service de pneumologie, allergologie pédiatrique. Hôpital Femme Mère Enfant, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France.

Diaphragmatic paralysis (DP) is a rare cause of respiratory distress in young children. In the first years of life, the main cause is phrenic nerve injury after cardiothoracic surgery or obstetrical trauma. DP usually presents as respiratory distress. Asymmetrical thorax elevation, difficulty weaning from mechanical ventilation, pulmonary atelectasis, and repeated pulmonary infections are other suggestive signs or complications. DP is usually suspected on chest X-ray showing abnormal hemidiaphragm elevation. Although fluoroscopy was considered the gold standard for DP confirmation, it has gradually been replaced by ultrasound, which can be done at the bedside. Some electrophysiological tools may be useful for a better characterization of phrenic nerve injury and chance of recovery. The management of DP is mainly based on clinical severity. In mild asymptomatic cases, DP may only require close monitoring. In more severe cases, adequate ventilatory support and/or surgical diaphragmatic plication may be needed. Electrophysiological tools may help clinicians assess the ideal timing for diaphragmatic plication.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ppul.24383DOI Listing
September 2019

Short-term reproducibility of radiomic features in liver parenchyma and liver malignancies on contrast-enhanced CT imaging.

Abdom Radiol (NY) 2018 12;43(12):3271-3278

Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY, USA.

Purpose: To evaluate the short-term reproducibility of radiomic features in liver parenchyma and liver cancers in patients who underwent consecutive contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) with intravenous iodinated contrast within 2 weeks by chance.

Methods: The Institutional Review Board approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study and waived the requirement for patients' informed consent. Patients were included if they had a liver malignancy (liver metastasis, n = 22, intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, n = 10, and hepatocellular carcinoma, n = 6), had two consecutive CECT within 14 days, and had no prior or intervening therapy. Liver tumors and liver parenchyma were segmented and radiomic features (n = 254) were extracted. The number of reproducible features (with concordance correlation coefficients > 0.9) was calculated for patient subgroups with different variations in contrast injection rate and pixel resolution.

Results: The number of reproducible radiomic features decreased with increasing variations in contrast injection rate and pixel resolution. When including all CECTs with injection rates differences of less than 15% vs. up to 50%, 63/254 vs. 0/254 features were reproducible for liver parenchyma and 68/254 vs. 50/254 features were reproducible for malignancies. When including all CT with pixel resolution differences of 0-5% or 0-15%, 20/254 vs. 0/254 features were reproducible for liver parenchyma; 34/254 liver malignancy features were reproducible with pixel differences up to 15%.

Conclusion: A greater number of liver malignancy radiomic features were reproducible compared to liver parenchyma features, but the proportion of reproducible features decreased with increasing variations in contrast injection rates and pixel resolution.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00261-018-1600-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6209534PMC
December 2018