Publications by authors named "Thomas Kreitler"

10 Publications

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DIPSBC--data integration platform for systems biology collaborations.

BMC Bioinformatics 2012 May 8;13:85. Epub 2012 May 8.

Department of Vertebrate Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Ihnestr. 63-73, 14195 Berlin, Germany.

Background: Modern biomedical research is often organized in collaborations involving labs worldwide. In particular in systems biology, complex molecular systems are analyzed that require the generation and interpretation of heterogeneous data for their explanation, for example ranging from gene expression studies and mass spectrometry measurements to experimental techniques for detecting molecular interactions and functional assays. XML has become the most prominent format for representing and exchanging these data. However, besides the development of standards there is still a fundamental lack of data integration systems that are able to utilize these exchange formats, organize the data in an integrative way and link it with applications for data interpretation and analysis.

Results: We have developed DIPSBC, an interactive data integration platform supporting collaborative research projects, based on Foswiki, Solr/Lucene, and specific helper applications. We describe the main features of the implementation and highlight the performance of the system with several use cases. All components of the system are platform independent and open-source developments and thus can be easily adopted by researchers. An exemplary installation of the platform which also provides several helper applications and detailed instructions for system usage and setup is available at http://dipsbc.molgen.mpg.de.

Conclusions: DIPSBC is a data integration platform for medium-scale collaboration projects that has been tested already within several research collaborations. Because of its modular design and the incorporation of XML data formats it is highly flexible and easy to use.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2105-13-85DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3424966PMC
May 2012

PROTEOMER: A workflow-optimized laboratory information management system for 2-D electrophoresis-centered proteomics.

Proteomics 2009 Apr;9(7):1795-808

Institute for Human Genetics, Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

In recent years proteomics became increasingly important to functional genomics. Although a large amount of data is generated by high throughput large-scale techniques, a connection of these mostly heterogeneous data from different analytical platforms and of different experiments is limited. Data mining procedures and algorithms are often insufficient to extract meaningful results from large datasets and therefore limit the exploitation of the generated biological information. In our proteomic core facility, which almost exclusively focuses on 2-DE/MS-based proteomics, we developed a proteomic database custom tailored to our needs aiming at connecting MS protein identification information to 2-DE derived protein expression profiles. The tools developed should not only enable an automatic evaluation of single experiments, but also link multiple 2-DE experiments with MS-data on different levels and thereby helping to create a comprehensive network of our proteomics data. Therefore the key feature of our "PROTEOMER" database is its high cross-referencing capacity, enabling integration of a wide range of experimental data. To illustrate the workflow and utility of the system, two practical examples are provided to demonstrate that proper data cross-referencing can transform information into biological knowledge.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmic.200800522DOI Listing
April 2009

A proteomic method for the analysis of changes in protein concentrations in response to systemic perturbations using metabolic incorporation of stable isotopes and mass spectrometry.

Proteomics 2005 Sep;5(14):3563-70

Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin, Germany.

While several techniques exist for assessing quantitative differences among proteomes representing different cell states, methods for assessing how these differences are mediated are largely missing. We present a method that allows one to differentiate between cellular processes, such as protein synthesis, degradation and PTMs which affect protein concentrations. An induced systemic perturbation of a cell culture was coupled to a replacement of the growth medium to one highly enriched in the stable isotope 15N. The relative abundance of the 15N- and 14N-enriched forms of proteins, isolated from cell cultures harvested at time points following the onset of the perturbation, were determined by MS. Alterations in protein synthesis and degradation were quantified by comparing proteins isolated from perturbed and unperturbed cultures, respectively. The method was evaluated by subjecting HeLa cells to heat stress. As expected, a number of known heat shock proteins (Hsp) increased in concentration during heat stress. For Hsp27, increased de novo synthesis accounted for the concentration increase, while for Hsp70, decreased degradation accounted for the increase. A protein that was detected only after prolonged heat stress, vimentin, was not primarily synthesized de novo, but appeared rather as a result of PTM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmic.200401193DOI Listing
September 2005

High heterogeneity within the ribosomal proteins of the Arabidopsis thaliana 80S ribosome.

Plant Mol Biol 2005 Mar;57(4):577-91

Max-Planck-Institute for Molecular Genetics, Ihnestr. 73, D-14195 Berlin, Germany.

Proteomic studies have addressed the composition of plant chloroplast ribosomes and 70S ribosomes from the unicellular organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii But comprehensive characterization of cytoplasmic 80S ribosomes from higher plants has been lacking. We have used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) to analyse the cytoplasmic 80S ribosomes from the model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Of the 80 ribosomal protein families predicted to comprise the cytoplasmic 80S ribosome, we have confirmed the presence of 61; specifically, 27 (84%) of the small 40S subunit and 34 (71%) of the large 60S subunit. Nearly half (45%) of the ribosomal proteins identified are represented by two or more distinct spots in the 2-DE gel indicating that these proteins are either post-translationally modified or present as different isoforms. Consistently, MS-based protein identification revealed that at least one-third (34%) of the identified ribosomal protein families showed expression of two or more family members. In addition, we have identified a number of non-ribosomal proteins that co-migrate with the plant 80S ribosomes during gradient centrifugation suggesting their possible association with the 80S ribosomes. Among them, RACK1 has recently been proposed to be a ribosome-associated protein that promotes efficient translation in yeast. The study, thus provides the basis for further investigation into the function of the other identified non-ribosomal proteins as well as the biological meaning of the various ribosomal protein isoforms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11103-005-0699-3DOI Listing
March 2005

Proteome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry.

Proteomics 2005 May;5(7):1902-13

Max-Planck-Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin, Germany.

In the present study we show results of a large-scale proteome analysis of the recently sequenced plant Arabidopsis thaliana. On the basis of a previously published sequential protein extraction protocol, we prepared protein extracts from eight different A. thaliana tissues (primary leaf, leaf, stem, silique, seedling, seed, root, and inflorescence) and analysed these by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A total of 6000 protein spots, from three of these tissues, namely primary leaf, silique and seedling, were excised and the contained proteins were analysed by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting. This resulted in the identification of the proteins contained in 2943 spots, which were found to be products of 663 different genes. In this report we present and discuss the methodological and biological results of our plant proteome analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pmic.200401062DOI Listing
May 2005

Integrated and sequence-ordered BAC- and YAC-based physical maps for the rat genome.

Genome Res 2004 Apr;14(4):766-79

Genome Sciences Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada V5Z 4E6.

As part of the effort to sequence the genome of Rattus norvegicus, we constructed a physical map comprised of fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the CHORI-230 BAC library. These BAC clones provide approximately 13-fold redundant coverage of the genome and have been assembled into 376 fingerprint contigs. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) map was also constructed and aligned with the BAC map via fingerprinted BAC and P1 artificial chromosome clones (PACs) sharing interspersed repetitive sequence markers with the YAC-based physical map. We have annotated 95% of the fingerprint map clones in contigs with coordinates on the version 3.1 rat genome sequence assembly, using BAC-end sequences and in silico mapping methods. These coordinates have allowed anchoring 358 of the 376 fingerprint map contigs onto the sequence assembly. Of these, 324 contigs are anchored to rat genome sequences localized to chromosomes, and 34 contigs are anchored to unlocalized portions of the rat sequence assembly. The remaining 18 contigs, containing 54 clones, still require placement. The fingerprint map is a high-resolution integrative data resource that provides genome-ordered associations among BAC, YAC, and PAC clones and the assembled sequence of the rat genome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gr.2336604DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC383324PMC
April 2004

Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution.

Nature 2004 Apr;428(6982):493-521

Human Genome Sequencing Center, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, MS BCM226, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. http://www.hgsc.bcm.tmc.edu

The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90% of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02426DOI Listing
April 2004

Applications of interspersed repeat sequence polymerase chain reaction.

Methods Mol Biol 2004 ;255:113-29

Experimental Genetics of Cardiovascular Diseases, Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1385/1-59259-752-1:113DOI Listing
May 2004

Sequencing and chromosomal localization of Fabp6 and an intronless Fabp6 segment in the rat.

Mol Biol Rep 2003 Sep;30(3):173-6

Department of Laboratory Animal Science, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80166, 3508 TD Utrecht, The Netherlands.

The fatty acid binding protein 6 gene (Fabp6) codes for ileal lipid binding protein. After sequencing of rat Fabp6, the gene was localized in a radiation hybrid (RH) map on chromosome 10. An intronless Fabp6 segment was found in four related rat inbred strains (SHR; SHRSP; WKY; and OKA), but not in 62 other rat inbred strains. The intronless Fabp6 segment, which might be a pseudogene of Fabp6, was localized on rat chromosome 15.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/a:1024968606162DOI Listing
September 2003

Conserved synteny in rat and mouse for a blood pressure QTL on human chromosome 17.

Hypertension 2002 Jun;39(6):1050-2

Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

Evidence for blood pressure quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on rat chromosome 10 has been found in multiple independent studies. Analysis of the homologous region on human chromosome 17 revealed significant linkage to blood pressure. The critical segment on human chromosome 17 spans a large interval containing the genes Itga2b, Gfap, and Itgb3. Therefore, findings in the rat may help to refine the position of blood pressure-regulating loci, assuming a common molecular cause across species. However, it has recently been suggested that the gene order in human, rat, and mouse is not conserved in this region, leaving uncertainty about the overlap of the blood pressure- regulating region between human chromosome 17 and rat chromosome 10. We have performed a detailed comparative analysis among human, mouse, and rat, defining the segment in question, by obtaining gene structure information in silico and by radiation hybrid mapping. It is of interest that this region also contains Wnk4, a gene previously identified to cause pseudohypoaldosteronism type II and human hypertension. Our results definitively show that the conserved synteny extends among human chromosome 17, rat chromosome 10, and mouse chromosome 11, demonstrating an overlap between previously localized blood pressure QTLs in humans and rats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/01.hyp.0000018909.50074.45DOI Listing
June 2002