Thomas Gyan, MPH, PhD - Ghana Health Service/Kintampo Health Research Centre - Principal Health Research Officer/Project coordinator

Thomas Gyan

MPH, PhD

Ghana Health Service/Kintampo Health Research Centre

Principal Health Research Officer/Project coordinator

Kintampo, Brong Ahafo | Ghana

Main Specialties: Epidemiology, Pediatrics, Public Health

Thomas Gyan, MPH, PhD - Ghana Health Service/Kintampo Health Research Centre - Principal Health Research Officer/Project coordinator

Thomas Gyan

MPH, PhD

Introduction

Primary Affiliation: Ghana Health Service/Kintampo Health Research Centre - Kintampo, Brong Ahafo , Ghana

Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Sep 2018
University of Western Australia
PhD
Jul 2007
Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
MPH
Aug 2002
University for Development Studies
BA

Publications

15Publications

146Reads

983Profile Views

157PubMed Central Citations

The influence of socioeconomic factors on choice of infant male circumcision provider in rural Ghana; a community level population based study

10.1186/s12887-017-0937-2

BMC Pediatrics

Background: The influence of socio-economic determinants on choice of infant male circumcision provider is not known in areas with high population coverage such as rural Africa. The overall aim of this study was to determine the key socio-economic factors which influence the choice of infant male circumcision provider in rural Ghana. Methods: The study investigated the effect of family income, distance to health facility, and cost of the circumcision on choice of infant male circumcision provider in rural Ghana. Data from 2847 circumcised infant males aged under 12 weeks and their families were analysed in a population-based cross-sectional study conducted from May to December 2012 in rural Ghana. Multivariable logistic regression models were adjusted for income status, distance to health facility, cost of circumcision, religion, maternal education, and maternal age. Results: Infants from the lowest income households (325, 84.0%) were more likely to receive circumcision from an informal provider compared to infants from the highest income households (260, 42.4%) even after adjusting for religious affiliation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.42, 95% CI 3.12–6.27 p = <0.001). There appeared to be a dose response with increasing risk of receiving a circumcision from an informal provider as distance to a health facility increased (aOR 1.25, 95 CI 1.30–1.38 P = <0.001). Only 9.0% (34) of families in the lowest socio-economic quintile received free circumcision services compared to 27.9% (171) of the highest income families. Conclusions: The Government of Ghana and Non-Government Organisations should consider additional support to poor families so they can access high quality free infant male circumcision in rural Ghana. Keywords: Socio-economic, Infant, Male, Circumcision, Community, Population-based, Ghana

View Article
August 2017
1 Read

Healthcare seeking patterns of families of infants with circumcision-related morbidities from two population-based cohort studies in Ghana

10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018185

BMJ Open

Objective This study assessed healthcare seeking patterns of families of infants with circumcision-related morbidities and families of infants with acute illnesses in rural Ghana. Design Two population-based cohort studies. Setting Brong Ahafo Region of central rural Ghana. Participants A total of 22 955 infants enrolled in a large population-based trial (Neovita trial) from 16 August 2010 to 7 November 2011 and 3141 infants in a circumcision study from 21 May 2012 to 31 December 2012. Primary outcome Care seeking for circumcision-related morbidities and acute illnesses unrelated to circumcision. Results Two hundred and thirty (8.1%) infants from the circumcision study had circumcision-related morbidities and 6265 (27.3%) infants from the Neovita study had acute illnesses unrelated to circumcision. A much lower proportion (35, 15.2%) of families of infants with circumcision-related morbidities sought healthcare compared with families of infants with acute illnesses in the Neovita study (5520, 88.1%). More families sought care from formal providers (24, 69%) compared with informal providers (11, 31%) for circumcision-related morbidities. There were no obvious determinants of care seeking for acute illnesses or circumcision-related morbidities in the population. Conclusions Government and non-government organisations need to improve awareness about the complications and care seeking needed for circumcisionrelated morbidities.

View Article
August 2017
2 Reads

A cohort study of low birth weight and health outcomes in the first year of life, Ghana

dx.doi.org/10.2471/BLT.16.180273

WHO Bulletin

Objective To investigate the effect of birth weight on infant mortality, illness and care seeking in rural Ghana. Methods Using randomized controlled trial data, we compared infants weighing 2.00–2.49, 1.50–1.99 and < 1.50 kg with non-low-birthweight infants. We generated adjusted mortality hazard ratios (aHR), adjusted illness rate ratios (aRR) and adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for health-facility admissions and absence of care seeking for four time periods: infancy, the neonatal period, early infancy and late infancy – represented by ages of 0–364, 0–27, 28–182 and 183–364 days, respectively. Findings Among 22 906 infants, compared with non-low-birth-weight infants: (i) infants weighing 2.00–2.49, 1.50–1.99 and < 1.50 kg were about two (aHR: 2.13; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.76–2.59), eight (aHR: 8.21; 95% CI: 6.26–10.76) and 25 (aHR: 25.38; 95% CI: 18.36–35.10) times more likely to die in infancy, respectively; (ii) those born weighing < 1.50 kg were about 48 (aHR: 48.45; 95% CI: 32.81–71.55) and eight (aHR: 8.42; 95% CI: 3.09–22.92) times more likely to die in the neonatal period and late infancy, respectively; (iii) those born weighing 1.50–1.99 kg (aRR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.27–1.95) or < 1.50 kg (aRR: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.13–2.21) had higher neonatal illness rates; and (iv) for those born weighing 1.50–1.99 kg, care was less likely to be sought in the neonatal period (aOR: 3.30; 95% CI: 1.98–5.48) and early infancy (aOR : 1.74; 95% CI: 1.26–2.39). Conclusion For low-birth-weight infants in Ghana, strategies to minimize mortality and improve care seeking are needed.

View Article
April 2017
1 Read

Determinants of morbidity associated with infant male circumcision: community-level population-based study in rural Ghana.

Trop Med Int Health 2017 03 12;22(3):312-322. Epub 2017 Jan 12.

School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tmi.12829DOI Listing
March 2017
3 Reads
2 Citations
2.330 Impact Factor

Neonatal vaccination of low birthweight infants in Ghana.

Arch Dis Child 2017 Feb 13;102(2):145-151. Epub 2016 Oct 13.

Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2016-311227DOI Listing
February 2017
7 Reads
2 Citations
2.900 Impact Factor

Health service provider education and/or training in infant male circumcision to improve short- and long-term morbidity outcomes: protocol for systematic review.

Syst Rev 2016 Mar 1;5:41. Epub 2016 Mar 1.

School of Paediatrics and Child Health, The University of Western Australia, Level 4, Administration Building Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Roberts Road, Subiaco, 6008, Western Australia.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13643-016-0216-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4774100PMC
March 2016
4 Reads

Evaluating the implementation of community volunteer assessment and referral of sick babies: lessons learned from the Ghana Newhints home visits cluster randomized controlled trial.

Health Policy Plan 2014 Sep;29 Suppl 2:ii114-27

Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P.O. Box 200, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana, Department of Public Health, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Department of Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK and Institute of Child Health, University College London, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czu080DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4202912PMC
September 2014
8 Reads
3 Citations
3.470 Impact Factor

The Effectiveness of Population Based Risk Reduction Programs and Services in Reducing Risky Sexual Behavior among Young People in Developing Countries.

JBI Libr Syst Rev 2011;9(64 Suppl):1-17

1. Kintampo Health Research Centre, Kintampo, Ghana 2. Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA 3. The Kintampo Health Research Centre (KHRC) Ghana: An Affiliate Centre of the Joanna Briggs Institute.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2011
6 Reads

Vitamin A supplements are well tolerated with the pentavalent vaccine.

Vaccine 2008 Dec;26(51):6608-13

Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2008.09.037DOI Listing
December 2008
4 Citations
3.624 Impact Factor

How did formative research inform the development of a home-based neonatal care intervention in rural Ghana?

J Perinatol 2008 Dec;28 Suppl 2:S38-45

Nutrition and Public Health Intervention Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Population health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jp.2008.172DOI Listing
December 2008
12 Reads
34 Citations
2.350 Impact Factor