Thomas Chatzintounas, MD PhD -   Neurologist at Private Practice (Interbalcan European Medical Center Thessaloniki & Xanthi, Greece) - MD PhD Senior Consultant Neurologist

Thomas Chatzintounas

MD PhD

Neurologist at Private Practice (Interbalcan European Medical Center Thessaloniki & Xanthi, Greece)

MD PhD Senior Consultant Neurologist

Thessaloniki, Macedonia | Greece

Main Specialties: Neurology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1034-5750

Thomas Chatzintounas, MD PhD -   Neurologist at Private Practice (Interbalcan European Medical Center Thessaloniki & Xanthi, Greece) - MD PhD Senior Consultant Neurologist

Thomas Chatzintounas

MD PhD

Introduction

PhD in Democritus University of Thrace. Member of the Editorial Board in CPQ Neurology and Psychology in Cient Periodique. He worked as Postdoctoral fellow in A’ Department of Neurology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. He has been a director for years in Neurologic clinic of 492 General Military Hospital & 424 General Military Training Hospital.

Primary Affiliation: Neurologist at Private Practice (Interbalcan European Medical Center Thessaloniki & Xanthi, Greece) - Thessaloniki, Macedonia , Greece

Specialties:

Research Interests:

Metrics

Number of Publications

6

Publications

Number of Profile Views

110

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

8

Reads

Number of PubMed Central Citations

4

PubMed Central Citations

Education

Jan 2004 - Jan 2007
Democritus University of Thrace
Doctor of Philosophy - PhD
Sep 2018
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Experience

Feb 2018 - Nov 2018
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTH)
Postdoctoral fellow
Aug 2002 - Sep 2007
492 General Military Hospital
Director of Neurologic Clinic
Aug 1999 - Aug 2002
424 General Military Training Hospital
Director of Neurologic Clinic
Mar 2017
Interbalcan European Medical Center Thessaloniki
MD PhD Senior Consultant Neurologist
Jun 1997
Neurology practise - Electromyography (EMG) & Electroencephalography (EEG) Laboratory Electrodiagnostic lab
at Private Practice

Publications

6Publications

8Reads

4PubMed Central Citations

Is Underdiagnosed, Chronic, Latent Infection with Toxoplasma gondii Responsible for the Development of Several, Common Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders? Assessment of Manipulation Theory. Review and Metanalysis of the Available Literature.

Chatzintounas Thomas. “Is Underdiagnosed, Chronic, Latent Infection with Toxoplasma gondii Responsible for the Development of Several, Common Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders? Assessment of Manipulation Theory. Review and Metanalysis of the Available Literature”. EC Neurology 10.9 (2018): 835-

EC Neurology

Abstract Toxoplasmosis is an important, widespread, parasitic infection caused by Toxoplasma gondii. It is well known the danger of reactivation of the latent infection in immunosuppressed individuals (e.g. AIDS patients). Although the chronic infection in immunocompetent patients or seropositive patients, usually considered as asymptomatic or relatively benign, is now suspected to be a risk factor for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. We aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available literature to estimate the wide range of CNS morbidity due to latent chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii, which may be underdiagnosed. Keywords: Toxoplasmosis; Toxoplasma gondii; Latent Chronic Infection; Protozoal Infection; Neurological Disorders; Psychiatric Disorders; Manipulation; Riskier Behavior

View Article
August 2018
42 Reads

A Case of Peculiar Kinetic Behavior in a Patient with Acute Neck Pain. Could this be Considered as an Indicative Sign of Underlying Pathology in Posterior Cranial Fossa, the Clivus or in the Upper Part of Neck?

https://www.ecronicon.com/ecne/volume10-issue4.php

EC NEUROLOGY

Abstract Neck pain is a very common symptom in a vast variety of clinical conditions, that a doctor could face in daily clinical practice. We describe a 23-year old man with severe, acute neck pain accompanied by impulsive, peculiar kinetic behavior, similar to conversion disorder, whose MRI-scan revealed an underlying, extensive and invasive cervical lymphoma. We witnessed of the same peculiar kinetic behavior, in two other patients with other underlying pathologies, which made us wonder if, this could be considered as an ¨indicative sign¨ of underlying pathology in posterior cranial fossa, the clivus or in the upper part of neck, prompting in that way doctors in the emergency department to carry out a thorough clinical-laboratory check. Keywords: Neck Pain; Kinetic Behavior; Hodgkin’s Lymphoma; Sign.

View Article
February 2018
52 Reads

Common carotid intima media thickness as a marker of clinical severity in patients with symptomatic extracranial carotid artery stenosis.

Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2009 Apr 25;111(3):246-50. Epub 2008 Nov 25.

Department of Neurology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupoli, Greece.

View Article
April 2009
8 Reads
4 PubMed Central Citations(source)
1.248 Impact Factor

¨ Ultrasound characteristics of carotid artery disease in ishaemic stroke¨

DOI: 10.12681/eadd/21129

National Archive of PhD Theses

Background and Purpose:Various studies suggest that the increased common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT), as well as the lower plaque echogenicity are well known risk factors for stroke/transient ischemic attacks. In the present study we investigated the existence of potential cross-correlation or association between carotid plaque echogenicity and increased common carotid artery intima-media thickness with the severity of ischaemic stroke and the remaining disability in patients with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis and recent ischemic stroke of the anterior circulation. Methods: One hundred and two patients (mean age 66.95 ± 7.85) with recent, acute and first-ever ischaemic attack justified with CT-scan, underwent a carotid ultrasound examination to quantify the degree of stenosis. From the study were excluded patients with lacunar infarcts or with strokes of cardiac origin, or patients that did not present atheromatic plaques or symptomatic carotid artery stenosis on the infarct side. All subjects had an IMT measurement at the far wall of both CCAs and the MGV was obtained through 3D ultrasound image analysis of plaques using histogram. Stroke severity assessed according to definitions, procedures and scoring system of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and of Barthel Abulatory Index (BI). The NIHSS assessed on hospital admission and BI at discharge. Statistical analysis was performed using the STATA version 9.2 for windows (Stata Corp. Texas, USA). All continuous variables were appropriately adjusted to approach normality. Correlation calculations were performed by chi-square test. The null hypothesis was tested at a level of p<0.05. All factors that contributed to the outcome in the initial univariate analyses at p <0.1 were included in the multivariate model as candidate variables and then removed by backward stepwise selection procedure. In the final multivariate analyses, statistical significance was achieved if p<0.05. To confirm the robustness of multivariate models, we repeated all multivariate analyses using a forward procedure. Results: In the analysis of the results we used the linear regression, which showed that, the CCA - IMT had a remarkable positive cross-correlation with the NIHSS Stroke Scale (p <0.001) and a remarkable negative cross-correlation with the Barthel Abulatory Index (BI) (p < 0.001). No cross-correlation was found between MGV and the aforementioned disability stroke scales ( p = 0.46 and p = 0.75 respectively). Neither the percentage of carotid stenosis had a significant effect on stroke scale gradings. There was no correlation of CCA - IMT with age ( p = 0.97), with sex ( p = 0.31), with hypertension (p=0.28 ), with diabetes mellitus (p = 0.72) and with lipids (p = 0.69). The only positive correlation was between ΒΜΙ and CCA-IMT (p = 0.03), in comparison of two variables (bivariate analysis).

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July 2007