Publications by authors named "Thomas A Neumann"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Accelerating Ice Loss From Peripheral Glaciers in North Greenland.

Geophys Res Lett 2022 Jun 16;49(12):e2022GL098915. Epub 2022 Jun 16.

Department of Geosciences and Natural Resources University of Copenhagen Copenhagen Denmark.

In recent decades, Greenland's peripheral glaciers have experienced large-scale mass loss, resulting in a substantial contribution to sea level rise. While their total area of Greenland ice cover is relatively small (4%), their mass loss is disproportionally large compared to the Greenland ice sheet. Satellite altimetry from Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) and ICESat-2 shows that mass loss from Greenland's peripheral glaciers increased from 27.2 ± 6.2 Gt/yr (February 2003-October 2009) to 42.3 ± 6.2 Gt/yr (October 2018-December 2021). These relatively small glaciers now constitute 11 ± 2% of Greenland's ice loss and contribute to global sea level rise. In the period October 2018-December 2021, mass loss increased by a factor of four for peripheral glaciers in North Greenland. While peripheral glacier mass loss is widespread, we also observe a complex regional pattern where increases in precipitation at high altitudes have partially counteracted increases in melt at low altitude.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2022GL098915DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9286807PMC
June 2022

The Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite - 2 Mission: A Global Geolocated Photon Product Derived From the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System.

Remote Sens Environ 2019 Nov;233

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD United States.

The Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite - 2 (ICESat-2) observatory was launched on 15 September 2018 to measure ice sheet and glacier elevation change, sea ice freeboard, and enable the determination of the heights of Earth's forests. ICESat-2's laser altimeter, the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) uses green (532 nm) laser light and single-photon sensitive detection to measure time of flight and subsequently surface height along each of its six beams. In this paper, we describe the major components of ATLAS, including the transmitter, the receiver and the components of the timing system. We present the major components of the ICESat-2 observatory, including the Global Positioning System, star trackers and inertial measurement unit. The ICESat-2 Level 1B data product (ATL02) provides the precise photon round-trip time of flight, among other data. The ICESat-2 Level 2A data product (ATL03) combines the photon times of flight with the observatory position and attitude to determine the geodetic location (i.e. the latitude, longitude and height) of the ground bounce point of photons detected by ATLAS. The ATL03 data product is used by higher-level (Level 3A) surface-specific data products to determine glacier and ice sheet height, sea ice freeboard, vegetation canopy height, ocean surface topography, and inland water body height.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2019.111325DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6839705PMC
November 2019

Greenland subglacial drainage evolution regulated by weakly connected regions of the bed.

Nat Commun 2016 12 19;7:13903. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755, USA.

Penetration of surface meltwater to the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet each summer causes an initial increase in ice speed due to elevated basal water pressure, followed by slowdown in late summer that continues into fall and winter. While this seasonal pattern is commonly explained by an evolution of the subglacial drainage system from an inefficient distributed to efficient channelized configuration, mounting evidence indicates that subglacial channels are unable to explain important aspects of hydrodynamic coupling in late summer and fall. Here we use numerical models of subglacial drainage and ice flow to show that limited, gradual leakage of water and lowering of water pressure in weakly connected regions of the bed can explain the dominant features in late and post melt season ice dynamics. These results suggest that a third weakly connected drainage component should be included in the conceptual model of subglacial hydrology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13903DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5187425PMC
December 2016

Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

Nature 2014 Oct;514(7520):80-3

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, USA.

Seasonal acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet is influenced by the dynamic response of the subglacial hydrologic system to variability in meltwater delivery to the bed via crevasses and moulins (vertical conduits connecting supraglacial water to the bed of the ice sheet). As the melt season progresses, the subglacial hydrologic system drains supraglacial meltwater more efficiently, decreasing basal water pressure and moderating the ice velocity response to surface melting. However, limited direct observations of subglacial water pressure mean that the spatiotemporal evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system remains poorly understood. Here we show that ice velocity is well correlated with moulin hydraulic head but is out of phase with that of nearby (0.3-2 kilometres away) boreholes, indicating that moulins connect to an efficient, channelized component of the subglacial hydrologic system, which exerts the primary control on diurnal and multi-day changes in ice velocity. Our simultaneous measurements of moulin and borehole hydraulic head and ice velocity in the Paakitsoq region of western Greenland show that decreasing trends in ice velocity during the latter part of the melt season cannot be explained by changes in the ability of moulin-connected channels to convey supraglacial melt. Instead, these observations suggest that decreasing late-season ice velocity may be caused by changes in connectivity in unchannelized regions of the subglacial hydrologic system. Understanding this spatiotemporal variability in subglacial pressures is increasingly important because melt-season dynamics affect ice velocity beyond the conclusion of the melt season.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13796DOI Listing
October 2014

Preservation of a preglacial landscape under the center of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

Science 2014 Apr 17;344(6182):402-5. Epub 2014 Apr 17.

Department of Geology and Rubenstein School of the Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA.

Continental ice sheets typically sculpt landscapes via erosion; under certain conditions, ancient landscapes can be preserved beneath ice and can survive extensive and repeated glaciation. We used concentrations of atmospherically produced cosmogenic beryllium-10, carbon, and nitrogen to show that ancient soil has been preserved in basal ice for millions of years at the center of the ice sheet at Summit, Greenland. This finding suggests ice sheet stability through the Pleistocene (i.e., the past 2.7 million years). The preservation of this soil implies that the ice has been nonerosive and frozen to the bed for much of that time, that there was no substantial exposure of central Greenland once the ice sheet became fully established, and that preglacial landscapes can remain preserved for long periods under continental ice sheets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1249047DOI Listing
April 2014

Delegation-better safe than sorry.

Authors:
Thomas A Neumann

AAOHN J 2010 Aug;58(8):321-2

Viterbo University, La Crosse, WI, USA.

Occupational health nurses, like other registered nurses, often must decide whether to delegate. They must be familiar with the laws and standards governing delegation of nursing tasks. Many different resources exist for obtaining this information (e.g., jurisdictional nurse practice acts, position papers from boards of nursing, and publications from professional and regulatory organizations). Registered nurses who delegate must know which tasks may be delegated, how to determine the competence of delegates, and the level of supervision necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/08910162-20100728-04DOI Listing
August 2010
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