Publications by authors named "Thibaud Metzger"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ubiquitin Receptor Protein UBASH3B Drives Aurora B Recruitment to Mitotic Microtubules.

Dev Cell 2016 Jan;36(1):63-78

Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique UMR 7104, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U964, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch, France. Electronic address:

Mitosis ensures equal segregation of the genome and is controlled by a variety of ubiquitylation signals on substrate proteins. However, it remains unexplored how the versatile ubiquitin code is read out during mitotic progression. Here, we identify the ubiquitin receptor protein UBASH3B as an important regulator of mitosis. UBASH3B interacts with ubiquitylated Aurora B, one of the main kinases regulating chromosome segregation, and controls its subcellular localization but not protein levels. UBASH3B is a limiting factor in this pathway and is sufficient to localize Aurora B to microtubules prior to anaphase. Importantly, targeting Aurora B to microtubules by UBASH3B is necessary for the timing and fidelity of chromosome segregation in human cells. Our findings uncover an important mechanism defining how ubiquitin attachment to a substrate protein is decoded during mitosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2015.12.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5400057PMC
January 2016

CUL3 and protein kinases: insights from PLK1/KLHL22 interaction.

Cell Cycle 2013 Jul;12(14):2291-6

Institute of Genetics and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Illkirch, France.

Posttranslational mechanisms drive fidelity of cellular processes. Phosphorylation and ubiquitination of substrates represent very common, covalent, posttranslational modifications and are often co-regulated. Phosphorylation may play a critical role both by directly regulating E3-ubiquitin ligases and/or by ensuring specificity of the ubiquitination substrate. Importantly, many kinases are not only critical regulatory components of these pathways but also represent themselves the direct ubiquitination substrates. Recent data suggest the role of CUL3-based ligases in both proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of protein kinases. Our own recent study identified the mitotic kinase PLK1 as a direct target of the CUL3 E3-ligase complex containing BTB-KELCH adaptor protein KLHL22. (1) In this study, we aim at gaining mechanistic insights into CUL3-mediated regulation of the substrates, in particular protein kinases, by analyzing mechanisms of interaction between KLHL22 and PLK1. We find that kinase activity of PLK1 is redundant for its targeting for CUL3-ubiquitination. Moreover, CUL3/KLHL22 may contact 2 distinct motifs within PLK1 protein, consistent with the bivalent mode of substrate targeting found in other CUL3-based complexes. We discuss these findings in the context of the existing knowledge on other protein kinases and substrates targeted by CUL3-based E3-ligases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/cc.25369DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3755079PMC
July 2013

Ubiquitylation-dependent localization of PLK1 in mitosis.

Nat Cell Biol 2013 Apr 3;15(4):430-9. Epub 2013 Mar 3.

Institute of Biochemistry, ETH Zurich, Schafmattstrasse 18, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland.

Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) critically regulates mitosis through its dynamic localization to kinetochores, centrosomes and the midzone. The polo-box domain (PBD) and activity of PLK1 mediate its recruitment to mitotic structures, but the mechanisms regulating PLK1 dynamics remain poorly understood. Here, we identify PLK1 as a target of the cullin 3 (CUL3)-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, containing the BTB adaptor KLHL22, which regulates chromosome alignment and PLK1 kinetochore localization but not PLK1 stability. In the absence of KLHL22, PLK1 accumulates on kinetochores, resulting in activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). CUL3-KLHL22 ubiquitylates Lys 492, located within the PBD, leading to PLK1 dissociation from kinetochore phosphoreceptors. Expression of a non-ubiquitylatable PLK1-K492R mutant phenocopies inactivation of CUL3-KLHL22. KLHL22 associates with the mitotic spindle and its interaction with PLK1 increases on chromosome bi-orientation. Our data suggest that CUL3-KLHL22-mediated ubiquitylation signals degradation-independent removal of PLK1 from kinetochores and SAC satisfaction, which are required for faithful mitosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncb2695DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7116173PMC
April 2013

Deciphering correct strategies for multiprotein complex assembly by co-expression: application to complexes as large as the histone octamer.

J Struct Biol 2011 Aug 12;175(2):178-88. Epub 2011 Feb 12.

Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), Département de Biologie Intégrative, Institut National de Santé et de Recherche Médicale (INSERM) U964/Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 1704/Université de Strasbourg, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch, France.

Macromolecular complexes are responsible for most of the essential mechanisms in cells, leading to a broad interest in their purification and characterization. Co-expression is now widely recognized as a major technique for assembling multiprotein complexes and many co-expression systems are currently available for performing co-expression experiments in different hosts. However, comparative knowledge on co-expression strategies is still crucially lacking. Using versatile co-expression systems for Escherichia coli, the pET-MCN and pET-MCP series, and ternary protein complexes as examples, we demonstrate how to successfully delineate correct co-expression strategies. Specifically, an appropriate, complex-dependent approach alleviates stoichiometry imbalance and yield problems, and even failure in producing complexes. Importantly, some of the parameters influencing co-expression strategies appear independent of the expression host, thus having implications for co-expression in eukaryotic hosts. By further using these strategies, we show that co-expression in E. coli enables reconstitution of protein complexes as large as the deubiquitination module of the SAGA transcription factor and the histone octamer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsb.2011.02.001DOI Listing
August 2011
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