Publications by authors named "Thibaud Jouan"

19 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

De novo SMARCA2 variants clustered outside the helicase domain cause a new recognizable syndrome with intellectual disability and blepharophimosis distinct from Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome.

Genet Med 2020 11 22;22(11):1838-1850. Epub 2020 Jul 22.

Department of Genetics, Robert Debré Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France.

Purpose: Nontruncating variants in SMARCA2, encoding a catalytic subunit of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, cause Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NCBRS), a condition with intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies. Other disorders due to SMARCA2 are unknown.

Methods: By next-generation sequencing, we identified candidate variants in SMARCA2 in 20 individuals from 18 families with a syndromic neurodevelopmental disorder not consistent with NCBRS. To stratify variant interpretation, we functionally analyzed SMARCA2 variants in yeasts and performed transcriptomic and genome methylation analyses on blood leukocytes.

Results: Of 20 individuals, 14 showed a recognizable phenotype with recurrent features including epicanthal folds, blepharophimosis, and downturned nasal tip along with variable degree of intellectual disability (or blepharophimosis intellectual disability syndrome [BIS]). In contrast to most NCBRS variants, all SMARCA2 variants associated with BIS are localized outside the helicase domains. Yeast phenotype assays differentiated NCBRS from non-NCBRS SMARCA2 variants. Transcriptomic and DNA methylation signatures differentiated NCBRS from BIS and those with nonspecific phenotype. In the remaining six individuals with nonspecific dysmorphic features, clinical and molecular data did not permit variant reclassification.

Conclusion: We identified a novel recognizable syndrome named BIS associated with clustered de novo SMARCA2 variants outside the helicase domains, phenotypically and molecularly distinct from NCBRS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-0898-yDOI Listing
November 2020

mutations in the X-linked gene cause intellectual disability with pigmentary mosaicism and storage disorder-like features.

J Med Genet 2020 12 14;57(12):808-819. Epub 2020 May 14.

Division of Genomics and Genetics, Boston Children s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Introduction: Pigmentary mosaicism (PM) manifests by pigmentation anomalies along Blaschko's lines and represents a clue toward the molecular diagnosis of syndromic intellectual disability (ID). Together with new insights on the role for lysosomal signalling in embryonic stem cell differentiation, mutations in the X-linked transcription factor 3 () have recently been reported in five patients. Functional analysis suggested these mutations to result in ectopic nuclear gain of functions.

Materials And Methods: Subsequent data sharing allowed the clustering of variants identified by exome sequencing on DNA extracted from leucocytes in patients referred for syndromic ID with or without PM.

Results: We describe the detailed clinical and molecular data of 17 individuals harbouring a variant, including the patients that initially allowed reporting as a new disease-causing gene. The 12 females and 5 males presented with pigmentation anomalies on Blaschko's lines, severe ID, epilepsy, storage disorder-like features, growth retardation and recognisable facial dysmorphism. The variant was at a mosaic state in at least two male patients. All variants were missense except one splice variant. Eleven of the 13 variants were localised in exon 4, 2 in exon 3, and 3 were recurrent variants.

Conclusion: This series further delineates the specific storage disorder-like phenotype with PM ascribed to mutation in exons 3 and 4. It confirms the identification of a novel X-linked human condition associated with mosaicism and dysregulation within the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, as well as a link between lysosomal signalling and human development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2019-106508DOI Listing
December 2020

Further delineation of the female phenotype with KDM5C disease causing variants: 19 new individuals and review of the literature.

Clin Genet 2020 07 29;98(1):43-55. Epub 2020 May 29.

INSERM UMR1231, Equipe Génétique des Anomalies du Développement, Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France.

X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a genetically heterogeneous condition involving more than 100 genes. To date, 35 pathogenic variants have been reported in the lysine specific demethylase 5C (KDM5C) gene. KDM5C variants are one of the major causes of moderate to severe XLID. Affected males present with short stature, distinctive facial features, behavioral disorders, epilepsy, and spasticity. For most of these variants, related female carriers have been reported, but phenotypic descriptions were poor. Here, we present clinical and molecular features of 19 females carrying 10 novel heterozygous variants affecting KDM5C function, including five probands with de novo variants. Four heterozygous females were asymptomatic. All affected individuals presented with learning disabilities or ID (mostly moderate), and four also had a language impairment mainly affecting expression. Behavioral disturbances were frequent, and endocrine disorders were more frequent in females. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of the role of KDM5C in ID in females highlighting the increasing implication of XLID genes in females, even in sporadic affected individuals. Disease expression of XLID in females should be taken into consideration for genetic counseling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cge.13755DOI Listing
July 2020

Excess of de novo variants in genes involved in chromatin remodelling in patients with marfanoid habitus and intellectual disability.

J Med Genet 2020 07 10;57(7):466-474. Epub 2020 Apr 10.

Centre de Compétence Anomalies du Développement et Syndromes Malformatifs Sud-Est, CHI de Toulon - La Seyne-sur-Mer, France.

Purpose: Marfanoid habitus (MH) combined with intellectual disability (ID) (MHID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous presentation. The combination of array CGH and targeted sequencing of genes responsible for Marfan or Lujan-Fryns syndrome explain no more than 20% of subjects.

Methods: To further decipher the genetic basis of MHID, we performed exome sequencing on a combination of trio-based (33 subjects) or single probands (31 subjects), of which 61 were sporadic.

Results: We identified eight genes with de novo variants (DNVs) in at least two unrelated individuals ( and ). Using simulation models, we showed that five genes ( and ) met conservative Bonferroni genomewide significance for an excess of the observed de novo point variants. Overall, at least one pathogenic or likely pathogenic variant was identified in 54.7% of subjects (35/64). These variants fell within 27 genes previously associated with Mendelian disorders, including and , which are known to be mutated in overgrowth syndromes.

Conclusion: We demonstrated that DNVs were enriched in chromatin remodelling (p=2×10) and genes regulated by the fragile X mental retardation protein (p=3×10), highlighting overlapping genetic mechanisms between MHID and related neurodevelopmental disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2019-106425DOI Listing
July 2020

De novo TBR1 variants cause a neurocognitive phenotype with ID and autistic traits: report of 25 new individuals and review of the literature.

Eur J Hum Genet 2020 06 31;28(6):770-782. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Department of Pediatrics, The Barbara Bush Children's Hospital, Maine Medical Center, Portland, OR, USA.

TBR1, a T-box transcription factor expressed in the cerebral cortex, regulates the expression of several candidate genes for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Although TBR1 has been reported as a high-confidence risk gene for ASD and intellectual disability (ID) in functional and clinical reports since 2011, TBR1 has only recently been recorded as a human disease gene in the OMIM database. Currently, the neurodevelopmental disorders and structural brain anomalies associated with TBR1 variants are not well characterized. Through international data sharing, we collected data from 25 unreported individuals and compared them with data from the literature. We evaluated structural brain anomalies in seven individuals by analysis of MRI images, and compared these with anomalies observed in TBR1 mutant mice. The phenotype included ID in all individuals, associated to autistic traits in 76% of them. No recognizable facial phenotype could be identified. MRI analysis revealed a reduction of the anterior commissure and suggested new features including dysplastic hippocampus and subtle neocortical dysgenesis. This report supports the role of TBR1 in ID associated with autistic traits and suggests new structural brain malformations in humans. We hope this work will help geneticists to interpret TBR1 variants and diagnose ASD probands.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-020-0571-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7253452PMC
June 2020

A novel homozygous KCNQ3 loss-of-function variant causes non-syndromic intellectual disability and neonatal-onset pharmacodependent epilepsy.

Epilepsia Open 2019 Sep 11;4(3):464-475. Epub 2019 Aug 11.

Division of Pharmacology, Department of Neuroscience University of Naples "Federico II" Naples Italy.

Objective: Heterozygous variants in or, more rarely, genes are responsible for early-onset developmental/epileptic disorders characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentation and course, genetic transmission, and prognosis. While familial forms mostly include benign epilepsies with seizures starting in the neonatal or early-infantile period, de novo variants in or have been described in sporadic cases of early-onset encephalopathy (EOEE) with pharmacoresistant seizures, various age-related pathological EEG patterns, and moderate/severe developmental impairment. All pathogenic variants in or occur in heterozygosity. The aim of this work was to report the clinical, molecular, and functional properties of a new variant found in homozygous configuration in a 9-year-old girl with pharmacodependent neonatal-onset epilepsy and non-syndromic intellectual disability.

Methods: Exome sequencing was used for genetic investigation. KCNQ3 transcript and subunit expression in fibroblasts was analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting or immunofluorescence, respectively. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used for functional characterization of mutant subunits.

Results: A novel single-base duplication in exon 12 of (NM_004519.3:c.1599dup) was found in homozygous configuration in the proband born to consanguineous healthy parents; this frameshift variant introduced a premature termination codon (PTC), thus deleting a large part of the C-terminal region. Mutant KCNQ3 transcript and protein abundance was markedly reduced in primary fibroblasts from the proband, consistent with nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The variant fully abolished the ability of KCNQ3 subunits to assemble into functional homomeric or heteromeric channels with KCNQ2 subunits.

Significance: The present results indicate that a homozygous loss-of-function variant is responsible for a severe phenotype characterized by neonatal-onset pharmacodependent seizures, with developmental delay and intellectual disability. They also reveal difference in genetic and pathogenetic mechanisms between - and -related epilepsies, a crucial observation for patients affected with EOEE and/or developmental disabilities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/epi4.12353DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6698674PMC
September 2019

Increased diagnostic and new genes identification outcome using research reanalysis of singleton exome sequencing.

Eur J Hum Genet 2019 10 23;27(10):1519-1531. Epub 2019 Jun 23.

Inserm UMR 1231 GAD, Genetics of Developmental disorders, Université de Bourgogne-Franche Comté, FHU TRANSLAD, Dijon, France.

In clinical exome sequencing (cES), the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics recommends limiting variant interpretation to established human-disease genes. The diagnostic yield of cES in intellectual disability and/or multiple congenital anomalies (ID/MCA) is currently about 30%. Though the results may seem acceptable for rare diseases, they mean that 70% of affected individuals remain genetically undiagnosed. Further analysis extended to all mutated genes in a research environment is a valuable strategy for improving diagnostic yields. This study presents the results of systematic research reanalysis of negative cES in a cohort of 313 individuals with ID/MCA. We identified 17 new genes not related to human disease, implicated 22 non-OMIM disease-causing genes recently or previously rarely related to disease, and described 1 new phenotype associated with a known gene. Twenty-six candidate genes were identified and are waiting for future recurrence. Overall, we diagnose 15% of the individuals with initial negative cES, increasing the diagnostic yield from 30% to more than 40% (or 46% if strong candidate genes are considered). This study demonstrates the power of such extended research reanalysis to increase scientific knowledge of rare diseases. These novel findings can then be applied in the field of diagnostics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-019-0442-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6777617PMC
October 2019

Variant recurrence in neurodevelopmental disorders: the use of publicly available genomic data identifies clinically relevant pathogenic missense variants.

Genet Med 2019 11 30;21(11):2504-2511. Epub 2019 Apr 30.

Inserm UMR 1231 GAD, Genetics of Developmental disorders, Université de Bourgogne-Franche Comté, FHU TRANSLAD, Dijon, France.

Purpose: Next-generation sequencing has revealed the major impact of de novo variants (DNVs) in developmental disorders (DD) such as intellectual disability, autism, and epilepsy. However, a substantial fraction of these predicted pathogenic DNVs remains challenging to distinguish from background DNVs, notably the missense variants acting via nonhaploinsufficient mechanisms on specific amino acid residues. We hypothesized that the detection of the same missense variation in at least two unrelated individuals presenting with a similar phenotype could be a powerful approach to reveal novel pathogenic variants.

Methods: We looked for variations independently present in both our database of >1200 solo exomes and in denovo-db, a large, publicly available collection of de novo variants identified in patients with DD.

Results: This approach identified 30 variants with strong evidence of pathogenicity, including variants already classified as pathogenic or probably pathogenic by our team, and also several new variants of interest in known OMIM genes or in novel genes. We identified FEM1B and GNAI2 as good candidate genes for syndromic intellectual disability and confirmed the implication of ACTL6B in a neurodevelopmental disorder.

Conclusion: Annotation of local variants with denovo-db can highlight missense variants with high potential for pathogenicity, both facilitating the time-consuming reanalysis process and allowing novel DD gene discoveries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-019-0518-xDOI Listing
November 2019

Secondary actionable findings identified by exome sequencing: expected impact on the organisation of care from the study of 700 consecutive tests.

Eur J Hum Genet 2019 08 24;27(8):1197-1214. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Centre National de Recherche en Génomique Humaine, Evry, France.

With exome/genome sequencing (ES/GS) integrated into the practice of medicine, there is some potential for reporting incidental/secondary findings (IFs/SFs). The issue of IFs/SFs has been studied extensively over the last 4 years. In order to evaluate their implications in care organisation, we retrospectively evaluated, in a cohort of 700 consecutive probands, the frequency and burden of introducing the search for variants in a maximum list of 244 medically actionable genes (genes that predispose carriers to a preventable or treatable disease in childhood/adulthood and genes for genetic counselling issues). We also focused on the 59 PharmGKB class IA/IB pharmacogenetic variants. We also compared the results in different gene lists. We identified variants (likely) affecting protein function in genes for care in 26 cases (3.7%) and heterozygous variants in genes for genetic counselling in 29 cases (3.8%). Mean time for the 700 patients was about 6.3 min/patient for medically actionable genes and 1.3 min/patient for genes for genetic counselling, and a mean time of 37 min/patients for the reinterpreted variants. These results would lead to all 700 pre-test counselling sessions being longer, to 55 post-test genetic consultations and to 27 secondary specialised medical evaluations. ES also detected 42/59 pharmacogenetic variants or combinations of variants in the majority of cases. An extremely low metabolizer status in genes relevant for neurodevelopmental disorders (CYP2C9 and CYP2C19) was found in 57/700 cases. This study provides information regarding the need to anticipate the implementation of genomic medicine, notably the work overload at various steps of the process.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-019-0384-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6777608PMC
August 2019

Lysosomal Signaling Licenses Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation via Inactivation of Tfe3.

Cell Stem Cell 2019 02 27;24(2):257-270.e8. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, 4058 Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Self-renewal and differentiation of pluripotent murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is regulated by extrinsic signaling pathways. It is less clear whether cellular metabolism instructs developmental progression. In an unbiased genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 screen, we identified components of a conserved amino-acid-sensing pathway as critical drivers of ESC differentiation. Functional analysis revealed that lysosome activity, the Ragulator protein complex, and the tumor-suppressor protein Folliculin enable the Rag GTPases C and D to bind and seclude the bHLH transcription factor Tfe3 in the cytoplasm. In contrast, ectopic nuclear Tfe3 represses specific developmental and metabolic transcriptional programs that are associated with peri-implantation development. We show differentiation-specific and non-canonical regulation of Rag GTPase in ESCs and, importantly, identify point mutations in a Tfe3 domain required for cytoplasmic inactivation as potentially causal for a human developmental disorder. Our work reveals an instructive and biomedically relevant role of metabolic signaling in licensing embryonic cell fate transitions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2018.11.021DOI Listing
February 2019

Recessive loss of function PIGN alleles, including an intragenic deletion with founder effect in La Réunion Island, in patients with Fryns syndrome.

Eur J Hum Genet 2018 03 12;26(3):340-349. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

INSERM UMR 1231 GAD team, Genetics of Developmental Anomalies, Université de Bourgogne-Franche Comté, Dijon, France.

Fryns syndrome (FS) is a multiple malformations syndrome with major features of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphic features, distal digit hypoplasia, and a range of other lower frequency malformations. FS is typically lethal in the fetal or neonatal period. Inheritance is presumed autosomal recessive. Although no major genetic cause has been identified for FS, biallelic truncating variants in PIGN, encoding a component of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor biosynthesis pathway, have been identified in a limited number of cases with a phenotype compatible with FS. Biallelic variants in PIGN, typically missense or compound missense with truncating, also cause multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 1 (MCAHS1). Here we report six further patients with FS with or without congenital diaphragmatic hernia and recessive loss of function PIGN alleles, including an intragenic deletion with a likely founder effect in La Réunion and other Indian Ocean islands. Our results support the hypothesis that a spectrum of phenotypic severity is associated with recessive PIGN variants, ranging from FS at the extreme end, caused by complete loss of function, to MCAHS1, in which some residual PIGN function may remain. Our data add FS resulting from PIGN variants to the catalog of inherited GPI deficiencies caused by the disruption of the GPI-anchor biosynthesis pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-017-0087-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839001PMC
March 2018

Clinical whole-exome sequencing for the diagnosis of rare disorders with congenital anomalies and/or intellectual disability: substantial interest of prospective annual reanalysis.

Genet Med 2018 06 2;20(6):645-654. Epub 2017 Nov 2.

Centre de Génétique et Centre de Référence "Anomalies du Développement et Syndromes Malformatifs," Hôpital d'Enfants, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Dijon, Dijon, France.

PurposeCongenital anomalies and intellectual disability (CA/ID) are a major diagnostic challenge in medical genetics-50% of patients still have no molecular diagnosis after a long and stressful diagnostic "odyssey." Solo clinical whole-exome sequencing (WES) was applied in our genetics center to improve diagnosis in patients with CA/ID.MethodsThis retrospective study examined 416 consecutive tests performed over 3 years to demonstrate the effectiveness of periodically reanalyzing WES data. The raw data from each nonpositive test was reanalyzed at 12 months with the most recent pipeline and in the light of new data in the literature. The results of the reanalysis for patients enrolled in the third year are not yet available.ResultsOf the 416 patients included, data for 156 without a diagnosis were reanalyzed. We obtained 24 (15.4%) additional diagnoses: 12 through the usual diagnostic process (7 new publications, 4 initially misclassified, and 1 copy-number variant), and 12 through translational research by international data sharing. The final yield of positive results was 27.9% through a strict diagnostic approach, and 2.9% through an additional research strategy.ConclusionThis article highlights the effectiveness of periodically combining diagnostic reinterpretation of clinical WES data with translational research involving data sharing for candidate genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gim.2017.162DOI Listing
June 2018

Reducing diagnostic turnaround times of exome sequencing for families requiring timely diagnoses.

Eur J Med Genet 2017 Nov 12;60(11):595-604. Epub 2017 Aug 12.

Equipe Génétique des Anomalies du Développement, INSERM UMR1231, Université de Bourgogne-Franche Comté, Dijon, France; Centre de Génétique et Centre de Référence Anomalies du Développement et Syndromes Malformatifs, FHU TRANSLAD, Hôpital d'Enfants, CHU Dijon et Université de Bourgogne, Dijon, France. Electronic address:

Background And Objective: Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has now entered medical practice with powerful applications in the diagnosis of rare Mendelian disorders. Although the usefulness and cost-effectiveness of WES have been widely demonstrated, it is essential to reduce the diagnostic turnaround time to make WES a first-line procedure. Since 2011, the automation of laboratory procedures and advances in sequencing chemistry have made it possible to carry out diagnostic whole genome sequencing from the blood sample to molecular diagnosis of suspected genetic disorders within 50 h. Taking advantage of these advances, the main objective of the study was to improve turnaround times for sequencing results.

Methods: WES was proposed to 29 patients with severe undiagnosed disorders with developmental abnormalities and faced with medical situations requiring rapid diagnosis. Each family gave consent. The extracted DNA was sequenced on a NextSeq500 (Illumina) instrument. Data were analyzed following standard procedures. Variants were interpreted using in-house software. Each rare variant affecting protein sequences with clinical relevance was tested for familial segregation.

Results: The diagnostic rate was 45% (13/29), with a mean turnaround time of 40 days from reception of the specimen to delivery of results to the referring physician. Besides permitting genetic counseling, the rapid diagnosis for positive families led to two pre-natal diagnoses and two inclusions in clinical trials.

Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of rapid diagnostic WES in our primary genetics center. It reduced the diagnostic odyssey and helped provide support to families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2017.08.011DOI Listing
November 2017

Mosaicism for a KITLG Mutation in Linear and Whorled Nevoid Hypermelanosis.

J Invest Dermatol 2017 07 28;137(7):1575-1578. Epub 2017 Feb 28.

Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté, EA 4271 Génétique des Anomalies du Développement, Dijon, France; Service de Pathologie, Plateau Technique de Biologie, CHU Dijon Bourgogne, France; Service de Dermatologie, CHU Dijon Bourgogne, Dijon, France; Centre de référence Anomalies du Développement et Syndromes Malformatifs, CHU Dijon Bourgogne, France. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2017.01.035DOI Listing
July 2017

Molecular diagnosis of PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS) in 162 patients and recommendations for genetic testing.

Genet Med 2017 09 2;19(9):989-997. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Service de Génétique, CHU de Rouen et Inserm U1079, Université de Rouen, Centre Normand de Génomique Médicale et Médecine Personnalisée, Rouen, France.

Purpose: Postzygotic activating mutations of PIK3CA cause a wide range of mosaic disorders collectively referred to as PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS). We describe the diagnostic yield and characteristics of PIK3CA sequencing in PROS.

Methods: We performed ultradeep next-generation sequencing (NGS) of PIK3CA in various tissues from 162 patients referred to our clinical laboratory and assessed diagnostic yield by phenotype and tissue tested.

Results: We identified disease-causing mutations in 66.7% (108/162) of patients, with mutant allele levels as low as 1%. The diagnostic rate was higher (74%) in syndromic than in isolated cases (35.5%; P = 9.03 × 10). We identified 40 different mutations and found strong oncogenic mutations more frequently in patients without brain overgrowth (50.6%) than in those with brain overgrowth (15.2%; P = 0.00055). Mutant allele levels were higher in skin and overgrown tissues than in blood and buccal samples (P = 3.9 × 10), regardless of the phenotype.

Conclusion: Our data demonstrate the value of ultradeep NGS for molecular diagnosis of PROS, highlight its substantial allelic heterogeneity, and confirm that optimal diagnosis requires fresh skin or surgical samples from affected regions. Our findings may be of value in guiding future recommendations for genetic testing in PROS and other mosaic conditions.Genet Med advance online publication 02 February 2017.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/gim.2016.220DOI Listing
September 2017

Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in AP3B2, Adaptor-Related Protein Complex 3 Beta 2 Subunit, Cause an Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy with Optic Atrophy.

Am J Hum Genet 2016 Dec 23;99(6):1368-1376. Epub 2016 Nov 23.

Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Jordan University, Amman 11942, Jordan.

Early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (EOEE) represents a heterogeneous group of severe disorders characterized by seizures, interictal epileptiform activity with a disorganized electroencephalography background, developmental regression or retardation, and onset before 1 year of age. Among a cohort of 57 individuals with epileptic encephalopathy, we ascertained two unrelated affected individuals with EOEE associated with developmental impairment and autosomal-recessive variants in AP3B2 by means of whole-exome sequencing. The targeted sequencing of AP3B2 in 86 unrelated individuals with EOEE led to the identification of an additional family. We gathered five additional families with eight affected individuals through the Matchmaker Exchange initiative by matching autosomal-recessive mutations in AP3B2. Reverse phenotyping of 12 affected individuals from eight families revealed a homogeneous EOEE phenotype characterized by severe developmental delay, poor visual contact with optic atrophy, and postnatal microcephaly. No spasticity, albinism, or hematological symptoms were reported. AP3B2 encodes the neuron-specific subunit of the AP-3 complex. Autosomal-recessive variations of AP3B1, the ubiquitous isoform, cause Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2. The only isoform for the δ subunit of the AP-3 complex is encoded by AP3D1. Autosomal-recessive mutations in AP3D1 cause a severe disorder cumulating the symptoms of the AP3B1 and AP3B2 defects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.10.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5142104PMC
December 2016

Application of whole-exome sequencing to unravel the molecular basis of undiagnosed syndromic congenital neutropenia with intellectual disability.

Am J Med Genet A 2017 Jan 12;173(1):62-71. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Centre de Génétique et Centre de Référence Maladies Rares « Anomalies du Développement et Syndromes Malformatifs de l'Interrégion Est », Hôpital d'Enfants, CHU, Dijon, France.

Neutropenia can be qualified as congenital when of neonatal onset or when associated with extra-hematopoietic manifestations. Overall, 30% of patients with congenital neutropenia (CN) remain without a molecular diagnosis after a multidisciplinary consultation and tedious diagnostic strategy. In the rare situations when neutropenia is identified and associated with intellectual disability (ID), there are few diagnostic hypotheses to test. This retrospective multicenter study reports on a clinically heterogeneous cohort of 10 unrelated patients with CN associated with ID and no molecular diagnosis prior to whole-exome sequencing (WES). WES provided a diagnostic yield of 40% (4/10). The results suggested that in many cases neutropenia and syndromic manifestations could not be assigned to the same molecular alteration. Three sub-groups of patients were highlighted: (i) severe, symptomatic chronic neutropenia, detected early in life, and related to a known mutation in the CN spectrum (ELANE); (ii) mild to moderate benign intermittent neutropenia, detected later, and associated with mutations in genes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (CHD2, HUWE1); and (iii) moderate to severe intermittent neutropenia as a probably undiagnosed feature of a newly reported syndrome (KAT6A). Unlike KAT6A, which seems to be associated with a syndromic form of CN, the other reported mutations may not explain the entire clinical picture. Although targeted gene sequencing can be discussed for the primary diagnosis of severe CN, we suggest that performing WES for the diagnosis of disorders associating CN with ID will not only provide the etiological diagnosis but will also pave the way towards personalized care and follow-up. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.37969DOI Listing
January 2017