Publications by authors named "Thi Tuyet Mai Nguyen"

23 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Expanding the phenotype of PIGS-associated early onset epileptic developmental encephalopathy.

Epilepsia 2021 02 7;62(2):e35-e41. Epub 2021 Jan 7.

Department of Neuromuscular Disorders, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK.

The phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis class S protein (PIGS) gene has recently been implicated in a novel congenital disorder of glycosylation resulting in autosomal recessive inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP) deficiency. Previous studies described seven patients with biallelic variants in the PIGS gene, of whom two presented with fetal akinesia and five with global developmental delay and epileptic developmental encephalopathy. We present the molecular and clinical characteristics of six additional individuals from five families with unreported variants in PIGS. All individuals presented with hypotonia, severe global developmental delay, microcephaly, intractable early infantile epilepsy, and structural brain abnormalities. Additional findings include vision impairment, hearing loss, renal malformation, and hypotonic facial appearances with minor dysmorphic features but without a distinctive facial gestalt. Four individuals died due to neurologic complications. GPI anchoring studies performed on one individual revealed a significant decrease in GPI-APs. We confirm that biallelic variants in PIGS cause vitamin pyridoxine-responsive epilepsy due to inherited GPI deficiency and expand the genotype and phenotype of PIGS-related disorder. Further delineation of the molecular spectrum of PIGS-related disorders would improve management, help develop treatments, and encourage the expansion of diagnostic genetic testing to include this gene as a potential cause of neurodevelopmental disorders and epilepsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/epi.16801DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7898547PMC
February 2021

PIGF deficiency causes a phenotype overlapping with DOORS syndrome.

Hum Genet 2021 Jan 2. Epub 2021 Jan 2.

Department of Pediatrics, CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, University of Montreal, 3175, Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Montreal, QC, H3T 1C5, Canada.

DOORS syndrome is characterized by deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, intellectual disability, and seizures. In this study, we report two unrelated individuals with DOORS syndrome without deafness. Exome sequencing revealed a homozygous missense variant in PIGF (NM_173074.3:c.515C>G, p.Pro172Arg) in both. We demonstrate impaired glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis through flow cytometry analysis. We thus describe the causal role of a novel disease gene, PIGF, in DOORS syndrome and highlight the overlap between this condition and GPI deficiency disorders. For each gene implicated in DOORS syndrome and/or inherited GPI deficiencies, there is considerable clinical variability so a high index of suspicion is warranted even though not all features are noted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-020-02251-2DOI Listing
January 2021

PIGH deficiency can be associated with severe neurodevelopmental and skeletal manifestations.

Clin Genet 2021 Feb 27;99(2):313-317. Epub 2020 Nov 27.

Department of Pediatrics, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Phosphatidylinositol Glycan Anchor Biosynthesis class H (PIGH) is an essential player in the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) synthesis, an anchor for numerous cell membrane-bound proteins. PIGH deficiency is a newly described and rare disorder associated with developmental delay, seizures and behavioral difficulties. Herein, we report three new unrelated families with two different bi-allelic PIGH variants, including one new variant p.(Arg163Trp) which seems associated with a more severe phenotype. The common clinical features in all affected individuals are developmental delay/intellectual disability and hypotonia. Variable clinical features include seizures, autism spectrum disorder, apraxia, severe language delay, dysarthria, feeding difficulties, facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly, strabismus, and musculoskeletal anomalies. The two siblings homozygous for the p.(Arg163Trp) variant have severe symptoms including profound psychomotor retardation, intractable seizures, multiple bone fractures, scoliosis, loss of independent ambulation, and delayed myelination on brain MRI. Serum iron levels were significantly elevated in one individual. All tested individuals with PIGH deficiency had normal alkaline phosphatase and CD16, a GPI-anchored protein (GPI-AP), was found to be decreased by 60% on granulocytes from one individual. This study expands the PIGH deficiency phenotype range toward the severe end of the spectrum with the identification of a novel pathogenic variant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cge.13877DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7839508PMC
February 2021

MYSM1 maintains ribosomal protein gene expression in hematopoietic stem cells to prevent hematopoietic dysfunction.

JCI Insight 2020 07 9;5(13). Epub 2020 Jul 9.

Department of Physiology.

Ribosomopathies are congenital disorders caused by mutations in the genes encoding ribosomal and other functionally related proteins. They are characterized by anemia, other hematopoietic and developmental abnormalities, and p53 activation. Ribosome assembly requires coordinated expression of many ribosomal protein (RP) genes; however, the regulation of RP gene expression, especially in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), remains poorly understood. MYSM1 is a transcriptional regulator essential for HSC function and hematopoiesis. We established that HSC dysfunction in Mysm1 deficiency is driven by p53; however, the mechanisms of p53 activation remained unclear. Here, we describe the transcriptome of Mysm1-deficient mouse HSCs and identify MYSM1 genome-wide DNA binding sites. We establish a direct role for MYSM1 in RP gene expression and show a reduction in protein synthesis in Mysm1-/- HSCs. Loss of p53 in mice fully rescues Mysm1-/- anemia phenotype but not RP gene expression, indicating that RP gene dysregulation is a direct outcome of Mysm1 deficiency and an upstream mediator of Mysm1-/- phenotypes through p53 activation. We characterize a patient with a homozygous nonsense MYSM1 gene variant, and we demonstrate reduced protein synthesis and increased p53 levels in patient hematopoietic cells. Our work provides insights into the specialized mechanisms regulating RP gene expression in HSCs and establishes a common etiology of MYSM1 deficiency and ribosomopathy syndromes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1172/jci.insight.125690DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7406308PMC
July 2020

Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy due to biallelic pathogenic variants in PIGQ: Report of seven new subjects and review of the literature.

J Inherit Metab Dis 2020 11 3;43(6):1321-1332. Epub 2020 Aug 3.

Research Center, CHU Sainte Justine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

We investigated seven children from six families to expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with an early infantile epileptic encephalopathy caused by biallelic pathogenic variants in the phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis class Q (PIGQ) gene. The affected children were all identified by clinical or research exome sequencing. Clinical data, including EEGs and MRIs, was comprehensively reviewed and flow cytometry and transfection experiments were performed to investigate PIGQ function. Pathogenic biallelic PIGQ variants were associated with increased mortality. Epileptic seizures, axial hypotonia, developmental delay and multiple congenital anomalies were consistently observed. Seizure onset occurred between 2.5 months and 7 months of age and varied from treatable seizures to recurrent episodes of status epilepticus. Gastrointestinal issues were common and severe, two affected individuals had midgut volvulus requiring surgical correction. Cardiac anomalies including arrythmias were observed. Flow cytometry using granulocytes and fibroblasts from affected individuals showed reduced expression of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. Transfection of wildtype PIGQ cDNA into patient fibroblasts rescued this phenotype. We expand the phenotypic spectrum of PIGQ-related disease and provide the first functional evidence in human cells of defective GPI-anchoring due to pathogenic variants in PIGQ.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jimd.12278DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7689772PMC
November 2020

Bi-allelic Variants in the GPI Transamidase Subunit PIGK Cause a Neurodevelopmental Syndrome with Hypotonia, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Epilepsy.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 04 26;106(4):484-495. Epub 2020 Mar 26.

CHU-Sainte Justine Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada, H3T1C5; Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada, H3T1C5. Electronic address:

Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are critical for embryogenesis, neurogenesis, and cell signaling. Variants in several genes participating in GPI biosynthesis and processing lead to decreased cell surface presence of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) and cause inherited GPI deficiency disorders (IGDs). In this report, we describe 12 individuals from nine unrelated families with 10 different bi-allelic PIGK variants. PIGK encodes a component of the GPI transamidase complex, which attaches the GPI anchor to proteins. Clinical features found in most individuals include global developmental delay and/or intellectual disability, hypotonia, cerebellar ataxia, cerebellar atrophy, and facial dysmorphisms. The majority of the individuals have epilepsy. Two individuals have slightly decreased levels of serum alkaline phosphatase, while eight do not. Flow cytometric analysis of blood and fibroblasts from affected individuals showed decreased cell surface presence of GPI-APs. The overexpression of wild-type (WT) PIGK in fibroblasts rescued the levels of cell surface GPI-APs. In a knockout cell line, transfection with WT PIGK also rescued the GPI-AP levels, but transfection with the two tested mutant variants did not. Our study not only expands the clinical and known genetic spectrum of IGDs, but it also expands the genetic differential diagnosis for cerebellar atrophy. Given the fact that cerebellar atrophy is seen in other IGDs, flow cytometry for GPI-APs should be considered in the work-ups of individuals presenting this feature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.03.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7118585PMC
April 2020

A post glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) attachment to proteins, type 2 (PGAP2) variant identified in Mabry syndrome index cases: Molecular genetics of the prototypical inherited GPI disorder.

Eur J Med Genet 2020 Apr 2;63(4):103822. Epub 2019 Dec 2.

Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, United States.

We report that recessive inheritance of a post-GPI attachment to proteins 2 (PGAP2) gene variant results in the hyperphosphatasia with neurologic deficit (HPMRS) phenotype described by Mabry et al., in 1970. HPMRS, or Mabry syndrome, is now known to be one of 21 inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) deficiencies (IGDs), or GPI biosynthesis defects (GPIBDs). Bi-allelic mutations in at least six genes result in HPMRS phenotypes. Disruption of four phosphatidylinositol glycan (PIG) biosynthesis genes, PIGV, PIGO, PIGW and PIGY, expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum, result in HPMRS 1, 2, 5 and 6; disruption of the PGAP2 and PGAP3 genes, necessary for stabilizing the association of GPI anchored proteins (AP) with the Golgi membrane, result in HPMRS 3 and 4. We used exome sequencing to identify a novel homozygous missense PGAP2 variant NM_014489.3:c.881C > T, p.Thr294Met in two index patients and targeted sequencing to identify this variant in an unrelated patient. Rescue assays were conducted in two PGAP2 deficient cell lines, PGAP2 KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and PGAP2 deficient CHO cells, in order to examine the pathogenicity of the PGAP2 variant. First, we used the CHO rescue assay to establish that the wild type PGAP2 isoform 1, translated from transcript 1, is less active than the wild type PGAP2 isoform 8, translated from transcript 12 (alternatively spliced to omit exon 3). As a result, in our variant rescue assays, we used the more active NM_001256240.2:c.698C > T, p.Thr233Met isoform 8 instead of NM_014489.3:c.881C > T, p.Thr294Met isoform 1. Flow cytometric analysis showed that restoration of cell surface CD59 and CD55 with variant PGAP2 isoform 8, driven by the weak (pTA FLAG) promoter, was less efficient than wild type isoform 8. Therefore, we conclude that recessive inheritance of c.881C > T PGAP2, expressed as the hypomorphic PGAP2 c.698C > T, p.Thr233Met isoform 8, results in prototypical Mabry phenotype, HPMRS3 (GPIBD 8 [MIM: 614207]). This study highlights the need for long-term follow up of individuals with rare diseases in order to ensure that they benefit from innovations in diagnosis and treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2019.103822DOI Listing
April 2020

Mutations in ANAPC1, Encoding a Scaffold Subunit of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex, Cause Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome Type 1.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 09 11;105(3):625-630. Epub 2019 Jul 11.

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada. Electronic address:

Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by poikiloderma, sparse hair, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Type 2 RTS, which is defined by the presence of bi-allelic mutations in RECQL4, is characterized by increased cancer susceptibility and skeletal anomalies, whereas the genetic basis of RTS type 1, which is associated with juvenile cataracts, is unknown. We studied ten individuals, from seven families, who had RTS type 1 and identified a deep intronic splicing mutation of the ANAPC1 gene, a component of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), in all affected individuals, either in the homozygous state or in trans with another mutation. Fibroblast studies showed that the intronic mutation causes the activation of a 95 bp pseudoexon, leading to mRNAs with premature termination codons and nonsense-mediated decay, decreased ANAPC1 protein levels, and prolongation of interphase. Interestingly, mice that were heterozygous for a knockout mutation have an increased incidence of cataracts. Our results demonstrate that deficiency in the APC/C is a cause of RTS type 1 and suggest a possible link between the APC/C and RECQL4 helicase because both proteins are involved in DNA repair and replication.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.06.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6731352PMC
September 2019

Mutations in PIGB Cause an Inherited GPI Biosynthesis Defect with an Axonal Neuropathy and Metabolic Abnormality in Severe Cases.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 08 27;105(2):384-394. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine Research Center, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine and University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada. Electronic address:

Proteins anchored to the cell surface via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) play various key roles in the human body, particularly in development and neurogenesis. As such, many developmental disorders are caused by mutations in genes involved in the GPI biosynthesis and remodeling pathway. We describe ten unrelated families with bi-allelic mutations in PIGB, a gene that encodes phosphatidylinositol glycan class B, which transfers the third mannose to the GPI. Ten different PIGB variants were found in these individuals. Flow cytometric analysis of blood cells and fibroblasts from the affected individuals showed decreased cell surface presence of GPI-anchored proteins. Most of the affected individuals have global developmental and/or intellectual delay, all had seizures, two had polymicrogyria, and four had a peripheral neuropathy. Eight children passed away before four years old. Two of them had a clinical diagnosis of DOORS syndrome (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation, and seizures), a condition that includes sensorineural deafness, shortened terminal phalanges with small finger and toenails, intellectual disability, and seizures; this condition overlaps with the severe phenotypes associated with inherited GPI deficiency. Most individuals tested showed elevated alkaline phosphatase, which is a characteristic of the inherited GPI deficiency but not DOORS syndrome. It is notable that two severely affected individuals showed 2-oxoglutaric aciduria, which can be seen in DOORS syndrome, suggesting that severe cases of inherited GPI deficiency and DOORS syndrome might share some molecular pathway disruptions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.05.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6698938PMC
August 2019

Inherited glycophosphatidylinositol deficiency variant database and analysis of pathogenic variants.

Mol Genet Genomic Med 2019 07 24;7(7):e00743. Epub 2019 May 24.

CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Background: Glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) mediate several physiological processes such as embryogenesis and neurogenesis. Germline variants in genes involved in their synthesis can disrupt normal development and result in a variety of clinical phenotypes. With the advent of new sequencing technologies, more cases are identified, leading to a rapidly growing number of reported genetic variants. With this number expected to rise with increased accessibility to molecular tests, an accurate and up-to-date database is needed to keep track of the information and help interpret results.

Methods: We therefore developed an online resource (www.gpibiosynthesis.org) which compiles all published pathogenic variants in GPI biosynthesis genes which are deposited in the LOVD database. It contains 276 individuals and 192 unique public variants; 92% of which are predicted as damaging by bioinformatics tools.

Results: A significant proportion of recorded variants was substitution variants (81%) and resulted mainly in missense and frameshift alterations. Interestingly, five patients (2%) had deleterious mutations in untranslated regions. CADD score analysis placed 97% of variants in the top 1% of deleterious variants in the human genome. In genome aggregation database, the gene with the highest frequency of reported pathogenic variants is PIGL, with a carrier rate of 1/937.

Conclusion: We thus present the GPI biosynthesis database and review the molecular genetics of published variants in GPI-anchor biosynthesis genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mgg3.743DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6625143PMC
July 2019

Biallelic variants in the transcription factor PAX7 are a new genetic cause of myopathy.

Genet Med 2019 11 16;21(11):2521-2531. Epub 2019 May 16.

CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Purpose: Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration rely on muscle stem cells, called satellite cells. Specific transcription factors, particularly PAX7, are key regulators of the function of these cells. Knockout of this factor in mice leads to poor postnatal survival; however, the consequences of a lack of PAX7 in humans have not been established.

Methods: Here, we study five individuals with myopathy of variable severity from four unrelated consanguineous couples. Exome sequencing identified pathogenic variants in the PAX7 gene. Clinical examination, laboratory tests, and muscle biopsies were performed to characterize the disease.

Results: The disease was characterized by hypotonia, ptosis, muscular atrophy, scoliosis, and mildly dysmorphic facial features. The disease spectrum ranged from mild to severe and appears to be progressive. Muscle biopsies showed the presence of atrophic fibers and fibroadipose tissue replacement, with the absence of myofiber necrosis. A lack of PAX7 expression was associated with satellite cell pool exhaustion; however, the presence of residual myoblasts together with regenerating myofibers suggest that a population of PAX7-independent myogenic cells partially contributes to muscle regeneration.

Conclusion: These findings show that biallelic variants in the master transcription factor PAX7 cause a new type of myopathy that specifically affects satellite cell survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-019-0532-zDOI Listing
November 2019

Expanding the Spectrum of BAF-Related Disorders: De Novo Variants in SMARCC2 Cause a Syndrome with Intellectual Disability and Developmental Delay.

Am J Hum Genet 2019 01 20;104(1):164-178. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Department of Pediatrics, CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center and University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada. Electronic address:

SMARCC2 (BAF170) is one of the invariable core subunits of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling BAF (BRG1-associated factor) complex and plays a crucial role in embryogenesis and corticogenesis. Pathogenic variants in genes encoding other components of the BAF complex have been associated with intellectual disability syndromes. Despite its significant biological role, variants in SMARCC2 have not been directly associated with human disease previously. Using whole-exome sequencing and a web-based gene-matching program, we identified 15 individuals with variable degrees of neurodevelopmental delay and growth retardation harboring one of 13 heterozygous variants in SMARCC2, most of them novel and proven de novo. The clinical presentation overlaps with intellectual disability syndromes associated with other BAF subunits, such as Coffin-Siris and Nicolaides-Baraitser syndromes and includes prominent speech impairment, hypotonia, feeding difficulties, behavioral abnormalities, and dysmorphic features such as hypertrichosis, thick eyebrows, thin upper lip vermilion, and upturned nose. Nine out of the fifteen individuals harbor variants in the highly conserved SMARCC2 DNA-interacting domains (SANT and SWIRM) and present with a more severe phenotype. Two of these individuals present cardiac abnormalities. Transcriptomic analysis of fibroblasts from affected individuals highlights a group of differentially expressed genes with possible roles in regulation of neuronal development and function, namely H19, SCRG1, RELN, and CACNB4. Our findings suggest a novel SMARCC2-related syndrome that overlaps with neurodevelopmental disorders associated with variants in BAF-complex subunits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.11.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323608PMC
January 2019

Mutations in PIGS, Encoding a GPI Transamidase, Cause a Neurological Syndrome Ranging from Fetal Akinesia to Epileptic Encephalopathy.

Am J Hum Genet 2018 10 27;103(4):602-611. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte Justine Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T1C5, Canada. Electronic address:

Inherited GPI deficiencies (IGDs) are a subset of congenital disorders of glycosylation that are increasingly recognized as a result of advances in whole-exome sequencing (WES) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). IGDs cause a series of overlapping phenotypes consisting of seizures, dysmorphic features, multiple congenital malformations, and severe intellectual disability. We present a study of six individuals from three unrelated families in which WES or WGS identified bi-allelic phosphatidylinositol glycan class S (PIGS) biosynthesis mutations. Phenotypes included severe global developmental delay, seizures (partly responding to pyridoxine), hypotonia, weakness, ataxia, and dysmorphic facial features. Two of them had compound-heterozygous variants c.108G>A (p.Trp36) and c.101T>C (p.Leu34Pro), and two siblings of another family were homozygous for a deletion and insertion leading to p.Thr439_Lys451delinsArgLeuLeu. The third family had two fetuses with multiple joint contractures consistent with fetal akinesia. They were compound heterozygous for c.923A>G (p.Glu308Gly) and c.468+1G>C, a splicing mutation. Flow-cytometry analyses demonstrated that the individuals with PIGS mutations show a GPI-AP deficiency profile. Expression of the p.Trp36 variant in PIGS-deficient HEK293 cells revealed only partial restoration of cell-surface GPI-APs. In terms of both biochemistry and phenotype, loss of function of PIGS shares features with PIGT deficiency and other IGDs. This study contributes to the understanding of the GPI-AP biosynthesis pathway by describing the consequences of PIGS disruption in humans and extending the family of IGDs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2018.08.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6174287PMC
October 2018

Clinical variability in inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiency disorders.

Clin Genet 2019 01 16;95(1):112-121. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal QC, Canada.

It is estimated that 0.5% of all mammalian proteins have a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) play key roles, particularly in embryogenesis, neurogenesis, immune response and signal transduction. Due to their involvement in many pathways and developmental events, defects in the genes involved in their synthesis and processing can result in a variety of genetic disorders for which affected individuals display a wide spectrum of features. We compiled the clinical characteristics of 202 individuals with mutations in the GPI biosynthesis and processing pathway through a review of the literature. This review has allowed us to compare the characteristics and the severity of the phenotypes associated with different genes as well as highlight features that are prominent for each. Certain combinations, such as seizures with aplastic/hypoplastic nails or abnormal alkaline phosphatase levels suggest an inherited GPI deficiency, and our review of all clinical findings may orient the management of inherited GPI deficiencies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cge.13425DOI Listing
January 2019

A PIGH mutation leading to GPI deficiency is associated with developmental delay and autism.

Hum Mutat 2018 06 26;39(6):827-829. Epub 2018 Apr 26.

CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada.

We identified an individual with a homozygous missense variant (p.Ser103Pro) in a conserved residue of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis gene PIGH. This gene encodes an essential component of the phosphatidylinositol N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase complex, in the first step of the biosynthesis of GPI, a glycolipid anchor added to more than one hundred human proteins, several being critical for embryogenesis and neurological functions. The affected individual had hypotonia, moderate developmental delay, and autism. Unlike other reported individuals with GPI deficiency, the proband did not have epilepsy; however, he did have two episodes of febrile seizures. He had normal alkaline phosphatase and no brachytelephalangy. Upon analysis of the surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins on granulocytes, he was demonstrated to have GPI deficiency. This suggests that PIGH mutations may cause a syndrome with developmental delay and autism, but without an epileptic encephalopathy, and should increase the awareness of the potentially deleterious nature of biallelic variants in this gene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23426DOI Listing
June 2018

Recessive loss of function PIGN alleles, including an intragenic deletion with founder effect in La Réunion Island, in patients with Fryns syndrome.

Eur J Hum Genet 2018 03 12;26(3):340-349. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

INSERM UMR 1231 GAD team, Genetics of Developmental Anomalies, Université de Bourgogne-Franche Comté, Dijon, France.

Fryns syndrome (FS) is a multiple malformations syndrome with major features of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, pulmonary hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphic features, distal digit hypoplasia, and a range of other lower frequency malformations. FS is typically lethal in the fetal or neonatal period. Inheritance is presumed autosomal recessive. Although no major genetic cause has been identified for FS, biallelic truncating variants in PIGN, encoding a component of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor biosynthesis pathway, have been identified in a limited number of cases with a phenotype compatible with FS. Biallelic variants in PIGN, typically missense or compound missense with truncating, also cause multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 1 (MCAHS1). Here we report six further patients with FS with or without congenital diaphragmatic hernia and recessive loss of function PIGN alleles, including an intragenic deletion with a likely founder effect in La Réunion and other Indian Ocean islands. Our results support the hypothesis that a spectrum of phenotypic severity is associated with recessive PIGN variants, ranging from FS at the extreme end, caused by complete loss of function, to MCAHS1, in which some residual PIGN function may remain. Our data add FS resulting from PIGN variants to the catalog of inherited GPI deficiencies caused by the disruption of the GPI-anchor biosynthesis pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-017-0087-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839001PMC
March 2018

Mutations in GPAA1, Encoding a GPI Transamidase Complex Protein, Cause Developmental Delay, Epilepsy, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Osteopenia.

Am J Hum Genet 2017 Nov;101(5):856-865

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte Justine Research Center, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T1C5, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1J4, Canada. Electronic address:

Approximately one in every 200 mammalian proteins is anchored to the cell membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. These proteins play important roles notably in neurological development and function. To date, more than 20 genes have been implicated in the biogenesis of GPI-anchored proteins. GPAA1 (glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor attachment 1) is an essential component of the transamidase complex along with PIGK, PIGS, PIGT, and PIGU (phosphatidylinositol-glycan biosynthesis classes K, S, T, and U, respectively). This complex orchestrates the attachment of the GPI anchor to the C terminus of precursor proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we report bi-allelic mutations in GPAA1 in ten individuals from five families. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified two frameshift mutations (c.981_993del [p.Gln327Hisfs102] and c.920delG [p.Gly307Alafs11]), one intronic splicing mutation (c.1164+5C>T), and six missense mutations (c.152C>T [p.Ser51Leu], c.160_161delinsAA [p.Ala54Asn], c.527G>C [p.Trp176Ser], c.869T>C [p.Leu290Pro], c.872T>C [p.Leu291Pro], and c.1165G>C [p.Ala389Pro]). Most individuals presented with global developmental delay, hypotonia, early-onset seizures, cerebellar atrophy, and osteopenia. The splicing mutation was found to decrease GPAA1 mRNA. Moreover, flow-cytometry analysis of five available individual samples showed that several GPI-anchored proteins had decreased cell-surface abundance in leukocytes (FLAER, CD16, and CD59) or fibroblasts (CD73 and CD109). Transduction of fibroblasts with a lentivirus encoding the wild-type protein partially rescued the deficiency of GPI-anchored proteins. These findings highlight the role of the transamidase complex in the development and function of the cerebellum and the skeletal system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2017.09.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5673666PMC
November 2017

Four New Lignans and IL-2 Inhibitors from Magnoliae Flos.

Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) 2017 ;65(9):840-847

College of Pharmacy, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University.

Four new lignans, a furofuran lignan medioresinol B (10) and three tetrahydrofuran lignans kobusinol C (16), 7'-methoxy magnostellin A (21), and mangnostellin D (23), along with 19 known lignans, were isolated from the flower buds of Magnolia biondii PAMP. The structures of the isolates were elucidated using spectroscopic analysis, mainly one- and two-dimensional NMR, high resolution-MS, and circular dichroism techniques as well as Mosher's esterification method. The anti-allergic effects of the isolated compounds were evaluated by analyzing the inhibition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) expression in Jurkat T-cells. Compounds 11-14 reduced IL-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/cpb.c17-00314DOI Listing
October 2017

Compound heterozygous mutations in the gene PIGP are associated with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

Hum Mol Genet 2017 05;26(9):1706-1715

Research Center, CHU Sainte-Justine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3T1C5, Canada.

There are over 150 known human proteins which are tethered to the cell surface via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors. These proteins play a variety of important roles in development, and particularly in neurogenesis. Not surprisingly, mutations in the GPI anchor biosynthesis and remodeling pathway cause a number of developmental disorders. This group of conditions has been termed inherited GPI deficiencies (IGDs), a subgroup of congenital disorders of glycosylation; they present with variable phenotypes, often including seizures, hypotonia and intellectual disability. Here, we report two siblings with compound heterozygous variants in the gene phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor biosynthesis, class P (PIGP) (NM_153681.2: c.74T > C;p.Met25Thr and c.456delA;p.Glu153AsnFs*34). PIGP encodes a subunit of the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis. Both children presented with early-onset refractory seizures, hypotonia, and profound global developmental delay, reminiscent of other IGD phenotypes. Functional studies with patient cells showed reduced PIGP mRNA levels, and an associated reduction of GPI-anchored cell surface proteins, which was rescued by exogenous expression of wild-type PIGP. This work associates mutations in the PIGP gene with a novel autosomal recessive IGD, and expands our knowledge of the role of PIG genes in human development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/hmg/ddx077DOI Listing
May 2017

Mutations in the Chromatin Regulator Gene BRPF1 Cause Syndromic Intellectual Disability and Deficient Histone Acetylation.

Am J Hum Genet 2017 Jan 8;100(1):91-104. Epub 2016 Dec 8.

Rosalind & Morris Goodman Cancer Research Center and Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 1A3, Canada; Department of Biochemistry, McGill University and McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC H3A 1A3, Canada. Electronic address:

Identification of over 500 epigenetic regulators in humans raises an interesting question regarding how chromatin dysregulation contributes to different diseases. Bromodomain and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a multivalent chromatin regulator possessing three histone-binding domains, one non-specific DNA-binding module, and several motifs for interacting with and activating three lysine acetyltransferases. Genetic analyses of fish brpf1 and mouse Brpf1 have uncovered an important role in skeletal, hematopoietic, and brain development, but it remains unclear how BRPF1 is linked to human development and disease. Here, we describe an intellectual disability disorder in ten individuals with inherited or de novo monoallelic BRPF1 mutations. Symptoms include infantile hypotonia, global developmental delay, intellectual disability, expressive language impairment, and facial dysmorphisms. Central nervous system and spinal abnormalities are also seen in some individuals. These clinical features overlap with but are not identical to those reported for persons with KAT6A or KAT6B mutations, suggesting that BRPF1 targets these two acetyltransferases and additional partners in humans. Functional assays showed that the resulting BRPF1 variants are pathogenic and impair acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 23, an abundant but poorly characterized epigenetic mark. We also found a similar deficiency in different lines of Brpf1-knockout mice. These data indicate that aberrations in the chromatin regulator gene BRPF1 cause histone H3 acetylation deficiency and a previously unrecognized intellectual disability syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2016.11.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5223032PMC
January 2017

Mutations in the phosphatidylinositol glycan C () gene are associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability.

J Med Genet 2017 03 30;54(3):196-201. Epub 2016 Sep 30.

Monique and Jacques Roboh Department of Genetic Research, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.

Background: Of our 1400 exome-studied patients, 67% originate from consanguineous families. ∼80% suffer from variable degree of intellectual disability (ID). The search for disease causing genes using homozygosity mapping was progressing slowly until 2010, then markedly accelerated by the introduction of exome analysis.

Objectives: To identify the disease causing mutation(s) in three patients from two unrelated families who suffered from global developmental delay, severe ID and drug-responsive seizure disorder.

Methods: Exome analysis was performed in DNA of the three patients. The identified variants were generated and transfected into PIGC-defective mouse cells and the restoration of the surface expression of mouse CD90, CD48 and FLAER was assessed using flow cytometry. The expression of these proteins was also studied on the surface of patients' leucocytes.

Results: Three mutations were identified; homozygous p.L189W in one family and compound heterozygosity for p.L212P/p.R21X variants in another. participates in the biosynthesis of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor which tethers proteins to plasma membrane. In cells lacking PIGC protein, which were transfected with each of the PIGC variants, we detected a clear reduction of surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins. Furthermore, analyses of patients' leucocytes showed significant and constant decrease of CD16 surface expression in granulocytes, and moderate decrease of CD14, CD55, CD59 and FLAER levels.

Conclusions: joins the list of genes in which mutations result in defective biosynthesis of GPI anchoring, manifesting by global developmental delay and seizure disorder. The lack of specific biomarker dictates exome sequencing as the diagnostic procedure of choice in similar patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2016-104202DOI Listing
March 2017

Mutations in KCNH1 and ATP6V1B2 cause Zimmermann-Laband syndrome.

Nat Genet 2015 Jun 27;47(6):661-7. Epub 2015 Apr 27.

Institute of Human Genetics, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Zimmermann-Laband syndrome (ZLS) is a developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism with gingival enlargement, intellectual disability, hypoplasia or aplasia of nails and terminal phalanges, and hypertrichosis. We report that heterozygous missense mutations in KCNH1 account for a considerable proportion of ZLS. KCNH1 encodes the voltage-gated K(+) channel Eag1 (Kv10.1). Patch-clamp recordings showed strong negative shifts in voltage-dependent activation for all but one KCNH1 channel mutant (Gly469Arg). Coexpression of Gly469Arg with wild-type KCNH1 resulted in heterotetrameric channels with reduced conductance at positive potentials but pronounced conductance at negative potentials. These data support a gain-of-function effect for all ZLS-associated KCNH1 mutants. We also identified a recurrent de novo missense change in ATP6V1B2, encoding the B2 subunit of the multimeric vacuolar H(+) ATPase, in two individuals with ZLS. Structural analysis predicts a perturbing effect of the mutation on complex assembly. Our findings demonstrate that KCNH1 mutations cause ZLS and document genetic heterogeneity for this disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ng.3282DOI Listing
June 2015

Presence of urotensin-II receptors at the cell nucleus: specific tissue distribution and hypoxia-induced modulation.

Int J Biochem Cell Biol 2012 Apr 9;44(4):639-47. Epub 2012 Jan 9.

Laboratoire d'études moléculaires et pharmacologiques des peptides, Université du Québec, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Ville de Laval, Qc, Canada.

Urotensin II (UII) and its receptor UT, are widely expressed in the cardiovascular and central nervous system, where they exert regulatory actions under both physiological and pathological conditions. Our study, aimed at investigating the presence of functional nuclear UT in various rat and monkey tissues as well as in human cell lines, demonstrated for the first time by Western blot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence a tissue-specific nuclear expression of this receptor (heart and central nervous system). This nuclear UT was further characterized pharmacologically through radioligand binding studies using specific ligands of the urotensinergic system, as well as somatostatin. In 2D-gel experiments, we observed the presence of different post-translational modifications between membrane and nuclear UT receptors in brain extracts. Transcription initiation assays showed de novo RNA synthesis caused by UII and Urotensin-related peptide (URP) which were inhibited by an UT antagonist urantide. In hypoxic/ischemic conditions, UT receptors were differentially modulated in regard to subcellular localization. Thus, the unique regiospecificity of the nuclear UT receptor along with its particular modulation under hypoxic conditions could indicate a specific and complementary physiological role that could be correlated with pro-angiogenic and/or neuromodulatory actions of UII, both in the cardiovascular and central nervous system.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocel.2011.12.022DOI Listing
April 2012