Publications by authors named "Thi Bich Thuy Nguyen"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Nutritional composition and antioxidant properties of the sim fruit (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa).

Food Chem 2015 Feb 23;168:410-6. Epub 2014 Jul 23.

Institut des Sciences de la Vie, UCLouvain, Belgium.

In this study, detailed chemical properties of sim (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Ait.) Hassk.) fruit including nutritional composition, phenolic content and antioxidant capacity were determined for the first time. A 150g serving of sim fruit contained high levels of dietary fibre (69.94-87.43% of Recommended Daily Intake (RDI)), α-tocopherol (38.90-51.87% RDI), manganese (>100% RDI), and copper (44.44% RDI) but low levels of protein (2.63% RDI), lipid (1.59-3.5% RDI), and sugars (5.65% RDI). The predominant fatty acid in the sim fruit sample was linoleic acid (75.36% of total fatty acids). Interestingly, total phenolics (49.21±0.35mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g dry weight (DW)) were particularly high and resulted in a high antioxidant capacity (431.17±14.56μmol Trolox equivalent (TE)/g DW). These results, together with our recent discovery of high amount of piceatannol, a stilbene with potent biological activities, highlight the potential of sim, an under-utilised plant species from South-East Asia, as a new source of health-promoting compounds including dietary fibres, essential fatty acids, and phenolic compounds.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.07.081DOI Listing
February 2015

Piceatannol, a potent bioactive stilbene, as major phenolic component in Rhodomyrtus tomentosa.

Food Chem 2013 Jun 10;138(2-3):1421-30. Epub 2012 Nov 10.

Institut des Sciences de la Vie, UCLouvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.

The sim fruit (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) has long been used in folk medicine to treat diarrhoea, dysentery, and to boost the immune system. The purpose of this work was to determine its phenolic profile and to evaluate the changes of content during maturation, as well as the variations induced by environmental conditions. Using HPLC-ESI-HR-MS, 19 phenolic compounds (PCs) were tentatively characterised and included stilbenes and ellagitannins as major components, followed by anthocyanins, flavonols, and gallic acid. PCs were then further quantified by HPLC-DAD. Piceatannol, a promising health-promoting stilbene component, was the major PC in the fruit with a concentration of 2.3mg/g dry weight at full maturity stage. This concentration is 1000-2000 times higher than that of red grapes, a major source of stilbene in the human diet. During maturation, the contents in piceatannol and other stilbenes, ellagitannins, and flavonols decreased while the anthocyanin content increased. Shade-grown sim fruits showed significantly higher piceatannol levels than sun-exposed fruits. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential of sim, an under-utilised plant species from South-East Asia, as a source of health-promoting fruits.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.10.125DOI Listing
June 2013

Isolation and characterization of Listeria monocytogenes from commercial asazuke (Japanese light pickles).

Int J Food Microbiol 2010 May 27;139(3):134-9. Epub 2010 Mar 27.

Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Immunology, Research Center for Animal Hygiene and Food Safety, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan.

Asazuke is a ready-to-eat Japanese light pickle, mainly made of vegetables which are known to be one of the sources of Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Although asazuke is a popular side-dish in Japan, the hazard of bacterial contamination has not been evaluated yet. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of L. monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) and coliforms in 108 asazuke samples that randomly collected from supermarkets in Obihiro (Hokkaido prefecture, Japan) during the period of June to November 2007. Twelve (11.11%) L. monocytogenes were isolated with predominant serotype 4b (seven isolates) followed by 1/2a (two isolates), 1/2b, 3b and 4c (one isolate each) while Salmonella spp., VTEC and coliforms were not detected. All L. monocytogenes isolates demonstrated hemolytic activity by CAMP test and possessed all the virulence-associated genes (prfA, actA, mpl, inlA, inlC, plcA, plcB, hly, iap, clpC and opuCA) as resulted in PCR, thus revealed their potential pathogenicity. Moreover, 7 out of 12 isolates were from asazuke samples produced by the same factory and their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles suggested that 6 of them were indistinguishable and one was different. L. monocytogenes contamination in the asazuke factory environment was further investigated and 23 out of 60 environmental swabs (38.33%) contained the bacterium. Comparison of PFGE profiles showed relatedness between food and environmental isolates indicating that contamination probably occurred in the asazuke factory during manufacturing. Interestingly, after HACCP training course conducted to the factory workers, 20 samples collected during the period of November to December 2008 were negative to L. monocytogenes revealing that the hygienic status has improved.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2010.03.025DOI Listing
May 2010
-->