Dr Theophilus I Emeto, PhD, MSc, BSc (Hons) - James Cook University - Lecturer

Dr Theophilus I Emeto

PhD, MSc, BSc (Hons)

James Cook University

Lecturer

QLD | Australia

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-3282-1861

Dr Theophilus I Emeto, PhD, MSc, BSc (Hons) - James Cook University - Lecturer

Dr Theophilus I Emeto

PhD, MSc, BSc (Hons)

Introduction

I began my professional life as a research scientist and progressed into public health to fulfil a desire to make a positive difference to the health of under-served populations based on two strategies. First, to teach research professionals the best way to undertake research whilst critically judging the evidence to improve their practice. Second to undertake research and help build research capability within the tropics, which is one of James Cook University’s strategic focus. While my high level statistical analysis skill allow me to be involved in, and support a diversity of research, my key strengths and passion is in applying public health principles in the detection, diagnosis, monitoring, therapy and management of chronic inflammatory diseases including peripheral artery disease and tuberculosis (TB).
Currently I am part of a team working on a project focussed on incorporating key elements of both innate and adaptive immune response and the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of current treatment regimen to explore the efficacy of various dosing combinations in optimising treatment regimen for multi-drug resistant TB.

Primary Affiliation: James Cook University - QLD , Australia

Metrics

Number of Publications

38

Publications

Number of Profile Views

1999

Profile Views

Number of Article Reads

593

Reads

Number of PubMed Central Citations

82

PubMed Central Citations

Education

Jun 2009 - Oct 2013
James Cook University
PhD
Sep 2006 - Dec 2007
University of Nottingham
MSc Immunology and Allergy (Distinction)
May 1997 - Feb 2001
University of Calabar
BSc(Hons)

Experience

Jan 2014 - Nov 2014
James Cook University
Consultant (ELISA Assays)
Jul 2013 - Jun 2014
James Cook University
Tutor
Sep 2013 - Dec 2013
James Cook University
Research Assistant
Feb 2013 - May 2013
James Cook University
Adjunct Lecturer
Dec 2008 - Jun 2009
University of Southampton
Research Assistant
Jan 2008 - Aug 2008
Oxford Biomedica Plc
Research Scientist
Jun 2014
James Cook University
Lecturer Biostatistics and Epidemiology

Top co-authors

Jonathan Golledge
Jonathan Golledge

College of Medicine and Dentistry

11
Joseph V Moxon
Joseph V Moxon

James Cook University

7
Paula Clancy
Paula Clancy

School of Medicine and Dentistry

3
Ian Gassiep
Ian Gassiep

Mater Health Services and Mater Medical Research Institute

2
Corey S Moran
Corey S Moran

School of Medicine and Dentistry

2
Matthew P Padula
Matthew P Padula

University of Technology Sydney

2
Paul E Norman
Paul E Norman

University of Western Australia

2
Lynn Woodward
Lynn Woodward

James Cook University

2
Catherine M Rush
Catherine M Rush

University of Glasgow

2

Publications

38Publications

593Reads

82PubMed Central Citations

Mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Australia and other high-income countries: Trends in perinatal exposure, demography and uptake of prevention strategies.

Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol 2018 Oct 22;58(5):499-505. Epub 2018 May 22.

College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

View Article
October 2018
20 Reads
1.62 Impact Factor

Correlation between serum cryptococcal antigen titre and meningitis in immunocompetent patients.

J Med Microbiol 2018 Oct 23;67(10):1515-1518. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

1​Pathology Queensland, Townsville Hospital, Douglas 4814, Australia.

View Article
October 2018
4 Reads
2.25 Impact Factor

Socio-economic composition of low-acuity paediatric presentation at a regional hospital emergency department.

J Paediatr Child Health 2018 Jun 4. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

Public Health and Tropical Medicine, College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

View Article
June 2018
16 Reads
1.19 Impact Factor

Occupational tuberculosis in healthcare workers in sub-Saharan Africa: A systematic review.

Arch Environ Occup Health 2018 Apr 27:1-14. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

a Public Health and Tropical Medicine , College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University , Townsville QLD , Australia.

View Article
April 2018
5 Reads
0.93 Impact Factor

Cryptococcal infections over a 15 year period at a tertiary facility & impact of guideline management.

Mycoses 2018 Apr 17. Epub 2018 Apr 17.

Infection Management Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia.

View Article
April 2018
16 Reads
1.80 Impact Factor

Review article: Paediatric status epilepticus in the pre-hospital setting: An update.

Emerg Med Australas 2017 Aug 18;29(4):383-390. Epub 2017 Jun 18.

Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

View Article
August 2017
35 Reads

High serum thrombospondin-1 concentration is associated with slower abdominal aortic aneurysm growth and deficiency of thrombospondin-1 promotes angiotensin II induced aortic aneurysm in mice.

Clin Sci (Lond) 2017 Jun 7;131(12):1261-1281. Epub 2017 Jun 7.

The Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia

View Article
June 2017
51 Reads
3 PubMed Central Citations(source)
5.60 Impact Factor

Attitudes to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents seeking health care for their children in two early parenting services in Australia.

J Clin Nurs 2017 Apr 23;26(7-8):1021-1030. Epub 2016 Nov 23.

Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia.

View Article
April 2017
40 Reads
1.23 Impact Factor

Use of Nanoparticles As Contrast Agents for the Functional and Molecular Imaging of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

Front Cardiovasc Med 2017 23;4:16. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Diseases, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia; Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, The Townsville Hospital, Townsville, QLD, Australia.

View Article
March 2017
37 Reads
1 PubMed Central Citation(source)

Aspirin for initial treatment and secondary prevention of acute stroke of unknown etiology in resource-constrained settings: a systematic review

Vol5 Issue1, EJCM .January 2017

European Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine

Objective: This study was done to assess the safety and efficacy of aspirin in the initial treatment and secondary prevention of acute stroke of undetermined or presumed ischemic etiology. Background: The use of aspirin for the initial treatment of acute stroke of unknown etiology in low-resource settings is often challenged by the lack of diagnostic brain imaging to confirm specific stroke type and guide treatment. Aspirin use carries a potential risk of causing or exacerbating cerebral hemorrhage which can be fatal or disabling. Hence, in developing countries only 3.8% of acute stroke patients take antiplatelet compared to 53.1% in high income countries. Methods: A systematic review of literature from the Cochrane library, Medline, Scopus and Google Scholar was done. Studies 1) involving patients with acute stroke of undetermined or presumed ischemic etiology, 2) involving the use of aspirin in the initial treatment and/or secondary prevention of acute stroke of unknown or presumed ischemic etiology, and 3) comparing aspirin to a control or other antiplatelet agent (s), were selected for the review. Results: There was homogeneity of results in support of aspirin use for the initial treatment and secondary prevention of acute stroke of unknown etiology. The studies showed significant reduction in in-hospital mortality, disability, stroke recurrence and risk of hemorrhagic stroke with the use of aspirin. Conclusion: Available evidence supported the use of aspirin for the initial treatment and secondary prevention of acute stroke of unknown or presumed ischemic etiology in resource-constrained settings, where brain imaging is unavailable to confirm stroke type.

View Article
January 2017
36 Reads

Emerging Therapeutic Potential of Nanoparticles in Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

Biomedicines 2016, 4, 20.

Biomedicines

Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with a five year survival rate of less than 5%, which is associated with late presentation. In recent years, research into nanomedicine and the use of nanoparticles as therapeutic agents for cancers has increased. This article describes the latest developments in the use of nanoparticles, and evaluates the risks and benefits of nanoparticles as an emerging therapy for pancreatic cancer. The Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist was used. Studies were extracted by searching the Embase, MEDLINE, SCOPUS, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases from inception to 18 March 2016 with no language restrictions. Clinical trials involving the use of nanoparticles as a therapeutic or prognostic option in patients with pancreatic cancer were considered. Selected studies were evaluated using the Jadad score for randomised control trials and the Therapy CA Worksheet for intervention studies. Of the 210 articles found, 10 clinical trials including one randomised control trial and nine phase I/II clinical trials met the inclusion criteria and were analysed. These studies demonstrated that nanoparticles can be used in conjunction with chemotherapeutic agents increasing their efficacy whilst reducing their toxicity. Increased efficacy of treatment with nanoparticles may improve the clinical outcomes and quality of life in patients with pancreatic cancer, although the long-term side effects are yet to be defined. The study registration number is CRD42015020009.

View Article
August 2016
41 Reads

Oxidative stress and abdominal aortic aneurysm: potential treatment targets.

Clin Sci (Lond) 2016 Mar;130(5):301-15

Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, James Cook Drive, Douglas, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, The Townsville Hospital, Townsville, QLD 4814, Australia

View Article
March 2016
30 Reads
14 PubMed Central Citations(source)
5.60 Impact Factor

Management of Eclampsia in an Unbooked Primigravida: A Case Report Showing the Impact of Cultural and Socio-Economic Factors on Health Outcomes

Int J Clin Case Stud 2015, 1: 109

International Journal of Clinical Case Studies

Eclampsia is characterised by the occurrence of one or more generalised tonic-clonic seizures in patients with severe preeclampsia in the absence of other neurologic conditions. The clinical features of eclampsia can present at any time during pregnancy, but are more common from the second trimester to the puerperium. This report presents the challenges encountered in the management of eclampsia in a remote setting of a developing country and the influence of cultural and socio-economic factors on health outcomes associated with this condition.

View Article
November 2015
45 Reads

Emerging Role of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in the Diagnostic Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer: a Systematic Review

Annals of the Australasian College of Tropical Medicine, 17 (1). p. 19

Annals of the Australasian College of Tropical Medicine

Background/Aims: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer associated death worldwide with a five year survival rate less than 5%. The poor prognosis is mainly due to late presentation in 80% of patients and its drug resistant nature. Most diagnoses are made using contrast-enhanced computed-tomography (CT) or magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) which have a limited sensitivity between 76-86%. Iron oxide nanoparticles are increasingly used in the diagnostic imaging of pancreatic cancer, due their ability to selectively target tumour cells thereby increasing image resolution. The aim of this study is to identify studies investigating the use of iron oxide nanoparticles in the diagnostic imaging of pancreatic cancer. Methods: A systematic review was performed using PubMed for records up to 2015. Search terms used included “iron oxide nanoparticles”, “pancreatic cancer” and “imaging”. Results: A total of 16 studies were identified evaluating the use of iron oxide nanoparticles in the imaging of pancreatic cancer in-vitro and in in-vivo animal models. Eight of the studies evaluated the use of superparamagnetic-iron-oxide-nanoparticles (SPION), they showed SPION significantly decrease the T2 and T2* relaxation times of tumour tissue, providing a high sensitivity for MRI. Similar results were seen in eight studies that investigated the use of iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to other molecules including gelatin, survivin, chemokine-receptor-4, silica-gold, endothelial-growth-factor-receptor, urokinase-receptor activator, Clostridium and a sonic-hedgehog target. Conclusion: Iron oxide nanoparticles in the form of SPION or conjugates are biocompatible and effective at targeting tumour cells and significantly attenuate MRI signals in T2-weighted images of pancreatic cancers from a range of cell lines.

View Article
October 2015
39 Reads

Mouse models of intracranial aneurysm.

Brain Pathol 2015 May 30;25(3):237-47. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

The Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia.

View Article
May 2015
53 Reads
2 PubMed Central Citations(source)
3.84 Impact Factor

Targets for medical therapy to limit abdominal aortic aneurysm progression.

Curr Drug Targets 2014 ;15(9):860-73

Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia.

View Article
April 2015
33 Reads
10 PubMed Central Citations(source)
3.02 Impact Factor

Proteomic and genomic analyses suggest the association of apolipoprotein C1 with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Proteomics Clin Appl 2014 Oct 19;8(9-10):762-72. Epub 2014 May 19.

Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.

View Article
October 2014
42 Reads
5 PubMed Central Citations(source)
2.68 Impact Factor

Urocortin 2 is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm and mediates anti-proliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells via corticotrophin releasing factor receptor 2.

Clin Sci (Lond) 2014 Apr;126(7):517-27

*The Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, James Cook Drive, Douglas, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia.

View Article
April 2014
46 Reads
5 PubMed Central Citations(source)
5.60 Impact Factor

Further evidence to support a role for urocortin 2 in heart failure.

Anadolu Kardiyol Derg 2012 Mar 26;12(2):121-2. Epub 2012 Jan 26.

View Article
March 2012
38 Reads
0.76 Impact Factor

Proteomic analysis of intra-arterial thrombus secretions reveals a negative association of clusterin and thrombospondin-1 with abdominal aortic aneurysm.

Atherosclerosis 2011 Dec 22;219(2):432-9. Epub 2011 Aug 22.

Vascular Biology Unit, School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Angus Smith Drive, Douglas, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia.

View Article
December 2011
44 Reads
7 PubMed Central Citations(source)
3.99 Impact Factor

Relevance of urocortins to cardiovascular disease.

J Mol Cell Cardiol 2011 Sep 12;51(3):299-307. Epub 2011 Jun 12.

Vascular Biology Unit, School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia.

View Article
September 2011
44 Reads
9 PubMed Central Citations(source)
4.66 Impact Factor

Diagnosis and monitoring of abdominal aortic aneurysm: current status and future prospects.

Curr Probl Cardiol 2010 Oct;35(10):512-48

Queensland Vascular Diagnostics.

View Article
October 2010
39 Reads
26 PubMed Central Citations(source)
3.00 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Jonathan Golledge
Jonathan Golledge

College of Medicine and Dentistry

11
Joseph V Moxon
Joseph V Moxon

James Cook University

7
Paula Clancy
Paula Clancy

School of Medicine and Dentistry

3
Ian Gassiep
Ian Gassiep

Mater Health Services and Mater Medical Research Institute

2
Corey S Moran
Corey S Moran

School of Medicine and Dentistry

2
Matthew P Padula
Matthew P Padula

University of Technology Sydney

2
Paul E Norman
Paul E Norman

University of Western Australia

2
Lynn Woodward
Lynn Woodward

James Cook University

2
Catherine M Rush
Catherine M Rush

University of Glasgow

2

Followers

Theophilus I Emeto
Theophilus I Emeto

James Cook University

Gerrard Rafferty
Gerrard Rafferty

King's College London