Publications by authors named "Theodore A Stern"

176 Publications

Intrusive-Destructive Behaviors: Novel Behavioral Presentations of Patients With Co-Occurring Tourette Syndrome, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2021 Jan 21;23(1). Epub 2021 Jan 21.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

The Psychiatric Consultation Service at Massachusetts General Hospital sees medical and surgical inpatients with comorbid psychiatric symptoms and conditions. During their twice-weekly rounds, Dr Stern and other members of the Consultation Service discuss diagnosis and management of hospitalized patients with complex medical or surgical problems who also demonstrate psychiatric symptoms or conditions. These discussions have given rise to rounds reports that will prove useful for clinicians practicing at the interface of medicine and psychiatry.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.20f02670DOI Listing
January 2021

A Prescription for Deprescribing Antipsychotics: Managing Polypharmacy in Schizophrenia.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2020 Dec 17;22(6). Epub 2020 Dec 17.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

The Psychiatric Consultation Service at Massachusetts General Hospital sees medical and surgical inpatients with comorbid psychiatric symptoms and conditions. During their twice-weekly rounds, Dr Stern and other members of the Consultation Service discuss diagnosis and management of hospitalized patients with complex medical or surgical problems who also demonstrate psychiatric symptoms or conditions. These discussions have given rise to rounds reports that will prove useful for clinicians practicing at the interface of medicine and psychiatry.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.20f02708DOI Listing
December 2020

Guanfacine for Hyperactive Delirium: A Case Series.

Psychosomatics 2020 Nov 13. Epub 2020 Nov 13.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2020.10.003DOI Listing
November 2020

Respiratory Failure Leading to Intubation in the Setting of Flibanserin Ingestion in a Toddler.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2020 10 1;22(5). Epub 2020 Oct 1.

Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

The Psychiatric Consultation Service at Massachusetts General Hospital sees medical and surgical inpatients with comorbid psychiatric symptoms and conditions. During their twice-weekly rounds, Dr Stern and other members of the Consultation Service discuss diagnosis and management of hospitalized patients with complex medical or surgical problems who also demonstrate psychiatric symptoms or conditions. These discussions have given rise to rounds reports that will prove useful for clinicians practicing at the interface of medicine and psychiatry.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.20f02633DOI Listing
October 2020

Weaning From Exogenous Sedation in the Era of COVID-19 Infection: Recommendations for Sedation and Its Discontinuation.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2020 Jul 16;22(4). Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

The Psychiatric Consultation Service at Massachusetts General Hospital sees medical and surgical inpatients with comorbid psychiatric symptoms and conditions. During their twice-weekly rounds, Dr Stern and other members of the Consultation Service discuss diagnosis and management of hospitalized patients with complex medical or surgical problems who also demonstrate psychiatric symptoms or conditions. These discussions have given rise to rounds reports that will prove useful for clinicians practicing at the interface of medicine and psychiatry.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.20f02686DOI Listing
July 2020

Delirium After Withdrawal From Valerian Root: A Case Report.

Psychosomatics 2020 Nov - Dec;61(6):787-790. Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2020.05.003DOI Listing
May 2020

An Intravenous Lorazepam Infusion for Dissociative Amnesia: A Case Report.

Psychosomatics 2020 Nov - Dec;61(6):814-818. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2020.01.009DOI Listing
February 2020

An Intravenous Lorazepam Infusion for Dissociative Amnesia: A Case Report.

Psychosomatics 2020 Nov - Dec;61(6):814-818. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2020.01.009DOI Listing
February 2020

Turning Oral Presentations at the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry's Annual Meeting Into Published Articles: A Review and Analysis.

Psychosomatics 2020 Jan - Feb;61(1):19-23. Epub 2019 Sep 9.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

Background: Oral presentations at academic conferences typically describe recent or ongoing research projects or provide literature reviews. However, conversion of these presentations into full-length journal articles is not routine.

Objective: We sought to assess the frequency with which oral presentations at the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry's annual meetings from 2012 to 2018 were turned into peer-reviewed publications and review the factors that affected publication of them.

Methods: Conference presentation titles and authors from the 2012-2018 Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Annual Meetings were searched using PubMed to find corresponding published reports by the presenters. Data were organized in an Excel spreadsheet, and the time to publication, the journals in which they were published, and general content areas were recorded and analyzed.

Results: Of the 287 oral presentations delivered during the study period, 47% were published in a peer-reviewed journal. Articles were published in 72 different journals; the journals that published the most articles were Psychosomatics, General Hospital Psychiatry, Psycho-oncology, Academic Psychiatry, and the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The most common subspecialty topics of the published articles were neuropsychiatry, psycho-oncology, surgery and transplantation, and delirium. The mean time to publication after presentation was 1 year.

Conclusion: Knowledge of the rate at which presentations are converted into peer-reviewed publications can be used to enhance the academic success of presenters, and strategies to enhance the rate of publication (e.g., by coaching on scientific writing or by selecting oral presentations with the highest publication potential) can be established.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2019.08.010DOI Listing
January 2021

Advancing the Mission of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Through Innovation in Teaching.

Psychosomatics 2019 Nov - Dec;60(6):539-548. Epub 2019 Aug 1.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Background: Consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry, similar to other medical specialties, relies on the education of students, residents, fellows, and life-long learners for growth of the field. C-L psychiatry is unique as it exists at the intersection of psychiatry with other medical subspecialties. Traditional teaching methods have been used in C-L psychiatry programs for more than 50 years, while technology has recently advanced as available resources and the learning styles of today's learners have evolved. A growing number of younger trainees are taking advantage of new ways to learn.

Objectives: We sought to examine both traditional and novel teaching methodologies and how each of these educational methodologies fits within adult learning theory and in the context of how digital natives learn about C-L psychiatry.

Methods: In this narrative review, we drew upon the experiences of the authors as both life-long learners and educators. We then reviewed the literature pertaining to teaching methods that have been used in C-L psychiatry as well as emerging methods that could potentially be used in C-L psychiatry.

Results: C-L psychiatry has used traditional teaching methods such as readings, didactic lectures, case-based rounds, and problem-based learning. Novel teaching methodologies such as teaching rotations, simulations, social media, podcasts, movie clubs, and the use of mobile tablet computers have been used in general psychiatry and other medical specialties, while literature specific to C-L psychiatry was sparse.

Conclusions: Opportunities abound to make use of new teaching methodologies and technologies to appeal to future generations of C-L psychiatrists.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2019.07.007DOI Listing
August 2020

Capacity Assessment and Involuntary Commitment in Psychiatric and Medical Settings: Clinical, Legal, and Cultural Considerations.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2019 Jun 27;21(3). Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.19f02472DOI Listing
June 2019

Publishing Case Reports: Educational Strategies and Content Recommendations.

Psychosomatics 2019 Jul - Aug;60(4):361-364. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

Background: Case reports continue to serve as valuable educational tools; they facilitate case-based learning and provide excellent opportunities for collaboration.

Objective: Our aim was to review the benefits of writing case reports and to analyze the characteristics of case reports published in a journal that focuses on care at the interface of psychiatry and medicine.

Methods: The literature on writing case reports as tools for medical education was reviewed. Then, case reports published in Psychosomatics were examined, and quantitative data (e.g., subjective quality measures, number of references and authors) were recorded.

Results: Of the 76 case reports published during a 3-year span (2015-2017), the majority examined an unusual presentation or treatment (86%), used an approach to teaching and critical thinking (84%), provided a sizable literature review (80%), and discussed a differential diagnosis of signs, symptoms, and disorders (53%).

Conclusions: Case reports provide intellectually-challenging opportunities for learning that foster scientific thought, encourage the use of evidence-based medicine, improve writing and critical thinking, provide experience with the peer-review process, and help to develop skills needed to write scholarly publications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2019.02.009DOI Listing
May 2020

Self-inflicted Limb Amputation: A Case of Nonparaphilic, Nonpsychotic Xenomelia.

Psychosomatics 2020 Jan - Feb;61(1):70-75. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

The Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2019.03.004DOI Listing
January 2021

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Substitution as a Cause of Functional Neurological Disorder.

Psychosomatics 2020 Jan - Feb;61(1):81-85. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2019.03.003DOI Listing
January 2021

Rules Imposed by Providers on Medical and Surgical Inpatients With Substance Use Disorders: Arbitrary or Appropriate?

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2018 Nov 8;20(6). Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Fruit St WRN 605, Boston, MA 02114.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.18f02341DOI Listing
November 2018

Recommendations for QTc Monitoring: Rational or Arbitrary?

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2018 Oct 4;20(5). Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Fruit St WRN 605, Boston, MA 02114.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.18f02327DOI Listing
October 2018

Cultural Humility for Consultation-Liaison Psychiatrists.

Psychosomatics 2018 11 28;59(6):554-560. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

MGH Depression Clinical and Research Program, Boston, MA.

Background: Case presentation and analysis is a useful way to revisit key clinical themes, broad concepts, and teach others, especially when it comes to cross-cultural clinical issues. Patients from different cultural backgrounds tend to have different explanatory models of illnesses and related help seeking behaviors. Ineffective communication between clinicians and patients from nonmajority cultural groups may lead to less satisfaction with care and disparities in access to health care and in treatment outcomes.

Conclusions: To address health disparities, psychiatrists need to be able to understand the illness beliefs of all patients, particularly those from diverse cultural backgrounds. Using cultural humility to work with patients from all cultures by understanding the patients' values and preferences is a key attitude for successful cross-cultural clinical encounters.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2018.06.004DOI Listing
November 2018

Engaging the Resistant Patient in the Implementation of Interventions.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2018 May 31;20(3). Epub 2018 May 31.

Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Fruit St, WRN 605, Boston, MA 02114.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.17f02136DOI Listing
May 2018

"Moon River": Intact Musical Appreciation and Performance in a Man With Semantic Variant Primary Progressive Aphasia.

Psychosomatics 2019 Jan - Feb;60(1):70-74. Epub 2018 Apr 3.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School Boston, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2018.03.013DOI Listing
August 2019

Residents' Experiences with Mentorship in Academic Medicine.

Acad Psychiatry 2019 Feb 3;43(1):71-75. Epub 2018 May 3.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Objective: Although mentorship is essential for the professional development of physicians, the literature on trainees' mentorship experiences and perceptions of effective mentoring is more limited. This descriptive study examines residents' experiences of mentoring and their perceptions about the impact of mentorship on professional development, comparing experiences in mentoring that is assigned versus self-initiated.

Methods: A web-based self-administered cross-sectional survey of all senior residents (≥PGY-3) at a major urban academic medical center was conducted from March 27 to May 31, 2015.

Results: Of the 327 eligible senior residents, 204 (62%) responded and completed the survey. Most residents (82%) reported multiple mentors and 65% reported that their primary mentorship relationship was self-initiated. Residents who self-initiated their primary mentorship were significantly more likely to strongly/somewhat agree that their mentor had a positive impact on publications and scholarly projects (88 vs 44%, p = 0.0063) as well as research (88 vs 55%, p = 0.0001) compared to residents with assigned mentorship, with no significant differences measured by gender, race, or ethnicity. Forty-four percent of residents indicated they had unmet needs for mentoring in at least one of several professional areas.

Conclusions: Most residents perceive mentoring relationships as important to many aspects of their career development. Still 44% of residents reported unmet needs for mentoring in one or more areas, a result that needs further exploration. Since the majority of residents' primary mentoring relationships were self-initiated rather than assigned, and these were seen as more important for research and publications, programs should consider how to support the connection between residents and potential mentors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40596-018-0924-4DOI Listing
February 2019

Catatonia: An Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2018 01 4;20(1). Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.17f02202DOI Listing
January 2018

Providing Care for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Immigrants at Health Centers and Clinics.

Psychosomatics 2018 Mar - Apr;59(2):193-198. Epub 2017 Oct 23.

Department of Psychiatry (A.S.K., T.A.S.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA; Department of Psychiatry (A.S.K., M.J.M.), Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2017.10.008DOI Listing
March 2019

Obstructive Sleep Apnea as a Complication of Bipolar Disorder and Its Treatment: A Review and Approach to Management.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2017 Nov 30;19(6). Epub 2017 Nov 30.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Fruit St, WRN 605, Boston, MA 02114.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.17f02194DOI Listing
November 2017

Challenges Faced When Caring for Foreign Nationals With Comorbid Medical and Psychiatric Problems in the General Hospital.

Psychosomatics 2018 Jan - Feb;59(1):95-100. Epub 2017 Oct 10.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2017.10.002DOI Listing
February 2019

Postpartum Fecal and Flatal Incontinence: Silence, Stigma, and Psychological Interventions.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2017 Oct 5;19(5). Epub 2017 Oct 5.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.17f02164DOI Listing
October 2017

A Web-Based Lifestyle Medicine Curriculum: Facilitating Education About Lifestyle Medicine, Behavioral Change, and Health Care Outcomes.

JMIR Med Educ 2017 Sep 11;3(2):e14. Epub 2017 Sep 11.

Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, MA, United States.

Background: Lifestyle medicine is the science and application of healthy lifestyles as interventions for the prevention and treatment of disease, and has gained significant momentum as a specialty in recent years. College is a critical time for maintenance and acquisition of healthy habits. Longer-term, more intensive web-based and in-person lifestyle medicine interventions can have a positive effect. Students who are exposed to components of lifestyle medicine in their education have improvements in their health behaviors. A semester-long undergraduate course focused on lifestyle medicine can be a useful intervention to help adopt and sustain healthy habits.

Objective: To describe a novel, evidence based curriculum for a course teaching the concepts of Lifestyle Medicine based on a web-based course offered at the Harvard Extension School.

Methods: The course was delivered in a web-based format. The Lifestyle Medicine course used evidence based principles to guide students toward a "coach approach" to behavior change, increasing their self-efficacy regarding various lifestyle-related preventive behaviors. Students are made to understand the cultural trends and national guidelines that have shaped lifestyle medicine recommendations relating to behaviors. They are encouraged to engage in behavior change. Course topics include physical activity, nutrition, addiction, sleep, stress, and lifestyle coaching and counseling. The course addressed all of the American College of Preventive Medicine/American College of Lifestyle Medicine competencies save for the competency of office systems and technologies to support lifestyle medicine counseling.

Results: The course was well-received, earning a ranking of 4.9/5 at the school.

Conclusions: A novel, semester-long course on Lifestyle Medicine at the Harvard Extension School is described. Student evaluations suggest the course was well-received. Further research is needed to evaluate whether such a course empowers students to adopt behavior changes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/mededu.7587DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5613210PMC
September 2017

Avery D. Weisman, M.D.

Psychosomatics 2017 Nov - Dec;58(6):592-593. Epub 2017 Aug 12.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachuetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2017.08.007DOI Listing
August 2017

Meeting Its Mission: Does Psychosomatics Align With the Mission of Its Parent Organization, the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine?

Psychosomatics 2017 Jul - Aug;58(4):375-385. Epub 2017 Mar 8.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

Background: The vision and mission statements of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine (APM) indicate that the APM should promote excellence in clinical care for patients with comorbid psychiatric and general medical conditions by seeking to influence research, public policy, and interdisciplinary education.

Objective: As the APM owns the journal, Psychosomatics, we sought to assess whether the APM's journal was fulfilling the vision and mission of its parent organization by reviewing the content of articles published in the journal to determine whether it sufficiently addresses the various clinical care knowledge areas it seeks to influence.

Methods: We categorized content in all review articles, case reports, and original research articles published in Psychosomatics in 2015 and 2016. Each article was assigned to as many categories that it covered.

Results: In the 163 articles reviewed, the most frequently covered fund of knowledge area was psychiatric morbidity in medical populations (44.2%); among psychiatric disorders, mood disorders (22.1%), psychiatric disorders due to a general medical condition or toxic substance (21.5%), anxiety disorders (14.7%), and delirium (13.5) were the most frequently covered. Of the medical and surgical topics, neurology (19.6%), coping with chronic illness/psychological response to illness (17.8%), toxicology (11.7%), outpatient medicine (10.4%), and cardiology (9.8%) appeared most often.

Conclusions: Psychosomatics appears to be successfully providing content relevant to the APM's vision and mission statements and to practitioners of psychosomatic medicine.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2017.03.008DOI Listing
April 2018

Enhancing Delirium Case Definitions in Electronic Health Records Using Clinical Free Text.

Psychosomatics 2017 Mar - Apr;58(2):113-120. Epub 2016 Oct 27.

Division of Clinical Research, Center for Quantitative Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.

Background: Delirium is an acute confusional state, associated with morbidity and mortality in diverse medically ill populations. Delirium is preventable and treatable when diagnosed but the diagnosis is often missed. This important and difficult diagnosis is an attractive candidate for computer-aided decision support if it can be reliably identified at scale.

Objective: Here, using an electronic health record-based case definition of delirium, we characterize incidence of this highly morbid condition in 2 large academic medical centers.

Methods: Using the electronic health record of 2 large New England academic medical centers, we calculated and compared the rate of the diagnosis of delirium using a range of administrative and discharge summary text-based case definitions over an 8-year period.

Results: Depending on case definitions, the overall delirium rate ranged from 2.0-5.4% of 809,512 admissions identified. The identified rate of delirium increased between 2005 and 2013, such that by the final year of the study, one of the two sites reported delirium in 7.0% of cases. The concordance between case definitions was low; only half of the cases identified by text analysis were captured by administrative data.

Conclusion: Delirium may be better captured by composite outcomes, including both administrative claims data and elements drawn from unstructured data sources. That the rate of delirium observed in this study is far lower than the current literature estimates suggests that further work on case definitions, identification, and documented diagnosis is required.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2016.10.007DOI Listing
November 2017

Increasing Knowledge and Confidence in Behavioral Change: A Pilot Study.

Prim Care Companion CNS Disord 2016 Nov 24;18(6). Epub 2016 Nov 24.

Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Fruit St, WRN 605, Boston, MA 02114.

Objective: To assess whether and how effectively an interactive presentation about lifestyle medicine could impact the knowledge and attitudes of medical students to prepare them for managing chronic conditions in their patients. Chronic diseases are increasingly prevalent and problematic. Although chronic disease management involves lifestyle modification, few physicians are adequately trained in effective motivational interventions.

Methods: We surveyed first- and second-year Harvard Medical School students in October 2015 before and after a presentation on lifestyle medicine and quantified changes in their knowledge, attitudes/confidence, and skills.

Results: Medical students learned the basics of behavioral change after a 1-hour presentation, and their confidence with regard to implementing interventions increased. Median scores of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes improved as did their ability to counsel patients on exercise, nutrition, sleep, stress management, and smoking cessation.

Conclusions: After a brief intervention, medical students can learn principles of behavioral management and how to implement the skills with patients suffering from chronic illnesses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/PCC.16m01962DOI Listing
November 2016