Publications by authors named "Thekla Dushe"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Clinical functional MRI of the language domain in children with epilepsy.

Hum Brain Mapp 2011 Nov 22;32(11):1882-93. Epub 2010 Dec 22.

Department of Pediatric Neurology and Developmental Medicine, Children's Hospital, University of Tübingen, Germany.

Functional MRI (fMRI) for the assessment of language functions is increasingly used in the diagnostic workup of patients with epilepsy. Termed "clinical fMRI," such an approach is also feasible in children who may display specific patterns of language reorganization. This study was aimed at assessing language reorganization in pediatric epilepsy patients, using fMRI. We studied 26 pediatric epilepsy patients (median age, 13.05 years; range, 5.6-18.7 years) and 23 healthy control children (median age, 9.37 years; range, 6.2-15.4 years), using two child-friendly fMRI tasks and adapted data-processing streams. Overall, 81 functional series could be analyzed. Reorganization seemed to occur primarily in homotopic regions in the contralateral hemisphere, but lateralization in the frontal as well as in the temporal lobes was significantly different between patients and controls. The likelihood to find atypical language organization was significantly higher in patients. Additionally, we found significantly stronger activation in the healthy controls in a primarily passive task, suggesting a systematic confounding influence of antiepileptic medication. The presence of a focal cortical dysplasia was significantly associated with atypical language lateralization. We conclude that important confounds need to be considered and that the pattern of language reorganization may be distinct from the patterns seen in later-onset epilepsy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.21156DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6869929PMC
November 2011

Why one task is not enough: functional MRI for atypical language organization in two children.

Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2010 Nov 26;14(6):474-8. Epub 2010 May 26.

Department of Pediatric Neurology and Developmental Medicine, Children's Hospital, University of Tübingen, Germany.

Functional MRI is increasingly used to determine the hemispheric dominance for language. This is especially relevant in children who may not be able to comply with the high demands of a Wada test. We here report on two children in which the full extent of language reorganization was only determined when two fMRI tasks were analyzed; in the first case, the results from the second task corroborated the shifted hemispheric dominance seen in the first task. In the second case, the second task showed an opposite hemispheric dominance, suggesting a hemispheric dissociation of language functions. These cases underline the necessity to use more than one fMRI task for the determination of hemispheric dominance, whenever possible. This is particularly relevant in children as unusual patterns of reorganization may be more likely.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpn.2010.05.002DOI Listing
November 2010

Observational study to compare the clinical efficacy of the natural surfactants Alveofact and Curosurf in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants.

Respir Med 2007 Jan 15;101(1):169-76. Epub 2006 May 15.

Clinic of Neonatology (Charité Campus Mitte), Humboldt-University Berlin, Berlin.

Introduction: Natural surfactants have been shown to be superior to synthetic surfactants in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). In Germany, Alveofact (A) and Curosurf (C) are the most frequently used natural surfactant preparations. The aim of this retrospective, observational study was to compare the effects of A and C on gas exchange and outcome in premature infants.

Methods: During a 5-year period in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), 187 premature infants were treated with surfactant, with 82 receiving A and 105 receiving C. We recorded F(I)O(2) and gas exchange (PaO(2)/F(I)O(2) ratio, PaCO(2), SaO(2)) during the first 72h after surfactant application and the incidence of outcome parameters at day 28 (bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH grade III or IV), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), pneumothorax, necrotizing enterocolites (NEC) and death). The differences between the patient groups were assessed by ANOVA or the calculation of relative risks. Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons.

Results: There were no statistically significant differences between infants treated with A and C in mean gestational age (28.4 vs. 28.4 weeks), birth weight (1210 vs.1258 g) and time of first surfactant application (60 vs. 90 min postnatal). We observed no significant between group differences in course of F(I)O(2) and blood gases, or in incidence at day 28 of BPD (41.7% vs. 42.8%), IVH III/IV (18.3% vs. 14.3%), pneumothorax (9.8% vs. 4.8%), PDA (23.2% vs. 21.9%), PVL (7.3% vs. 9.5%) and death (17% vs. 17.1%). There were also no statistically significant differences in the subgroup of infants <28 weeks. The lower incidence of NEC in A compared with C (1.2% vs. 10.5%, P=0.01) was not statistically significant after Bonferroni correction.

Conclusion: Independent of gestational age no significant difference in the clinical efficacy of A and C was observed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2006.03.033DOI Listing
January 2007