Publications by authors named "Tetsuya Ueki"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Relationship Between Constipation and Medication.

J UOEH 2019 ;41(2):145-151

Department of Pharmacy Practice, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University.

Constipation is very common and can be caused by adverse drug reactions as a result of many drugs. While the adverse effects of several medications such as opioids and anticholinergic agents are well established and well known, other commonly prescribed drugs, such as hypnotics, are less well understood. This review presents the results of an analysis of the relationship between constipation and drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7888/juoeh.41.145DOI Listing
December 2019

Epstein-Barr virus clonality and plasmacytosis in a patient with atypical angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma.

Ann Hematol 2018 Mar 30;97(3):537-539. Epub 2017 Nov 30.

Department of Hematology, Yamagata Prefectural Central Hospital, Yamagata, 990-2292, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-017-3189-1DOI Listing
March 2018

Pseudo-grey platelet syndrome in a pregnant patient.

Br J Haematol 2017 09 23;178(6):836. Epub 2017 Jun 23.

Department of Hematology, Yamagata Prefectural Central Hospital, Yamagata, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.14808DOI Listing
September 2017

Cross-sectional study on relationship between constipation and medication in consideration of sleep disorder.

Yakugaku Zasshi 2011 ;131(8):1225-32

Department of Pharmacy, Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Japan.

Constipation can be caused by adverse drug reactions as a result of many drugs and might be induced by sleep disorders; however, the relative risk of its occurrence with individual drugs and the influence of sleep conditions have not been clarified. To clarify the relationship between constipation and various drugs in consideration of sleep disorders, we investigated the self-reported bowel habits, use of laxatives, and the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS, a self-administered psychometric instrument to measure insomnia) in 344 inpatients on admission. They were divided into a constipation group (self-reported bowel habits of "Constipation" or "Occasional constipation" and/or use of laxatives, n=161) and a non-constipation group (both "Normal" and the non-use of laxatives, n=183). A comparison of the backgrounds of the two patient groups revealed significant differences in age, gender, number of used drugs, AIS score, hypothyroidism, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, use of diuretics, coronary vasodilators, thyroid hormones, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors, antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, and hypnotics. Multiple logistic regression analysis using these fourteen factors as autonomous variables showed that age (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.04; p=0.007), female gender (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.21-3.18; p=0.006), the AIS score (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.02-1.18; p=0.010), and the use of hypnotics (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.30-4.16; p=0.004) were significantly related to constipation; therefore, as hypnotics appear more likely to cause constipation than other drugs, they should be used with caution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/yakushi.131.1225DOI Listing
February 2012

Case-controlled study on risk factors for the development of constipation in hospitalized patients.

Yakugaku Zasshi 2011 Mar;131(3):469-76

Department of Pharmacy, Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital.

Constipation is a common problem in hospitalized patients; however, the relative risks of its development with various factors have not been clarified. To clarify the risk factors associated with constipation, we performed a case-controlled study of 165 hospitalized patients who were not laxative users on admission. They were divided into case (n=35) and control (n=130) groups according to laxative administration during hospitalization. Comparison of the patient backgrounds in the two groups revealed significant differences in the activities of daily living, length of fasting, rest level on admission, cerebrovascular disease, and administration of hypnotics. Multiple logistic regression analysis using these five factors as autonomous variables showed that administration of hypnotics (odds ratio, 2.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-7.06; p=0.031) was significantly related to laxative use. Therefore, the administration of hypnotics may be the principal cause of constipation development in hospitalized patients and they should be used with caution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/yakushi.131.469DOI Listing
March 2011
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