Publications by authors named "Tetsuhiro Fukuyama"

34 Publications

Treatment of neurodegenerative CNS disease in Langerhans cell histiocytosis with a combination of intravenous immunoglobulin and chemotherapy.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2008 Feb;50(2):308-11

Division of Pediatrics, Takasago-seibu Hospital, Takasago, Japan.

Background: In rare cases, patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) develop neurodegenerative CNS disease (ND-CNS-LCH). Management of ND-CNS-LCH has not been established.

Methods: We treated five pediatric patients with a combination of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and chemotherapy (steroid +/- vinblastine +/- 6-mercaptopurine +/- methotrexate). Prior to the therapy, three of the five patients had cerebellar ataxia while the remaining two had abnormal MRI findings without apparent neurological deficits. IVIG was given monthly or twice monthly at the dosage of 250-400 mg/kg/dose.

Results: The four patients administered more than 23 doses of IVIG and chemotherapy remained in a stable condition and did not show significant progression signs in neurological deficits or brain MRI findings during the 30-month follow-up period (median; range: 19+ to 38+) following the initiation of therapy for ND-CNS-LCH.

Conclusion: The IVIG-containing treatment may be promising for ND-CNS-LCH; however, its effectiveness remains to be further tested in more patients as well as in a randomized trial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.21259DOI Listing
February 2008

Functional role of lingual nerve in breastfeeding.

Int J Dev Neurosci 2007 Apr 7;25(2):115-9. Epub 2007 Jan 7.

Department of Anatomy, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621, Japan.

Functional role of lingual nerve in breastfeeding was investigated in rat pups during the suckling period. DiI, a postmortem neuronal tracer, was used to confirm the immature lingual nerve (LN) responsible for tongue sensation and resulted in successful fiber labeling anterogradely to the tongue, which showed different distribution patterns from fiber labeling derived from the hypoglossal nerve. Unilaterally LN-injured pups did not show suckling disturbance with absence of any shortening (P11 pups: 559+/-16s; 105% of the control value) in nipple attachment time and the survival rate remained high (P11: 100%). Bilaterally LN-injured pups showed suckling disturbance with marked shortening (P11 pups: 220+/-54 s; 42% of the control value) in nipple attachment time and a low survival rate (P1: 33%; P11: 41%). Bilaterally infraorbital nerve-injured or bilaterally bulbectomized pups did not show any nipple attachment at all and there were no survivors, confirming the crucial roles of upper lip sensation and olfaction in suckling. Based on these findings, we conclude that tongue sensation is very important, but not essential for suckling.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdevneu.2006.12.004DOI Listing
April 2007

Motor neurons essential for normal sciatic function in neonatally nerve-injured rats.

Neuroreport 2006 Jul;17(11):1149-52

Department of Anatomy, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan.

The present study was aimed to determine neuronal population essential for normal motor function in young adult rats receiving various degrees of crushing to the sciatic nerve at the neonatal stage. Motor function was estimated by the static sciatic index, and a neuronal tracer was applied to the common peroneal nerve. The total numbers of the tracer-labeled neurons of the nerve-crushed rats were 74-383 in the normal function group, 14-61 in the disordered function group, and 0-32 in the severely disordered function group. We conclude that normal motor function can be well preserved by a very small population of motor neurons (approximately 15% of the control value) in the neonatally sciatic nerve-injured rats.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.wnr.0000230502.47973.feDOI Listing
July 2006

Transplanted human amniotic epithelial cells express connexin 26 and Na-K-adenosine triphosphatase in the inner ear.

Transplantation 2004 May;77(9):1452-4

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Asahi, Matsumoto, Japan.

Cochlear fibrocytes are the crucial component of the inner ear homeostasis and its defect by various causes; GJB2 (connexin [Cx] 26) mutation, for example, leads to hearing loss. In the present study, we investigated the potential use of human amniotic epithelial cells, proposed to possess pluripotential properties, as a source of transplantation therapy in inner ear disease. The mRNA of the gap junction protein Cx26 and Na-K-adenosine triphosphatase, the immunohistologic expression of these proteins, and the cells' intercellular communication capacity were detected in vitro. Their transplantation into the guinea pig cochlea revealed the survival and expression of the proteins even 3 weeks after transplantation. Transplanted human amniotic epithelial cells were localized at the site where the proteins function, strongly indicating their cooperation in the regional potassium ion recycling. This technology suggests the therapeutic potential for the treatment of hearing loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007890-200405150-00023DOI Listing
May 2004