Publications by authors named "Tetsuharu Shinjyo"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ras-mediated up-regulation of survivin expression in cytokine-dependent murine pro-B lymphocytic cells.

Tohoku J Exp Med 2008 Sep;216(1):25-34

Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of the Ryukyus, School of Medicine, Okinawa, Japan.

Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, has been widely studied because of its aberrant expression in human cancer. Survivin has multiple functions, including cell-cycle regulation at mitosis, inhibition of apoptosis and caspase-independent cytoprotection. Clinical studies have shown that survivin is associated with resistance to treatment and its expression is linked to poor prognosis. Recent studies indicated that Ras pathways up-regulate survivin expression in hematopoietic cells. Here we analyzed downstream pathways of Ras in interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent Baf-3 murine-derived pro-B lymphocytic cells that express constitutively active Ras mutants, using signaling pathway-specific inhibitors. Both mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3-K) pathways are involved in the induction of survivin. Downstream of PI3-K, the signaling pathway is composed of two kinases, Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. In the downstream targets of PI3-K, mTOR but not Akt is responsible for survivin expression. Using a counterflow centrifugal elutriator, we observed G2/M phase-dominant survivin expression in Baf-3 cells. Interestingly, constitutively active Ras mutants also induced survivin in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Reporter assays of the survivin gene promoter revealed a transcriptional regulatory cis-acting region that is responsible for Ras signaling, indicating that Ras increases the transcription of the survivin gene through specific enhancer elements. These data illustrate the pathways regulating survivin expression by Ras. Ras activates the MAPK, PI3-K and mTOR pathways, and these signals enhance survivin transcription. Our data will provide the new information about mechanisms of survivin expression by Ras-signalling pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1620/tjem.216.25DOI Listing
September 2008

Establishment of a human herpes virus-8-negative malignant effusion lymphoma cell line (STR-428) carrying concurrent translocations of BCL2 and c-MYC genes.

Leuk Res 2007 Sep 21;31(9):1285-92. Epub 2007 Mar 21.

Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Internal Medicine, University of the Ryukyus School of Medicine, Okinawa, Japan.

A new cell line, STR-428 was established from ascites tumor cells of a malignant effusion lymphoma patient without human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) infection. STR-428 cells showed an immunophenotype of mature B-cells and produced few cytokines related to lymphomatous effusion. Karyotypic and genetic analysis revealed complex translocations including t(14;18)(q32;q21) effecting IgH/BCL2 and der(8)t(3;8)(q27;q24) involving c-MYC. STR-428 represents a unique, B-cell lymphoma cell line carrying concurrent rearrangement of BCL2 and c-MYC genes with features distinct from those of HHV-8-related primary effusion lymphoma. This cell line may be a valuable tool, other than HHV-8, to investigate the pathogenesis of primary lymphomatous effusion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.leukres.2006.12.023DOI Listing
September 2007

Structure of the human Bim gene and its transcriptional regulation in Baf-3, interleukin-3-dependent hematopoietic cells.

Mol Biol Rep 2005 Jun;32(2):79-85

Department of Molecular Oncology & Leukemia Program Project, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, 734-8553, Japan.

Deprivation of cytokines induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cytokine-dependent hematopoietic progenitors. Previous studies have indicated that in Baf-3, interleukin (IL)-3-dependent cells, apoptosis is caused predominantly by Bim, a BH3-only cell death activator that belongs to the Bcl-2 superfamily. Because Bim mRNA is induced by IL-3 starvation, we hypothesized that signals originating from the IL-3 receptor might regulate the expression of Bim at the level of its transcription. Here, we identified the transcriptional initiation site and three candidate remote enhancer/silencer regions of the Bim gene. We show that the region of the gene upstream of the initiation site exhibits strong promoter activity and that there are negative regulatory regions within the first intron. However, none of these transcriptional regulatory elements was IL-3-dependent. In addition, a nuclear run-off assay revealed a similar rate of transcription initiation in the absence or presence of IL-3. Although others have demonstrated the transcriptional regulation of Bim by nerve growth factor (NGF) in neuronally differentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, this is unlikely to be the mechanism through which IL-3 downregulates the expression of Bim in Baf-3 cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11033-004-7656-0DOI Listing
June 2005

Roles of Bim in apoptosis of normal and Bcr-Abl-expressing hematopoietic progenitors.

Mol Cell Biol 2004 Jul;24(14):6172-83

Department of Hematology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi, Japan.

Bcr-Abl kinase is known to reverse apoptosis of cytokine-dependent cells due to cytokine deprivation, although it has been controversial whether chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitors have the potential to survive under conditions in which there are limited amounts of cytokines. Here we demonstrate that early hematopoietic progenitors (Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) Lin(-)) isolated from normal mice rapidly undergo apoptosis in the absence of cytokines. In these cells, the expression of Bim, a proapoptotic relative of Bcl-2 which plays a key role in the cytokine-mediated survival system, is induced. In contrast, those cells isolated from our previously established CML model mice resist apoptosis in cytokine-free medium without the induction of Bim expression, and these effects are reversed by the Abl-specific kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate. In addition, the expression levels of Bim are uniformly low in cell lines established from patients in the blast crisis phase of CML, and imatinib induced Bim in these cells. Moreover, small interfering RNA that reduces the expression level of Bim effectively rescues CML cells from apoptosis caused by imatinib. These findings suggest that Bim plays an important role in the apoptosis of early hematopoietic progenitors and that Bcr-Abl supports cell survival in part through downregulation of this cell death activator.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/MCB.24.14.6172-6183.2004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC434248PMC
July 2004

Acute myeloid leukemia (FAB-M2) with a masked type of t(8;21) translocation revealed by spectral karyotyping.

Int J Hematol 2002 Nov;76(4):338-43

We report a case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), M2 subtype according to the French-American-British (FAB) classification, with extramedullary myeloblastoma of the uterus and a masked type of variant translocation of t(8;21)(q22;q22). A 45-year-old Japanese woman presented with metrorrhagia, and AML (M2) with uterine invasion was diagnosed. The patient received an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation after remission, and her pelvis was irradiated locally. Cytogenetic study at first showed t(8;17)(q22;p13) by G-banding. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) analysis modified this interpretation to a 3-way translocation involving chromosomes 8,17, and 21 and identified a masked type of variant t(8;21)(q22;q22) translocation. Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization using the AML1/ETO probe, and of detection of the AML1/ETO fusion transcript by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction were consistent with the karyotyping result. SKY analysis is useful to compensate for the limitations of cytogenetic studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02982693DOI Listing
November 2002

Establishment of a primary effusion lymphoma cell line (RM-P1) and in vivo growth system using SCID mice.

Int J Hematol 2002 Aug;76(2):165-72

Second Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukus, Nishihara, Okinawa, Japan.

Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is recognized as a unique lymphoma entity, which occurs exclusively in body cavities as a serous lymphomatous effusion without tumor formation or organ infiltration. We established a cell line of B-cell origin from a pericardial effusion of a 63-year-old Japanese PEL patient who did not have human immunodeficiency virus infection. This PEL cell line had human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. We named this cell line RM-P1. This cell line showed complex chromosomal abnormalities that could not be identified by G-banding. However, spectral karyotyping analysis determined the origin and organization of all unidentified chromosomal abnormalities. When inoculated into the peritoneal cavity of 8 severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice depleted of natural killer cells, RM-P1 cells induced solid tumor with ascites in all animals tested. These tumor and ascitic cells had the same immunogenotypic features as those of the original RM-P1. These 2 types of cells were positive for both HHV-8 and EBV as demonstrated using polymerase chain reaction. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses showed that neither tumors nor ascitic cells grown in SCID mice expressed leukocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1alpha (CD11a), LFA-1lbeta (CD18), LFA-2 (CD2), LFA-3 (CD58), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 (CD54), ICAM-2 (CD102), ICAM-3 (CD50), or leukocyte endothelial adhesion molecule (LECAM)-1 (CD62L), suggesting that these cytoadhesion molecules are not involved in tumor formation of RM-P1 cells in vivo. The establishment of the RM-P1 cell line and the animal model of PEL may provide insights for understanding the relationship between these viruses and PEL and for understand the mechanism for PEL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02982580DOI Listing
August 2002