Publications by authors named "Terri Blase"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Publishing a master's thesis: a guide for novice authors.

J Genet Couns 2010 Jun 14;19(3):217-27. Epub 2010 Jan 14.

Swedish Cancer Institute, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA.

Publication of original research, clinical experiences, and critical reviews of literature are vital to the growth of the genetic counseling field, delivery of genetic counseling services, and professional development of genetic counselors. Busy clinical schedules, lack of time and funding, and training that emphasizes clinical skills over research skills may make it difficult for new genetic counselors to turn their thesis projects into publications. This paper summarizes and elaborates upon a presentation aimed at de-mystifying the publishing process given at the 2008 National Society of Genetic Counselors Annual Education Conference. Specific topics include familiarizing prospective authors, particularly genetic counseling students, with the basics of the publication process and related ethical considerations. Former students' experiences with publishing master's theses also are described in hopes of encouraging new genetic counselors to submit for publication papers based on their thesis projects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-009-9276-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2874663PMC
June 2010

Sharing GJB2/GJB6 genetic test information with family members.

J Genet Couns 2007 Jun 23;16(3):313-24. Epub 2007 Feb 23.

Department of Biology, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA, USA.

Although GJB2/GJB6 genetic testing for non-syndromic hearing loss is available, there is no information regarding sharing of test results with family members. A qualitative study was conducted to elucidate if, how, and why parents of a child with hearing loss share GJB2/GJB6 test results with relatives. Parents whose child had testing (n = 7 positive, n = 4 negative, n = 1 inconclusive results) participated in a semi-structured interview and responses were analyzed using qualitative methods. All participants shared the test result with at least one relative, but selective non-disclosure also was observed. Reasons for, and reactions to, sharing were diverse and differed as a function of test result. In comparing the results from this study to published literature, similarities and differences were identified with regards to disclosure of genetic test results for hearing loss versus other conditions. Differences suggest that hearing loss may have unique attributes that influence responses to genetic test information. Further research is needed to replicate these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-006-9066-zDOI Listing
June 2007