Publications by authors named "Tereza Mašínová"

7 Publications

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GlobalFungi, a global database of fungal occurrences from high-throughput-sequencing metabarcoding studies.

Sci Data 2020 07 13;7(1):228. Epub 2020 Jul 13.

Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

Fungi are key players in vital ecosystem services, spanning carbon cycling, decomposition, symbiotic associations with cultivated and wild plants and pathogenicity. The high importance of fungi in ecosystem processes contrasts with the incompleteness of our understanding of the patterns of fungal biogeography and the environmental factors that drive those patterns. To reduce this gap of knowledge, we collected and validated data published on the composition of soil fungal communities in terrestrial environments including soil and plant-associated habitats and made them publicly accessible through a user interface at https://globalfungi.com . The GlobalFungi database contains over 600 million observations of fungal sequences across > 17 000 samples with geographical locations and additional metadata contained in 178 original studies with millions of unique nucleotide sequences (sequence variants) of the fungal internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 representing fungal species and genera. The study represents the most comprehensive atlas of global fungal distribution, and it is framed in such a way that third-party data addition is possible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41597-020-0567-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7359306PMC
July 2020

A meta-analysis of global fungal distribution reveals climate-driven patterns.

Nat Commun 2019 11 13;10(1):5142. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 14220, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

The evolutionary and environmental factors that shape fungal biogeography are incompletely understood. Here, we assemble a large dataset consisting of previously generated mycobiome data linked to specific geographical locations across the world. We use this dataset to describe the distribution of fungal taxa and to look for correlations with different environmental factors such as climate, soil and vegetation variables. Our meta-study identifies climate as an important driver of different aspects of fungal biogeography, including the global distribution of common fungi as well as the composition and diversity of fungal communities. In our analysis, fungal diversity is concentrated at high latitudes, in contrast with the opposite pattern previously shown for plants and other organisms. Mycorrhizal fungi appear to have narrower climatic tolerances than pathogenic fungi. We speculate that climate change could affect ecosystem functioning because of the narrow climatic tolerances of key fungal taxa.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13164-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6853883PMC
November 2019

Bacteria from the endosphere and rhizosphere of Quercus spp. use mainly cell wall-associated enzymes to decompose organic matter.

PLoS One 2019 25;14(3):e0214422. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Departament of Soil Microbiology and Symbiotic Systems, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Granada, Spain.

Due to the ability of soil bacteria to solubilize minerals, fix N2 and mobilize nutrients entrapped in the organic matter, their role in nutrient turnover and plant fitness is of high relevance in forest ecosystems. Although several authors have already studied the organic matter decomposing enzymes produced by soil and plant root-interacting bacteria, most of the works did not account for the activity of cell wall-attached enzymes. Therefore, the enzyme deployment strategy of three bacterial collections (genera Luteibacter, Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter) associated with Quercus spp. roots was investigated by exploring both cell-bound and freely-released hydrolytic enzymes. We also studied the potential of these bacterial collections to produce enzymes involved in the transformation of plant and fungal biomass. Remarkably, the cell-associated enzymes accounted for the vast majority of the total activity detected among Luteibacter strains, suggesting that they could have developed a strategy to maintain the decomposition products in their vicinity, and therefore to reduce the diffusional losses of the products. The spectrum of the enzymes synthesized and the titres of activity were diverse among the three bacterial genera. While cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes were rather common among Luteibacter and Pseudomonas strains and less detected in Arthrobacter collection, the activity of lipase was widespread among all the tested strains. Our results indicate that a large fraction of the extracellular enzymatic activity is due to cell wall-attached enzymes for some bacteria, and that Quercus spp. root bacteria could contribute at different levels to carbon (C), phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) cycles.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0214422PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6433265PMC
December 2019

Clearcutting alters decomposition processes and initiates complex restructuring of fungal communities in soil and tree roots.

ISME J 2018 03 15;12(3):692-703. Epub 2018 Jan 15.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, Vídeňská 1083, 142 20, Praha 4, Czech Republic.

Forest management practices often severely affect forest ecosystem functioning. Tree removal by clearcutting is one such practice, producing severe impacts due to the total reduction of primary productivity. Here, we assessed changes to fungal community structure and decomposition activity in the soil, roots and rhizosphere of a Picea abies stand for a 2-year period following clearcutting compared to data from before tree harvest. We found that the termination of photosynthate flow through tree roots into soil is associated with profound changes in soil, both in decomposition processes and fungal community composition. The rhizosphere, representing an active compartment of high enzyme activity and high fungal biomass in the living stand, ceases to exist and starts to resemble bulk soil. Decomposing roots appear to separate from bulk soil and develop into hotspots of decomposition and important fungal biomass pools. We found no support for the involvement of ectomycorrhizal fungi in the decomposition of roots, but we found some evidence that root endophytic fungi may have an important role in the early stages of this process. In soil, activity of extracellular enzymes also decreased in the long term following the end of rhizodeposition by tree roots.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41396-017-0027-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5864242PMC
March 2018

Libkindia masarykiana gen. et sp. nov., Yurkovia mendeliana gen. et sp. nov. and Leucosporidium krtinense f.a. sp. nov., isolated from temperate forest soils.

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2017 Apr 5;67(4):902-908. Epub 2017 May 5.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, Vídeňská 1083, 14220 Praha 4, Czech Republic.

One hundred and ninety-eight isolates of soil yeasts were isolated from mixed temperate forests in the Czech Republic, and their abundance and distribution in the litter and soil were evaluated using amplicon sequencing of soil fungal communities. Abundant taxa with no close identified hits were selected for further characterization as potential novel species of yeasts. Phylogenetic analyses using sequences of the D1/D2 domain, the ITS region and RPB1 and TEF1 genes support the recognition of the following three novel species belonging to the subphylum Pucciniomycotina, class Microbotryomycetes: Leucosporidium krtinense f.a. sp. nov. (type strain PYCC 6879T=KT96T=CBS 14304T=DSM 101892T), Yurkovia mendeliana sp. nov. (type strain PYCC 6884T=KT152T=CBS 14273T=DSM 101889T) and Libkindia masarykiana sp. nov. (type strain PYCC 6886T=KT310T=CBS 14275T=DSM 101891T). Since the latter two novel taxa cannot be assigned to existing genera, two new genera, Libkindia gen. nov. and Yurkovia gen. nov., are also described.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/ijsem.0.001707DOI Listing
April 2017

Drivers of yeast community composition in the litter and soil of a temperate forest.

FEMS Microbiol Ecol 2017 02 27;93(2). Epub 2016 Oct 27.

Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, Institute of Microbiology of the CAS, Vídeňská 1083, 14220 Praha 4, Czech Republic.

Fungi represent a group of soil microorganisms fulfilling important ecological functions. Although several studies have shown that yeasts represent a significant proportion of fungal communities, our current knowledge is based mainly on cultivation experiments. In this study, we used amplicon sequencing of environmental DNA to describe the composition of yeast communities in European temperate forest and to identify the potential biotic and abiotic drivers of community assembly. Based on the analysis of ITS2 PCR amplicons, yeasts represented a substantial proportion of fungal communities ranging from 0.4 to 14.3% of fungal sequences in soil and 0.2 to 9.9% in litter. The species richness at individual sites was 28 ± 9 in soil and 31 ± 11 in litter. The basidiomycetous yeasts dominated over ascomycetous ones. In litter, yeast communities differed significantly among beech-, oak- and spruce-dominated stands. Drivers of community assembly are probably more complex in soils and comprise the effects of environmental conditions and vegetation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/femsec/fiw223DOI Listing
February 2017