Publications by authors named "Teresia Svensson"

13 Publications

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Chlorine cycling and the fate of Cl in terrestrial environments.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Feb 5;28(7):7691-7709. Epub 2021 Jan 5.

Department of Thematic Studies - Environmental Change, Linköping University, SE-581 83, Linkoping, Sweden.

Chlorine (Cl) in the terrestrial environment is of interest from multiple perspectives, including the use of chloride as a tracer for water flow and contaminant transport, organochlorine pollutants, Cl cycling, radioactive waste (radioecology; Cl is of large concern) and plant science (Cl as essential element for living plants). During the past decades, there has been a rapid development towards improved understanding of the terrestrial Cl cycle. There is a ubiquitous and extensive natural chlorination of organic matter in terrestrial ecosystems where naturally formed chlorinated organic compounds (Cl) in soil frequently exceed the abundance of chloride. Chloride dominates import and export from terrestrial ecosystems while soil Cl and biomass Cl can dominate the standing stock Cl. This has important implications for Cl transport, as chloride will enter the Cl pools resulting in prolonged residence times. Clearly, these pools must be considered separately in future monitoring programs addressing Cl cycling. Moreover, there are indications that (1) large amounts of Cl can accumulate in biomass, in some cases representing the main Cl pool; (2) emissions of volatile organic chlorines could be a significant export pathway of Cl and (3) that there is a production of Cl in tissues of, e.g. plants and animals and that Cl can accumulate as, e.g. chlorinated fatty acids in organisms. Yet, data focusing on ecosystem perspectives and combined spatiotemporal variability regarding various Cl pools are still scarce, and the processes and ecological roles of the extensive biological Cl cycling are still poorly understood.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-12144-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7854439PMC
February 2021

Influence of Multiple Environmental Factors on Organic Matter Chlorination in Podsol Soil.

Environ Sci Technol 2017 Dec 12;51(24):14114-14123. Epub 2017 Dec 12.

Department of Thematic Studies, Environmental Change, Linköping University , SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden.

Natural chlorination of organic matter is common in soils. The abundance of chlorinated organic compounds frequently exceeds chloride in surface soils, and the ability to chlorinate soil organic matter (SOM) appears widespread among microorganisms. Yet, the environmental control of chlorination is unclear. Laboratory incubations with Cl as a Cl tracer were performed to test how combinations of environmental factors, including levels of soil moisture, nitrate, chloride, and labile organic carbon, influenced chlorination of SOM from a boreal forest. Total chlorination was hampered by addition of nitrate or by nitrate in combination with water but enhanced by addition of chloride or most additions including labile organic matter (glucose and maltose). The greatest chlorination was observed after 15 days when nitrate and water were added together with labile organic matter. The effect that labile organic matter strongly stimulated the chlorination rates was confirmed by a second independent experiment showing higher stimulation at increased availability of labile organic matter. Our results highlight cause-effect links between chlorination and the studied environmental variables in podsol soil-with consistent stimulation by labile organic matter that did overrule the negative effects of nitrate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.7b03196DOI Listing
December 2017

The trans-continental distributions of pentachlorophenol and pentachloroanisole in pine needles indicate separate origins.

Environ Pollut 2017 Oct 13;229:688-695. Epub 2017 Jul 13.

Research Unit: Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.

The production and use of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was recently prohibited/restricted by the Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs), but environmental data are few and of varying quality. We here present the first extensive dataset of the continent-wide (Eurasia and Canada) occurrence of PCP and its methylation product pentachloroanisole (PCA) in the environment, specifically in pine needles. The highest concentrations of PCP were found close to expected point sources, while PCA chiefly shows a northern and/or coastal distribution not correlating with PCP distribution. Although long-range transport and environmental methylation of PCP or formation from other precursors cannot be excluded, the distribution patterns suggest that such processes may not be the only source of PCA to remote regions and unknown sources should be sought. We suggest that natural sources, e.g., chlorination of organic matter in Boreal forest soils enhanced by chloride deposition from marine sources, should be investigated as a possible partial explanation of the observed distributions. The results show that neither PCA nor total PCP (ΣPCP = PCP + PCA) should be used to approximate the concentrations of PCP; PCP and PCA must be determined and quantified separately to understand their occurrence and fate in the environment. The background work shows that the accumulation of airborne POPs in plants is a complex process. The variations in life cycles and physiological adaptations have to be taken into account when using plants to evaluate the concentrations of POPs in remote areas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.07.010DOI Listing
October 2017

Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil - A combined modelling and experimental approach.

Sci Total Environ 2016 Jun 5;554-555:203-10. Epub 2016 Mar 5.

Department of Thematic Studies - Environmental Change, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden.

Much of the total pool of chlorine (Cl) in soil consists of naturally produced organic chlorine (Clorg). The chlorination of bulk organic matter at substantial rates has been experimentally confirmed in various soil types. The subsequent fates of Clorg are important for ecosystem Cl cycling and residence times. As most previous research into dechlorination in soils has examined either single substances or specific groups of compounds, we lack information about overall bulk dechlorination rates. Here we assessed bulk organic matter chlorination and dechlorination rates in coniferous forest soil based on a radiotracer experiment conducted under various environmental conditions (additional water, labile organic matter, and ammonium nitrate). Experiment results were used to develop a model to estimate specific chlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl(-) transformed to Clorg per time unit) and specific dechlorination (i.e., fraction of Clorg transformed to Cl(-) per time unit) rates. The results indicate that chlorination and dechlorination occurred simultaneously under all tested environmental conditions. Specific chlorination rates ranged from 0.0005 to 0.01 d(-1) and were hampered by nitrogen fertilization but were otherwise similar among the treatments. Specific dechlorination rates were 0.01-0.03d(-1) and were similar among all treatments. This study finds that soil Clorg levels result from a dynamic equilibrium between the chlorination and rapid dechlorination of some Clorg compounds, while another Clorg pool is dechlorinated more slowly. Altogether, this study demonstrates a highly active Cl cycling in soils.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.02.208DOI Listing
June 2016

Experimental evidence of large changes in terrestrial chlorine cycling following altered tree species composition.

Environ Sci Technol 2015 Apr 1;49(8):4921-8. Epub 2015 Apr 1.

†Department of Thematic Studies-Environmental Change, Linköping University, SE-581 83, Linköping, Sweden.

Organochlorine molecules (Clorg) are surprisingly abundant in soils and frequently exceed chloride (Cl(-)) levels. Despite the widespread abundance of Clorg and the common ability of microorganisms to produce Clorg, we lack fundamental knowledge about how overall chlorine cycling is regulated in forested ecosystems. Here we present data from a long-term reforestation experiment where native forest was cleared and replaced with five different tree species. Our results show that the abundance and residence times of Cl(-) and Clorg after 30 years were highly dependent on which tree species were planted on the nearby plots. Average Cl(-) and Clorg content in soil humus were higher, at experimental plots with coniferous trees than in those with deciduous trees. Plots with Norway spruce had the highest net accumulation of Cl(-) and Clorg over the experiment period, and showed a 10 and 4 times higher Cl(-) and Clorg storage (kg ha(-1)) in the biomass, respectively, and 7 and 9 times higher storage of Cl(-) and Clorg in the soil humus layer, compared to plots with oak. The results can explain why local soil chlorine levels are frequently independent of atmospheric deposition, and provide opportunities for improved modeling of chlorine distribution and cycling in terrestrial ecosystems.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b00137DOI Listing
April 2015

Portable chamber system for measuring chloroform fluxes from terrestrial environments--methodological challenges.

Environ Sci Technol 2013 Dec 21;47(24):14298-305. Epub 2013 Nov 21.

University of British Columbia , Vancouver, Canada.

This study describes a system designed to measure chloroform flux from terrestrial systems, providing a reliable first assessment of the spatial variability of flux over an area. The study takes into account that the variability of ambient air concentrations is unknown. It includes quality assurance procedures, sensitivity assessments, and testing of materials used to ensure that the flux equation used to extrapolate from concentrations to fluxes is sound and that the system does not act as a sink or a source of chloroform. The results show that many materials and components commonly used in sampling systems designed for CO2, CH4, and N2O emit chloroform and other volatile chlorinated compounds (VOCls) and are thus unsuitable in systems designed for studies of such compounds. To handle the above-mentioned challenges, we designed a system with a non-steady-state chamber and a closed-loop air-circulation unit returning scrubbed air to the chamber. Based on empirical observations, the concentration increase during a deployment was assumed to be linear. Four samples were collected consecutively and a line was fitted to the measured concentrations. The slope of the fitted line and the y-axis intercept were input variables in the equation used to transform concentration change data to flux estimates. The soundness of the flux equation and the underlying assumptions were tested and found to be reliable by comparing modeled and measured concentrations. Fluxes of chloroform in a forest clear-cut on the east coast of Vancouver Island, BC, during the year were found to vary from -130 to 620 ng m(-2) h(-1). The study shows that the method can reliably detect differences of approximately 50 ng m(-2) h(-1) in chloroform fluxes. The statistical power of the method is still comparatively strong down to differences of 35 ng m(-2) h(-1), but for smaller differences, the results should be interpreted with caution.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es403062cDOI Listing
December 2013

Organic matter chlorination rates in different boreal soils: the role of soil organic matter content.

Environ Sci Technol 2012 Feb 17;46(3):1504-10. Epub 2012 Jan 17.

Department of Thematic Studies, Water and Environmental Studies, Linköping University, 58183 Linköping, Sweden.

Transformation of chloride (Cl(-)) to organic chlorine (Cl(org)) occurs naturally in soil but it is poorly understood how and why transformation rates vary among environments. There are still few measurements of chlorination rates in soils, even though formation of Cl(org) has been known for two decades. In the present study, we compare organic matter (OM) chlorination rates, measured by (36)Cl tracer experiments, in soils from eleven different locations (coniferous forest soils, pasture soils and agricultural soils) and discuss how various environmental factors effect chlorination. Chlorination rates were highest in the forest soils and strong correlations were seen with environmental variables such as soil OM content and Cl(-) concentration. Data presented support the hypothesis that OM levels give the framework for the soil chlorine cycling and that chlorination in more organic soils over time leads to a larger Cl(org) pool and in turn to a high internal supply of Cl(-) upon dechlorination. This provides unexpected indications that pore water Cl(-) levels may be controlled by supply from dechlorination processes and can explain why soil Cl(-) locally can be more closely related to soil OM content and the amount organically bound chlorine than to Cl(-) deposition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es203191rDOI Listing
February 2012

Mechanism of antibacterial activity of the white-rot fungus Hypholoma fasciculare colonizing wood.

Can J Microbiol 2010 May;56(5):380-8

Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Department of Microbial Ecology, Boterhoeksestraat 48, Heteren 6666 GA, Netherlands.

In a previous study it was shown that the number of wood-inhabiting bacteria was drastically reduced after colonization of beech (Fagus sylvatica) wood blocks by the white-rot fungus Hypholoma fasciculare, or sulfur tuft (Folman et al. 2008). Here we report on the mechanisms of this fungal-induced antibacterial activity. Hypholoma fasciculare was allowed to invade beech and pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood blocks that had been precolonized by microorganisms from forest soil. The changes in the number of bacteria, fungal biomass, and fungal-related wood properties were followed for 23 weeks. Colonization by the fungus resulted in a rapid and large reduction in the number of bacteria (colony-forming units), which was already apparent after 4 weeks of incubation. The reduction in the number of bacteria coincided with fungal-induced acidification in both beech and pine wood blocks. No evidence was found for the involvement of toxic secondary metabolites or reactive oxygen species in the reduction of the number of bacteria. Additional experiments showed that the dominant bacteria present in the wood blocks were not able to grow under the acidic conditions (pH 3.5) created by the fungus. Hence our research pointed at rapid acidification as the major factor causing reduction of wood-inhabiting bacteria upon colonization of wood by H. fasciculare.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/w10-023DOI Listing
May 2010

Temperature sensitivity indicates that chlorination of organic matter in forest soil is primarily biotic.

Environ Sci Technol 2009 May;43(10):3569-73

Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.

Old assumptions that chloride is inert and that most chlorinated organic matter in soils is anthropogenic have been challenged by findings of naturally formed organochlorines. Such natural chlorination has been recognized for several decades, but there are still very few measurements of chlorination rates or estimates of the quantitative importance of terrestrial chlorine transformations. While much is known about the formation of specific compounds, bulk chlorination remains poorly understood in terms of mechanisms and effects of environmental factors. We quantified bulk chlorination rates in coniferous forest soil using 36Cl-chloride in tracer experiments at different temperatures and with and without molecular oxygen (O2). Chlorination was enhanced by the presence of O2 and had a temperature optimum at 20 degrees C. Minimum rates were found at high temperatures (50 degrees C) or under anoxic conditions. The results indicate (1) that most of the chlorination between 4 and 40 degrees C was biotic and driven by O2 dependent enzymes, and (2) that there is also slower background chlorination occurring under anoxic conditions at 20 degrees C and under oxic conditions at 50 degrees C. Hence, while oxic and biotic chlorination clearly dominated, chlorination by other processes including possible abiotic reactions was also detected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es8035779DOI Listing
May 2009

Differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and articular chondrocytes: analysis of chondrogenic potential and expression pattern of differentiation-related transcription factors.

J Orthop Res 2007 Feb;25(2):152-63

Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a candidate for replacing chondrocytes in cell-based repair of cartilage lesions. However, it has not been clarified if these cells can acquire the hyaline phenotype, and whether chondrocytes and MSCs show the same expression patterns of critical control genes in development. In order to study this, articular chondrocytes and iliac crest derived MSCs were allowed to differentiate in pellet mass cultures. Gene expression of markers for the cartilage phenotype, helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factors, and chondrogenic transcription factors were analyzed by real-time PCR. Matrix production was assayed using biochemical analysis for hydroxyproline, glycosaminoglycans, and immunohistochemistry for collagen types I and II. Significantly decreased expression of collagen type I was accompanied by increased expression of collagen types IIA and IIB during differentiation of chondrocytes, indicating differentiation towards a hyaline phenotype. Chondrogenesis in MSCs on the other hand resulted in up-regulation of collagen types I, IIA, IIB, and X, demonstrating differentiation towards cartilage of a mixed phenotype. Expression of HES1 increased significantly during chondrogenesis in chondrocytes while expression in MSCs was maintained at a low level. The HLH gene HES5 on the other hand was only detected in chondrocytes. Expression of ID1 decreased significantly in chondrocytes while the opposite was seen in MSCs. These findings suggest that chondrocytes and MSCs differentiated and formed different subtypes of cartilage, the hyaline and a mixed cartilage phenotype, respectively. Differentially regulated HLH genes indicated the possibility for HLH proteins in regulating chondrogenic differentiation. This information is important to understand the potential use of MSCs in cartilage repair.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jor.20287DOI Listing
February 2007

Chloride retention and release in a boreal forest soil: effects of soil water residence time and nitrogen and chloride loads.

Environ Sci Technol 2006 May;40(9):2977-82

Department of Geology and Geochemistry, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.

The common assumption that chloride (Cl-) is conservative in soils and can be used as a groundwater tracer is currently being questioned, and an increasing number of studies indicate that Cl- can be retained in soils. We performed lysimeter experiments with soil from a coniferous forest in southeast Sweden to determine whether pore water residence time and nitrogen and Cl- loads affected Cl- retention. Over the first 42 days there was a net retention of Cl- with retention rates averaging 3.1 mg CI- m(-2) d(-1) (68% of the added Cl- retained over 42 days). Thereafter, a net release of Cl- at similar rates was observed for the remaining experimental period (85 d). Longer soil water residence time and higher Cl- load gave higher initial retention and subsequent release rates than shorter residence time and lower Cl- load did. Nitrogen load did not affect Cl transformation rates. This study indicates that simultaneous retention and release of Cl- can occur in soils, and that rates may be considerable relative to the load. The retention of Cl- observed was probably due to chlorination of soil organic matter or ion exchange. The cause of the shift between net retention and net release is unclear, but we hypothesize that the presence of O2 or the presence of microbially available organic matter regulates Cl- retention and release rates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es0523237DOI Listing
May 2006

Natural formation and degradation of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soil--challenges to understanding.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2005 Jul;12(4):233-44

The Swedish Institute for Climate Science and Policy Research, ITUF, Linköpings universitet, 601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.

Goal, Scope And Background: The anthropogenic environmental emissions of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines have been under scrutiny in recent years because the two compound groups are suspected to contribute to forest dieback and stratospheric ozone destruction, respectively. The two organochlorine groups are linked because the atmospheric photochemical oxidation of some volatile organochlorine compounds is one source of phytotoxic chloroacetic acids in the environment. Moreover, both groups are produced in higher amounts by natural chlorination of organic matter, e.g. by soil microorganisms, marine macroalgae and salt lake bacteria, and show similar metabolism pathways. Elucidating the origin and fate of these organohalogens is necessary to implement actions to counteract environmental problems caused by these compounds.

Main Features: While the anthropogenic sources of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines are relatively well-known and within human control, knowledge of relevant natural processes is scarce and fragmented. This article reviews current knowledge on natural formation and degradation processes of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soils, with particular emphasis on processes in the rhizosphere, and discusses future studies necessary to understand the role of forest soils in the formation and degradation of these compounds.

Results And Discussion: Reviewing the present knowledge of the natural formation and degradation processes of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soil has revealed gaps in knowledge regarding the actual mechanisms behind these processes. In particular, there remains insufficient quantification of reliable budgets and rates of formation and degradation of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soil (both biotic and abiotic processes) to evaluate the strength of forest ecosystems regarding the emission and uptake of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines, both on a regional scale and on a global scale.

Conclusion: It is concluded that the overall role of forest soil as a source and/or sink for chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines is still unclear; the available laboratory and field data reveal only bits of the puzzle. Detailed knowledge of the natural degradation and formation processes in forest soil is important to evaluate the strength of forest ecosystems for the emission and uptake of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines, both on a regional scale and on a global scale.

Recommendation And Perspective: As the natural formation and degradation processes of chloroacetic acids and volatile organochlorines in forest soil can be influenced by human activities, evaluation of the extent of this influence will help to identify what future actions are needed to reduce human influences and thus prevent further damage to the environment and to human health caused by these compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1065/espr2005.06.262DOI Listing
July 2005

Ultraviolet radiation affects emission of ozone-depleting substances by marine macroalgae: results from a laboratory incubation study.

Environ Sci Technol 2004 Dec;38(24):6605-9

The Swedish Institute for Climate Science and Policy Research, Department of Thematic Studies, Linköpings Universitet, 601 74 Norrköping, Sweden.

The depletion of stratospheric ozone due to the effects of ozone-depleting substances, such as volatile organohalogens, emitted into the atmosphere from industrial and natural sources has increased the amount of ultraviolet radiation reaching the earth's surface. Especially in the subpolar and polar regions, where stratospheric ozone destruction is the highest, individual organisms and whole ecosystems can be affected. In a laboratory study, several species of marine macroalgae occurring in the polar and northern temperate regions were exposed to elevated levels of ultraviolet radiation. Most of the macroalgae released significantly more chloroform, bromoform, dibromomethane, and methyl iodide-all volatile organohalogens. Calculating on the basis of the release of total chlorine, bromine, and iodine revealed that, except for two macroalgae emitting chlorine and one alga emitting iodine, exposure to ultraviolet radiation caused macroalgae to emit significantly more total chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Increasing levels of ultraviolet radiation due to possible further destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer as a result of ongoing global atmospheric warming may thus increase the future importance of marine macroalgae as a source for the global occurrence of reactive halogen-containing compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es049527sDOI Listing
December 2004