Publications by authors named "Teresa Mattiello"

9 Publications

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New Neuronal Subtypes With a "Pre-Pancreatic" Signature in the Sea Urchin .

Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2018 2;9:650. Epub 2018 Nov 2.

Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy.

Neurons and pancreatic endocrine cells have a common physiology and express a similar toolkit of transcription factors during development. To explain these common features, it has been hypothesized that pancreatic cells most likely co-opted a pre-existing gene regulatory program from ancestral neurons. To test this idea, we looked for neurons with a "pre-pancreatic" program in an early-branched deuterostome, the sea urchin. Only vertebrates have a proper pancreas, however, our lab previously found that cells with a pancreatic-like signature are localized within the sea urchin embryonic gut. We also found that the pancreatic transcription factors Xlox/Pdx1 and Brn1/2/4 co-localize in a sub-population of ectodermal cells. Here, we find that the ectodermal SpLox+ SpBrn1/2/4 cells are specified as and neuronal precursors that become the lateral ganglion and the apical organ neurons. Two of the SpLox+ SpBrn1/2/4 cells also express another pancreatic transcription factor, the LIM-homeodomain gene . Moreover, we find that SpLox neurons produce the neuropeptide SpANP2, and that SpLox regulates SpANP2 expression. Taken together, our data reveal that there is a subset of sea urchin larval neurons with a gene program that predated pancreatic cells. These findings suggest that pancreatic endocrine cells co-opted a regulatory signature from an ancestral neuron that was already present in an early-branched deuterostome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2018.00650DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6224346PMC
November 2018

Neuropeptidergic Systems in Pluteus Larvae of the Sea Urchin : Neurochemical Complexity in a "Simple" Nervous System.

Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) 2018 25;9:628. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Centre for Life's Origins and Evolution, Research Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

The nervous system of the free-living planktonic larvae of sea urchins is relatively "simple," but sufficiently complex to enable sensing of the environment and control of swimming and feeding behaviors. At the pluteus stage of development, the nervous system comprises a central ganglion of serotonergic neurons located in the apical organ and sensory and motor neurons associated with the ciliary band and the gut. Neuropeptides are key mediators of neuronal signaling in nervous systems but currently little is known about neuropeptidergic systems in sea urchin larvae. Analysis of the genome sequence of the sea urchin has enabled the identification of 38 genes encoding neuropeptide precursors (NP) in this species. Here we characterize for the first time the expression of nine of these NP genes in larvae, providing a basis for a functional understanding of the neurochemical organization of the larval nervous system. In order to accomplish this we used single and double hybridization, coupled with immunohistochemistry, to investigate NP gene expression in comparison with known markers (e.g., the neurotransmitter serotonin). Several sub-populations of cells that express one or more NP genes were identified, which are located in the apica organ, at the base of the arms, around the mouth, in the ciliary band and in the mid- and fore-gut. Furthermore, high levels of cell proliferation were observed in neurogenic territories, consistent with an increase in the number of neuropeptidergic cells at late larval stages. This study has revealed that the sea urchin larval nervous system is far more complex at a neurochemical level than was previously known. Our NP gene expression map provides the basis for future work, aimed at understanding the role of diverse neuropeptides in control of various aspects of embryonic and larval behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2018.00628DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6209648PMC
October 2018

The dynamic nitric oxide pattern in developing cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

Dev Dyn 2012 Feb 3;241(2):390-402. Epub 2012 Jan 3.

Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental Biology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, Naples, Italy.

Background: Nitric oxide (NO) is implied in many important biological processes in all metazoans from porifera to chordates. In the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis NO plays a key role in the defense system and neurotransmission.

Results: Here, we detected for the first time NO, NO synthase (NOS) and transcript levels during the development of S. officinalis. The spatial pattern of NO and NOS is very dynamic, it begins during organogenesis in ganglia and epithelial tissues, as well as in sensory cells. At later stages, NO and NOS appear in organs and/or structures, including Hoyle organ, gills and suckers. Temporal expression of NOS, followed by real-time PCR, changes during development reaching the maximum level of expression at stage 26.

Conclusions: Overall these data suggest the involvement of NO during cuttlefish development in different fundamental processes, such as differentiation of neural and nonneural structures, ciliary beating, sensory cell maintaining, and organ functioning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dvdy.23722DOI Listing
February 2012

Aspirin extrusion from human platelets through multidrug resistance protein-4-mediated transport: evidence of a reduced drug action in patients after coronary artery bypass grafting.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2011 Aug;58(7):752-61

Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Objectives: In this study we investigate: 1) the role of multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4), an organic anion unidirectional transporter, in modulating aspirin action on human platelet cyclooxygenase (COX)-1; and 2) whether the impairment of aspirin-COX-1 interaction, found in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients, could be dependent on MRP4-mediated transport.

Background: Platelets of CABG patients present a reduced sensitivity to aspirin despite in vivo and in vitro drug treatment. Aspirin is an organic anion and could be a substrate for MRP4.

Methods: Intracellular aspirin concentration and drug COX-1 activity, measured by thrombin-induced thromboxane B2 (TxB2) production, were evaluated in platelets obtained from healthy volunteers (HV) and hematopoietic-progenitor cell cultures reducing or not reducing MRP4-mediated transport. Platelet MRP4 expression was evaluated, in platelets from HV and CABG patients, by dot-blot or by immunogold-electromicrographs or immunofluorescence-microscopy analysis.

Results: Inhibition of MRP4-mediated transport by dipyridamole or Mk-571 increases aspirin entrapment and its in vitro effect on COX-1 activity (142.7 ± 34.6 pg/10(8) cells vs. 343.7 ± 169.3 pg/10⁸ cells TxB2-production). Platelets derived from megakaryocytes transfected with MRP4 small interfering ribonucleic acid have a higher aspirin entrapment and drug COX-1 activity. Platelets from CABG patients showed a high expression of MRP4 whose in vitro inhibition enhanced aspirin effect on COX-1 (349 ± 141 pg/10⁸ cells vs. 1,670 ± 646 pg/10⁸ cells TxB2-production).

Conclusions: Aspirin is a substrate for MRP4 and can be extruded from platelet through its transportation. Aspirin effect on COX-1 is little-related to MRP4-mediated aspirin transport in HV, but in CABG patients with MRP4 over-expression, its pharmacological inhibition enhances aspirin action in an efficient way.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2011.03.049DOI Listing
August 2011

Nitric oxide mediates the glutamate-dependent pathway for neurotransmission in Sepia officinalis chromatophore organs.

J Biol Chem 2010 Jul 1;285(31):24154-63. Epub 2010 Jun 1.

Laboratories of Cellular and Developmental Biology, Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn, 80121 Naples, Italy.

Chromatophore organs are complex and unique structures responsible for the variety of body coloration patterns used by cephalopods to communicate and camouflage. They are formed by a pigment-containing cytoelastic sacculus, surrounded by muscle fibers directly innervated from the brain. Muscle contraction and relaxation are responsible for expansion and retraction of the pigment-containing cell. Their functioning depends on glutamate and Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH(2)-related peptides, which induce fast and slow cell expansion, respectively, and 5-hydroxytryptamine, which induces retraction. Apart from these three substances and acetylcholine, which acts presynaptically, no other neuroactive compounds have so far been found to be involved in the neuroregulation of chromatophore physiology, and the detailed signaling mechanisms are still little understood. Herein, we disclose the role of nitric oxide (NO) as mediator in one of the signaling pathways by which glutamate activates body patterning. NO and nitric-oxide synthase have been detected in pigment and muscle fibers of embryo, juvenile, and adult chromatophore organs from Sepia officinalis. NO-mediated Sepia chromatophore expansion operates at slower rate than glutamate and involves cGMP, cyclic ADP-ribose, and ryanodine receptor activation. These results demonstrate for the first time that NO is an important messenger in the long term maintenance of the body coloration patterns in Sepia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M109.083428DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2911315PMC
July 2010

Effects of pomegranate juice and extract polyphenols on platelet function.

J Med Food 2009 Apr;12(2):334-9

Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Several studies have shown that polyphenols reduce cardiovascular accidents in high-risk patients; in particular, the inhibition of platelet function may be responsible for part of this benefit. This research studied the antiplatelet effect of Wonderful variety pomegranate (Punica granatum) products, which contain primarily hydrolyzed tannins such as ellagitannins. We have investigated in vitro the effects of treatment with either pomegranate juice (PJ) or the polyphenol-rich extract from pomegranate fruit (POMx) on platelet aggregation, calcium mobilization, thromboxane A(2) production, and hydrogen peroxide formation, induced by collagen and arachidonic acid. PJ and POMx reduce all the platelet responses studied. POMx showed a stronger action in reducing platelet activation; moreover, POMx is active at the concentration that it is possible to obtain after polyphenol-rich food intake (2 microM). These results demonstrated that the cardiovascular health benefits of pomegranate may in part be related to the ability of polyphenols to inhibit platelet function. In fact, PJ and pomegranate extract have similar effects at concentrations expected for normal intake.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2007.0640DOI Listing
April 2009

COX-1 sensitivity and thromboxane A2 production in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients under chronic aspirin treatment.

Eur Heart J 2009 May 3;30(10):1279-86. Epub 2009 Apr 3.

Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome, Italy.

Aims: Although aspirin treatment is useful in reducing ischaemic events in diabetic patients, recent studies suggest that it is less effective when compared with non-diabetics (ND). We sought to evaluate COX-1 sensitivity and thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) production in type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients under chronic aspirin treatment, and also evaluate the association between thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) production and markers of inflammation and metabolic control, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fasting blood glucose, and haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c).

Methods And Results: Agonist-induced platelet aggregation (PA) and TxB(2), a stable metabolite of TxA(2), production, serum TxB(2), and platelet COX-1 and COX-2 expression were studied in T2DM patients, T1DM patients, and high-risk ND subjects, all receiving a low dose of aspirin. TxB(2) formation was studied in platelets treated in vitro with aspirin alone or with a COX-2 inhibitor (NS-398). PA, collagen-induced TxB(2) production, and serum TxB(2) were higher in T1DM and T2DM patients than in ND subjects. TxB(2) production was reduced in diabetic patients by in vitro treatment with aspirin. COX-2 was expressed in all diabetic patients but only in 46% of ND patients. In diabetic patients significant correlations were observed between TxB(2) production and both fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c.

Conclusion: COX-1 sensitivity and TxB(2) production is similarly reduced in both T1DM and T2DM patients under chronic aspirin treatment. The association between TxB(2) production and either fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c levels suggests that in diabetic patients hyperglycaemia is a determinant of the reduced platelet sensitivity to aspirin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehp097DOI Listing
May 2009