Publications by authors named "Teresa Baptista-Fernandes"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Imported Malaria in Portugal: Prevalence of Polymorphisms in the Anti-Malarial Drug Resistance Genes and .

Microorganisms 2021 Sep 28;9(10). Epub 2021 Sep 28.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa (IHMT-NOVA), Rua da Junqueira 100, 1349-008 Lisboa, Portugal.

Malaria is one of the 'big three' killer infectious diseases, alongside tuberculosis and HIV. In non-endemic areas, malaria may occur in travelers who have recently been to or visited endemic regions. The number of imported malaria cases in Portugal has increased in recent years, mostly due to the close relationship with the community of Portuguese language countries. Samples were collected from malaria-infected patients attending Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Ocidental (CHLO) or the outpatient clinic of Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical (IHMT-NOVA) between March 2014 and May 2021. Molecular characterization of and genes was performed. We analyzed 232 imported malaria cases. The majority (68.53%) of the patients came from Angola and only three patients travelled to a non-African country; one to Brazil and two to Indonesia. was diagnosed in 81.47% of the cases, in 7.33%, 6.47% and 1.72% carried . No mutations were detected in . Regarding , the wild-type haplotype (N86/Y184/D1246) was also the most prevalent (64.71%) and N86/184F/D1246 was detected in 26.47% of the cases. The typical imported malaria case was middle-aged male, traveling from Angola, infected with carrying wild type and . Our study highlights the need for constant surveillance of malaria parasites imported into Portugal as an important pillar of public health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9102045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8538333PMC
September 2021

Artemether-lumefantrine treatment failure of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in travellers coming from Angola and Mozambique.

Int J Infect Dis 2021 Sep 7;110:151-154. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Global Health and Tropical Medicine, GHTM, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, IHMT, Universidade NOVA de Lisboa, UNL, Portugal. Electronic address:

The failure of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) in malaria patients returning from endemic regions may be driven by parasite resistance to this treatment. ACT is used globally as the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, artemisinin-resistant strains of P. falciparum have emerged and spread across Southeast Asia, with the risk of reaching high malaria burden regions in Africa and elsewhere. Here, we report on two malaria imported cases from Africa with possible parasite resistance to the ACT artemether-lumefantrine (AL). Case presentation: Two middle-aged males returning from Angola and Mozambique developed malaria symptoms in Portugal, where they were diagnosed and received treatment with AL as hospital inpatients. After apparent cure and discharge from hospital, these individuals returned to hospital showing signs of late clinical failure. Molecular analysis was performed across a number of drug resistance associated genes. No evidence of pfk13-mediated artemisinin resistance was found. Both subjects had complete parasite clearance after treatment with non-ACT antimalarials. Conclusion: Our case-studies highlights the need for close monitoring of signs of unsatisfactory antimalarial efficacy among AL treated patients and the possible implication of other genes or mutations in the parasite response to ACTs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2021.07.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8461077PMC
September 2021

Human gastric hyperinfection by Anisakis simplex: A severe and unusual presentation and a brief review.

Int J Infect Dis 2017 Nov 4;64:38-41. Epub 2017 Sep 4.

Laboratório de Microbiologia Clínica e Biologia Molecular, Serviço de Patologia Clínica, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Hospital Egas Moniz, Rua da Junqueira 126, 1349-019 Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address:

Anisakiasis is an emerging marine food-borne zoonosis resulting from the accidental ingestion of Anisakis larvae, through the consumption of raw or undercooked infected seafood products. The first case of human gastric hyperinfection by Anisakis simplex with an unusual and severe presentation, occurring in a Portuguese woman, is described in this article. Over 140 anisakid larvae were removed by gastroscopy. Massive infection is uncommon in areas where the consumption of raw fish is not part of the traditional diet, as is the case in Portugal. The increased consumption of raw seafood products is considered a health determinant in the rise in cases of anisakiasis. However, clinicians should be aware of the emergence of these infections, not only because of the new dietary habits of the population, but also because of the high prevalence of Anisakis larvae in the different fish species usually consumed by the population, collected on the Portuguese coast.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2017.08.012DOI Listing
November 2017

Dirofilariasis by Dirofilaria repens: an imported case and a brief review.

Parasitol Int 2015 Oct 11;64(5):261-3. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

Laboratório de Microbiologia Clínica e Biologia Molecular, Serviço de Patologia Clínica, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Ocidental, Hospital Egas Moniz, Rua da Junqueira no 126, 1349-019 Lisboa, Portugal. Electronic address:

Human infections caused by Dirofilaria repens, a cosmopolitan zoonotic parasitosis endemic in Southern and Eastern Europe and Asia still is an underdiagnosed infection due to parasite identification difficulties. Here, we report the first human case of subcutaneous dirofilariasis by D. repens diagnosed in Portugal. This was probably an imported case from India, as judged by epidemiological and clinical data. With this presentation we aim to alert clinicians for the emergence of vector-borne zoonoses associated with global warming and international travel. This case showed that differential diagnosis of D. repens in subcutaneous nodules is needed, in order to avoid further complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parint.2015.03.001DOI Listing
October 2015

Giardia duodenalis and soil-transmitted helminths infections in children in São Tomé and Príncipe: do we think Giardia when addressing parasite control?

J Trop Pediatr 2015 Apr 20;61(2):106-12. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

Unidade de Clínica Tropical e Centro de Malária e Doenças Tropicais-LA, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1349-008 Lisboa, Portugal.

Giardia duodenalis prevalence is commonly as high as soil-transmitted helminths (STH), nevertheless is not considered for large-scale chemotherapy through mass drug administration (MDA) due to its short incubation period and frequent reinfections, its control being associated to improving access to water and sanitation. A study enrolling 444 children attending preschools was conducted in May 2011 during a deworming campaign. Faecal samples were obtained and analysed through microscopy of wet mounting and after Kato-Katz and formol-ether concentration techniques. The majority of children were infected with at least one pathogenic parasite (86.7%, 385 of 444). Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura (56.3%, 250 of 444 and 52.5%, 233 of 444, respectively) were the most frequent parasites followed by G. duodenalis infecting 41.7% (185 of 444) of the children. The present work aimed at obtaining updated information concerning intestinal parasite infections in children attending preschools in São Tomé and Príncipe and to contribute for the adequate management of the enteric infections.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmu078DOI Listing
April 2015

Intra-specific variability of virulence in Leishmania infantum zymodeme MON-1 strains.

Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis 2007 Jan 15;30(1):41-53. Epub 2006 Nov 15.

Unidade de Leishmanioses, Centro de Malária e outras Doenças Tropicais, Instituto de Higiene e Medicina Tropical (IHMT), Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Rua da Junqueira 96, 1349-008 Lisboa, Portugal.

This study aims to characterize the intra-specific variability of virulence in Leishmania infantum zymodeme MON-1 strains isolated from dogs and immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients through the evaluation of growth pattern, infective ability and immunopathogenicity. Two of the strains, classified as the most virulent, presented higher levels of macrophage infection, increased promastigote replication in culture medium and as well as amastigote multiplication within macrophages. These strains caused the most pathogenic infection inducing splenomegalia and maximum parasite loads in spleen and liver of BALB/c mice. The other strains exhibited either low virulence, with reduced infective capability and low replication levels, or an intermediate virulent phenotype showing mixed features similar to low and high virulent phenotypes. A correlation between the infectivity, growth dynamics and pathogenicity of each strain and the humoral and cellular immune response was demonstrated. Strains with accentuated virulent phenotype induced higher levels of anti-Leishmania IgG1 antibodies and TGF-beta but reduced production of IFN-gamma. Virulence phenotype seems to be a characteristic of each strain regardless of the host (dog or human) from which it was firstly isolated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cimid.2006.10.001DOI Listing
January 2007
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