Publications by authors named "Teodor Danaila"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparison of clinical outcomes and accuracy of electrode placement between robot-assisted and conventional deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus: a single-center study.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2021 Mar 2. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Service de Neurologie C, Centre Expert Parkinson, Hôpital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical Pierre Wertheimer, Hospices Civils de Lyon, 69003, Lyon, France.

Background: Several surgical methods are used for deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study aimed to compare clinical outcomes and electrode placement accuracy after robot-assisted (RAS) versus frame-based stereotactic (FSS) STN DBS in Parkinson's disease.

Methods: In this single-center open-label study, we prospectively collected data from 48 consecutive PD patients who underwent RAS (Neuromate®; n = 20) or FSS (n = 28) STN DBS with the same MRI-based STN targeting between October 2016 and December 2018 in the university neurological hospital of Lyon, France. Clinical variables were assessed before and 1 year after surgery. The number of electrode contacts within the STN was determined by merging post-operative CT and pre-operative MRI using Brainlab® GUIDE™XT software.

Results: One year after surgery, the improvement of motor manifestations (p = 0.18), motor complications (p = 0.80), and quality of life (p= 0.30) and the reduction of dopaminergic treatment (p = 0.94) and the rate of complications (p = 0.99) were similar in the two groups. Surgery duration was longer in the RAS group (p = 0.0001). There was no difference in the number of electrode contacts within the STN.

Conclusion: This study demonstrates that RAS and FSS STN DBS for PD provide similar clinical outcomes and accuracy of electrode placement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-021-04790-7DOI Listing
March 2021

Changes in Prefrontal Cortical Activity During Walking and Cognitive Functions Among Patients With Parkinson's Disease.

Front Neurol 2020 10;11:601686. Epub 2020 Dec 10.

TS2-LESCOT, Univ Gustave Eiffel, IFSTTAR, Univ Lyon, Lyon, France.

Walking becomes more and more degraded as Parkinson's Disease (PD) progresses. Previous research examined factors contributing to this deterioration. Among them, changes in brain cortical activity during walking have been less studied in this clinical population. This study aimed to: (1) investigate changes in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation during usual walking and dual-task walking conditions in patients with PD; (2) examine the association between cortical activity and behavioral/cognitive outcomes; and (3) explore which factors best predict increased activation of the DLPFC during usual walking. Eighteen patients with early stage PD and 18 controls performed 4 conditions: (1) standing while subtracting, (2) usual walking, (3) walking while counting forward, and (4) walking while subtracting. Cortical activity in DLPFC, assessed by changes in oxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbO) and deoxy-hemoglobin (ΔHbR), was measured using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Gait performance was recorded using wearables sensors. Cognition was also assessed using neuropsychological tests, including the Trail Making Test (TMT). DLPFC activity was higher in patients compared to controls during both usual walking and walking while subtracting conditions. Patients had impaired walking performance compared to controls only during walking while subtracting task. Moderate-to-strong correlations between ΔHbO and coefficients of variation of all gait parameters were found for usual walking and during walking while counting forward conditions. Part-B of TMT predicted 21% of the variance of ΔHbO during usual walking after adjustment for group status. The increased DLPFC activity in patients during usual walking suggests a potential compensation for executive deficits. Understanding changes in DLPFC activity during walking may have implications for rehabilitation of gait in patients with PD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2020.601686DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7758480PMC
December 2020

Nucleus Basalis of Meynert Stimulation for Lewy Body Dementia: A Phase I Randomized Clinical Trial.

Neurology 2021 02 16;96(5):e684-e697. Epub 2020 Nov 16.

From the Departments of Neurology (D.M., D.W., R.L., D.H.), Neurophysiology (J.B., M.-L.W.), and Neurosurgery (S.D.), Rouen University Hospital and University of Rouen; INSERM U1239 (D.M.), Laboratory of Neuronal and Neuroendocrine Differentiation and Communication, Mont-Saint-Aignan; Department of Neurology C (T.D., S.T.), Hopital Neurologique Pierre Wertheimer, University of Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Faculté de Médecine Lyon Sud Charles Mérieux; Department of Neurology (L.D., K.D.), Lille University Hospital, INSERM 1171; Department of Neurology (J.-L.H.), CIC-INSERM 1402, CHU de Poitiers; Université de Poitiers (J.-L.H.); Department of Neurology (O.G., P.K.), Amiens University Hospital; Department of Neurology (O.M.), Caen University Hospital; Department of Biostatistics (A.G.), Rouen University Hospital; Department of Nuclear Medicine (M.C., P.V.), Henri Becquerel Cancer Center and Rouen University Hospital; and QuantIF-LITIS [EA (Equipe d'Accueil) 4108-FR CNRS 3638] (M.C., P.V.), Faculty of Medicine, University of Rouen, France.

Objectives: Nucleus basalis of Meynert deep brain stimulation (NBM-DBS) has been proposed for patients with dementia. Here, we aim to assess the safety and effects of NBM-DBS in patients with Lewy body dementia (LBD), in a randomized, double-blind, crossover clinical trial.

Methods: Six patients with mild to moderate LBD (mean [SD] age, 62.2 [7.8] years) were included, operated on for bilateral NBM-DBS, and assigned to receive either active or sham NBM-DBS followed by the opposite condition for 3 months. The primary outcome was the difference in the total free recalls of the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT) between active and sham NBM-DBS. Secondary outcomes were assessments of the safety and effects of NBM-DBS on cognition, motor disability, sleep, and PET imaging.

Results: There was no significant difference in the FCSRT score with active vs sham NBM-DBS. The surgical procedures were well tolerated in all patients, but we observed significant decreases in Stroop and Benton scores after electrode implantation. We observed no significant difference in other scales between active and sham NBM-DBS. With active NBM-DBS relative to baseline, phonemic fluency and motor disability significantly decreased. Lastly, the superior lingual gyrus metabolic activity significantly increased with active NBM-DBS.

Conclusions: NBM-DBS does not appear to be totally safe for patients with LBD with no evidence of cognitive benefit.

Clinicaltrialsgov Identifier: NCT01340001.

Classification Of Evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that, for patients with LBD operated on for bilateral NBM-DBS, active NBM-DBS stimulation compared to sham stimulation did not significantly change selective recall scores.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000011227DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7884989PMC
February 2021

Personality Dimensions Are Associated with Quality of Life in Fluctuating Parkinson's Disease Patients (PSYCHO-STIM).

J Parkinsons Dis 2020 ;10(3):1057-1066

ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, University of Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, Toulouse, France.

Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) negatively affects patients' Quality of Life (QoL) which depends on both objective criteria such as physical health and subjective ones such as worries and norms according to personal believes. Therefore, QoL could be also associated to personality dimensions in chronic neurological diseases such as PD.

Objective: Our objective was thus to study the potential association between personality dimensions and QoL in PD patients with motor fluctuations before Deep Brain Stimulation of the Sub-Thalamic Nucleus (DBS-STN).

Methods: Data were obtained from the French multicentric cohort study Predi-Stim. All PD patients awaiting DBS-STN and responding to the inclusion criteria at the time of the study were included. All participants answered the "Temperament and Character Inventory" (TCI) and the PDQ-39 before surgery. Analyses were made using adjusted univariate generalized linear regression models to evaluate a potential association between TCI dimensions and PDQ-39 scores.

Results: Three hundred thirty-three consecutive patients were included. The temperament Harm Avoidance was negatively associated with QoL (p = 1e-4, R2= 0.33), whereas the character Self-Directedness was positively associated with mental component of QoL (p = 2e-4, R2= 0.33) in PD patients with motor fluctuations awaiting DBS-STN.

Conclusions: PD patients with motor fluctuations, with lower Harm Avoidance and higher Self-Directedness scores have the best QoL mainly at an emotional and social level. Therapeutic education of these PD patients focusing on their personal resources may thus be important to improve their well-being.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/JPD-191903DOI Listing
January 2020

A novel heterozygous ANO3 mutation responsible for myoclonic dystonia.

J Neurol Sci 2019 Aug 13;403:65-66. Epub 2019 Jun 13.

Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Neurologique Pierre Wertheimer, Service de Neurologie C, 69000 Lyon, France; Université de Lyon, Lyon 1 University, Lyon, F-69373; Centre de Neurosciences Cognitives de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5229, Bron F-69500, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2019.06.014DOI Listing
August 2019

Descriptive analysis of the French NS-Park registry: Towards a nation-wide Parkinson's disease cohort?

Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2019 07 25;64:226-234. Epub 2019 Apr 25.

Sorbonne Université, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Institut du Cerveau et de la Moelle épinière, ICM, Inserm U 1127, CNRS UMR 7225, Department of Neurology, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, F-75013, Paris, France; Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology, Collège de France, INSERM U1050, CNRS UMR7241, Labex Memolife, Paris Sciences et Lettres, Paris, France; AP-HP, Department of Neurology, Hôpital Avicenne, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Paris - Seine Saint Denis, Bobigny, France. Electronic address:

Introduction: Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's. The French clinical research network for PD (NS-Park) has created a national patient registry to i)report medical activity of Parkinson Expert Centers (PECs) to the Ministry of Health, ii)facilitate PD patients pre-screening for clinical trials, iii) provide a source for pharmaco-epidemiology studies.

Objective: Assess the French Parkinsonian population at a nation-wide level and discover new clinical characteristics.

Methods: In this feasibility study, PECs prospectively collected clinical data in a standardized manner. The population main clinical characteristics are described, focusing on motor and non-motor symptoms and treatments, assessing its representativeness. By using an unbiased clustering with multiple correspondence analysis (MCA), we also investigate potential relationships between multiple variables like symptoms and treatments, as clues for future studies.

Results: Between 2012 and 2016, among 11,157 included parkinsonian syndromes, 9454 (85%) had PD. MCA identified various profiles depending on disease duration. Occurrences of motor complications, axial signs, cognitive disorders and Levodopa use increase over time. Neurovegetative symptoms, psychiatric disorders, sleep disturbances and impulse control disorders (ICDs) seem stable over time. As expected, ICDs were associated to dopaminergic agonist use but other associations, such as ICDs and sleep disturbances for instance, or anxiety and depression, were found.

Conclusions: Our results report one of the biggest PD registries ever reported and demonstrate the feasibility of implementing a nation-wide registry of PD patients in France, a potent tool for future longitudinal studies and clinical trials' population selection, and for pharmaco-epidemiology and cost-effectiveness studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2019.04.012DOI Listing
July 2019

[Parkinson's disease: from the description of the disease to its surgical treatment].

Rev Prat 2018 May;68(5):574-578

Université de Lyon, institut des sciences cognitives Marc-Jeannerod, CNRS, UMR 5229, Bron, France.

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May 2018

[Parkinson's disease treatment: from honey moon to motor fluctuations].

Rev Prat 2018 May;68(5):502-507

Faculté de médecine Lyon-Sud-Charles- Mérieux, université Lyon-1, université de Lyon, Lyon, France.

Parkinson's disease treatment: from honey moon to motor fluctuations. The treatment of Parkinson's disease remains symptomatic but allows, for many years, a good control of motor and non-motor signs. This treatment is complex and has to deal with very heterogeneous motor and non-motor presentation. Initial treatment is started once disability occurs and is mainly based either on levodopa or dopamine agonists. When motor fluctuations start, the principle of treatment is to optimize levodopa intake and combine various drugs depending on the clinical presentation. Third line strategies of treatment such as pumps or deep brain stimulation may be proposed at this stage. Later on, when doparesistant signs appear, treatment has often to be simplified, cognitive decline to be taken in charge and physiotherapy is crucial even if physical exercise is of great importance whatever the stage of the disease. Finally, non-motor manifestations have to be carefully addressed throughout the course of the disease because their impact on quality of life is sometimes greater than the one of motor signs.
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May 2018

Age and time course of long-term motor and nonmotor complications in Parkinson disease.

Neurology 2019 01 12;92(2):e148-e160. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

From Université Lyon (S.P., T.D., C.L., E.M., E.B., S.T.), Institut des Sciences Cognitives-Marc Jeannerod, CNRS, UMR 5229, Bron; Hospices Civils de Lyon (S.P., T.D., C.C., C.L., E.M., H.M., E.B., S.T.), Hôpital Neurologique Pierre Wertheimer, Service de Neurologie C, Centre Expert Parkinson, Bron; Université Lyon (C.L., E.B., D.M.-B., S.T.), Faculté de Médecine Lyon Sud Charles Mérieux, Oullins; Hospices Civils de Lyon (D.M.-B.), Service de Biostatistique, Lyon; and Université Lyon (D.M.-B.), Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Évolutive, CNRS, UMR 5558, Pierre Benite, France.

Objective: To determine the time course of hazard for motor and nonmotor milestones of Parkinson disease (PD) in the long term and to investigate whether risk scales nonlinearly with time is instrumental in identifying changes in pathological processes and evaluating disease-modifying therapies in PD.

Methods: Outpatients with PD at the Lyon University Movement Disorders Center were evaluated for 7 clinical milestones in this retrospective cohort study, encompassing 4 domains of PD progression: (1) motor (motor fluctuations, dyskinesias); (2) axial (postural instability and falls, freezing of gait); (3) neuropsychiatric (impulse control disorders, hallucinations); and (4) cognitive (dementia) complications. For each complication, we estimated the outcome-specific hazard using parsimonious smooth parametric Poisson regression models allowing for nonlinear scaling over disease duration, age at diagnosis, current age, and their interaction.

Results: A total of 1,232 patients with PD experienced 1,527 disease-related complications in up to 12 years of follow-up. Specific to each complication, hazard rates increased dramatically starting from diagnosis and were highest for motor fluctuations and lowest for dementia up to 6 years after diagnosis in patients aged 65 years at diagnosis. Nonlinear patterns indicated dramatic changes in the course of PD after 5 years and predicted more severe axial prognosis after 70 years and for motor fluctuations, dyskinesias, and impulse control disorders before 60 years at diagnosis.

Conclusion: Time course of motor and nonmotor milestones in PD is determined by disease duration and age at diagnosis in nonlinear patterns and their interaction. This indicates disease- and age-specific thresholds across the multiple neurodegenerative processes accumulating in PD at different paces.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000006737DOI Listing
January 2019

Toe dystonia in Parkinson's disease: Impact of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation.

J Neurol Sci 2018 09 12;392:65-68. Epub 2018 Jul 12.

Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod, UMR 5229, CNRS, Bron, France; Service de Neurologie C, Centre Expert Parkinson, Hôpital Neurologique Pierre, Wertheimer, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France; Faculté de médecine Lyon Sud Charles Mérieux, Université Lyon 1, Univ Lyon, Lyon, France.

Background: Off state toe dystonia (TD) is a symptom frequently encountered in Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known about its evolution after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS).

Objective: To analyze the prevalence and the evolution of TD in PD patients candidate to STN-DBS.

Methods: Individual data of consecutive 130 PD patients who underwent STN-DBS between 2010 and 2015 were collected.

Results: Data were successfully collected in 95 patients. TD affect 45.3% of the patients in our cohort. TD was present in 32.7% of patients before surgery and was alleviated by STN-DBS in 48% of the cases. Motor improvement provided by STN-DBS, levodopa-equivalent treatment diminution after surgery, disease duration or age at the time of surgery were not predictive of TD evolution. A younger age at PD diagnosis was significantly associated with TD resolution.

Conclusion: STN-DBS is partially efficient for TD but its evolution seems independent of significant predictive factors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2018.07.004DOI Listing
September 2018

Typical features of Parkinson disease and diagnostic challenges with microdeletion 22q11.2.

Neurology 2018 06 11;90(23):e2059-e2067. Epub 2018 May 11.

From The Dalglish Family 22q Clinic for Adults and Department of Psychiatry (E.B., A.M.F., A.S.B.), Toronto General Research Institute (A.S.B.), and Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine (A.S.B.), University Health Network, Toronto, Canada; De Hartekamp Groep (E.B.), Centre for People with Intellectual Disability, Haarlem; Department of Nuclear Medicine (E.B., J.B.), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Clinical Genetics Research Program and Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute (N.J.B., A.M.F., A.S.B.), Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto; Institute of Medical Science (N.J.B., M.M., A.E.L., A.S.B.), Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine (C.M., M.M., A.E.L.), and Department of Psychiatry (A.S.B.), University of Toronto; Deer Lodge Movement Disorders Centre (S.U.); Section of Neurology (S.U.), Division of Internal Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg; Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Centre and the Edmond J. Safra Program in Parkinson's Disease Research (C.M., A.E.L.), Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Molecular Neuroscience (K.Y.M., N.W.W.), UCL Institute of Neurology, London, UK; Department of Neurology (S.K.), Kansai Medical University, Osaka, Japan; Department of Neurology (M.J.B.), University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville; Medical Genetics Unit (P.P.), Perugia University Hospital, Italy; Department of Neurology (B.D.B.), University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora; Neurology Section (B.D.B.), VA Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver; Cognitive & Movement Disorders Clinic and Hurvitz Brain Sciences Research Program (M.M.), Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada; Departments of Clinical Neurosciences (Movement Disorders) (B.D.) and Genetics (Neurogenetics) (K.N.), Timone University Hospital (AP-HM), Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur; Aix-Marseille University (B.D., K.N.), Marseille; Department of Genetics (Neurogenetics) (P.C., A.J.), Pitié-Salpêtrière University Hospital; Sorbonne University (P.C., A.J.), Paris; Department of Neurosciences (Movement Disorders) (E.M.), Lille University Hospital; Lille University (E.M.); Department of Neurology (Movement Disorders) (T.D.), Pierre Wertheimer University Hospital, Lyon; Marc Jeannerod Center for Cognitive Neurosciences (T.D.), Lyon-1 University; Department of Neurology (Movement Disorders) and Clinical Investigation Center (Clinical and Experimental Neurosciences) (O.C.), Poitiers University Hospital; Department of Neurology (Movement Disorders) (S.D.), Rennes University Hospital; Rennes-1 University (S.D.); Department of Clinical Neurosciences (Movement Disorders) (M.B.), Nice University Hospital, France; Department of Psychiatry (A.M.F.), Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands; Center for Human Genetics (E.V., A.S., A.V.), University Hospital Leuven; Department of Human Genetics (A.S.), KU Leuven, Belgium; Department of Neurology (A.P.), University of Munich, Germany; Scientific and Technological Coordination Unit of the ANLIS Directorate (C.P.), National Administration of Laboratories and Institutes of Health, Argentina; Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases (T.G.), Center of Neurology and Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen; German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) (T.G.); Department of Neurology (K.C.), AZ Turnhout, Antwerp, Belgium; Neurology Unit and Stroke Center (F.B.), Hôpital Foch, Suresnes, France; Movement Disorder Division (K.M.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD; and Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences (N.M.W.), MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff University, UK.

Objective: To delineate the natural history, diagnosis, and treatment response of Parkinson disease (PD) in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS), and to determine if these patients differ from those with idiopathic PD.

Methods: In this international observational study, we characterized the clinical and neuroimaging features of 45 individuals with 22q11.2DS and PD (mean follow-up 7.5 ± 4.1 years).

Results: 22q11.2DS PD had a typical male excess (32 male, 71.1%), presentation and progression of hallmark motor symptoms, reduced striatal dopamine transporter binding with molecular imaging, and initial positive response to levodopa (93.3%). Mean age at motor symptom onset was relatively young (39.5 ± 8.5 years); 71.4% of cases had early-onset PD (<45 years). Despite having a similar age at onset, the diagnosis of PD was delayed in patients with a history of antipsychotic treatment compared with antipsychotic-naive patients (median 5 vs 1 year, = 0.001). Preexisting psychotic disorders (24.5%) and mood or anxiety disorders (31.1%) were common, as were early dystonia (19.4%) and a history of seizures (33.3%).

Conclusions: Major clinical characteristics and response to standard treatments appear comparable in 22q11.2DS-associated PD to those in idiopathic PD, although the average age at onset is earlier. Importantly, treatment of preexisting psychotic illness may delay diagnosis of PD in 22q11.DS patients. An index of suspicion and vigilance for complex comorbidity may assist in identifying patients to prioritize for genetic testing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000005660DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5993183PMC
June 2018

Imagerie cérébrale dans les syndromes parkinsoniens.

Presse Med 2017 Mar 28;46(2 Pt 1):202-209. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

Université de Lyon, université Claude-Bernard Lyon I, faculté de médecine Lyon Sud Charles-Mérieux, Lyon, France; Hospices civils de Lyon, hôpital neurologique Pierre-Wertheimer, service de neurologie C, centre expert parkinson, Lyon, France; CNRS, centre de neurosciences cognitives, UMR 5229, Bron, France. Electronic address:

Role of brain imaging for Parkinsonism T brain MRI is normal in Pakinson's disease. Brain MRI is useless when clinical presentation is typical of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Brain MRI is the exam of choice for differentiating idiopathic Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism. DATscan* confirms or rules out dopaminergic degeneration but does not separate idiopathic Parkinson's disease from Parkinson "plus" syndromes. FDG PET is helpful to separate idiopathic Parkinson's disease from Parkinson "plus" syndromes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lpm.2016.09.025DOI Listing
March 2017

High incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

J Neurol 2016 Dec 13;263(12):2416-2418. Epub 2016 Sep 13.

Service de Neurologie C, Hôpital Neurologique Pierre Wertheimer, Hospices Civils de Lyon, 69000, Lyon, France.

We observed several cases of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) revealed after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). 115 consecutive PD patients who underwent STN-DBS between 2010 and 2014 at the Neurological Hospital in Lyon were retrospectively included. CTS was accepted as the diagnosis only if clinical examination and ENMG both confirmed it. Nine patients (7.8 %) developed CTS in the 2 years following surgery, which is far beyond the 2.7/1000 incidence in the general population. The present study shows an overrepresentation of CTS occurrence after STN-DBS in PD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-016-8279-9DOI Listing
December 2016

Early Illustrations of Geste Antagoniste in Cervical and Generalized Dystonia.

Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov (N Y) 2015 21;5:332. Epub 2015 Sep 21.

Département de Psychiatrie et de Neurologie, Unité des Mouvements Anormaux, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, Grenoble, France ; INSERM Unité 836, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, France ; Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, France.

Background: Geste antagoniste, or sensory trick, is a voluntary maneuver that temporarily reduces the severity of dystonic postures or movements. We present a historical review of early reports and illustrations of geste antagoniste.

Results: In 1894, Brissaud described this phenomenon in Paris in patients with torticollis. He noted that a violent muscular contraction could be reversed by a minor voluntary action. He considered the improvement obtained by what he called "simple mannerisms, childish behaviour or fake pathological movements" was proof of the psychogenic origin of what he named mental torticollis. This concept was supported by photographical illustrations of the patients. The term geste antagoniste was used by Brissaud's pupils, Meige and Feindel, in their 1902 monograph on movement disorders. Other reports and illustrations of this sign were published in Europe between 1894 and 1906. Although not mentioned explicitly, geste antagoniste was also illustrated in a case report of generalized dystonia in Oppenheim's 1911 seminal description of dystonia musculorum deformans in Berlin.

Discussion: Brissaud-Meige's misinterpretation of the geste antagoniste unfortunately anchored the psychogenic origin of dystonia for decades. In New York, Herz brought dystonia back into the realm of organic neurology in 1944. Thereafter, it was given prominence by other authors, notably Fahn and Marsden in the 1970-1980s. Nowadays, neurologists routinely investigate for geste antagoniste when a dystonic syndrome is suspected, because it provides a further argument in favor of dystonia. The term alleviating maneuver was proposed in 2014 to replace sensory trick or geste antagoniste. This major sign is now part of the motor phenomenology of the 2013 Movement Disorder Society's classification of dystonia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7916/D8KD1X74DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4582593PMC
September 2015

History of physical and 'moral' treatment of hysteria.

Front Neurol Neurosci 2014 26;35:181-97. Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Centre de Neurosciences Cognitives, Service de Neurologie C, Hôpital Neurologique Pierre Wertheimer, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, Lyon, France.

This historical review presents the advances made mostly during the last 200 years on the description, concepts, theories, and (more specifically) cure of patients suffering from hysteria, a still obscure entity. The denomination of the syndrome has changed over time, from hysteria (reinvestigated by Paul Briquet and Jean-Martin Charcot) to pithiatism (Joseph Babinski), then to conversion neurosis (Sigmund Freud), and today functional neurological disorders according to the 2013 American Neurological Association DSM-5 classification. The treatment was renewed in the second half of the 19th century in Paris by Paul Briquet and then by Jean-Martin Charcot. Hysterical women, who represented the great majority of cases, were cured by physical therapy (notably physio-, hydro-, and electrotherapy, and in some cases ovary compression) and 'moral' therapies (general, causal therapy, rest, isolation, hypnosis, and suggestion). At the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries, psychotherapy, psychoanalysis, and persuasion were established respectively by Pierre Janet, Sigmund Freud, and Joseph Babinski. During World War I, military forces faced a large number of posttrauma neurosis cases among soldiers (named the 'Babinski-Froment war neurosis' and Myers 'shell shock', in the French and English literature, respectively). This led to the use of more brutal therapies in military hospitals, combining electrical shock and persuasion, particularly in France with Clovis Vincent and Gustave Roussy, but also in Great Britain and Germany. After World War I, this method was abandoned and there was a marked decrease in interest in hysteria for a long period of time. Today, the current treatment comprises (if possible intensive) physiotherapy, together with psychotherapy, and in some cases psychoanalysis. Antidepressants and anxiolytics may be required, and more recently cognitive and behavioral therapy. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is a new technique under investigation which may be promising in patients presenting with motor conversion syndrome (motor deficit or movement disorder). Functional neurological disorders remain a difficult problem to manage with frequent failures and chronic handicapping evolution. This emphasizes the need for therapeutic innovations in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360242DOI Listing
June 2015

Relapse of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep-brain stimulation discontinuation.

J Neurol 2014 Aug 12;261(8):1636-7. Epub 2014 Jun 12.

Service de neurologie C, Faculté de Médecine Lyon Sud Charles Mérieux, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital Neurologique Pierre Wertheimer, Université Lyon 1, Lyon, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00415-014-7404-xDOI Listing
August 2014

Relapsing polychondritis revealed by basal ganglia lesions.

Mov Disord 2012 Aug;27(9):1094-6

Department of Neurology, University-Hospital, Caen, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mds.23993DOI Listing
August 2012