Publications by authors named "Tejaswi Paruchuri"

9 Publications

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Ulcerative Dermatitis in C57BL/6NCrl Mice on a Low-Fat or High-Fat Diet With or Without a Mineralized Red-Algae Supplement.

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 2015 Sep;54(5):487-96

Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Ulcerative dermatitis (UD) is a spontaneous idiopathic disease that often affects C57BL/6 mice or mice on a C57BL/6 background. UD is characterized by intense pruritus and lesion formation, most commonly on the head or dorsal thorax. Self-trauma likely contributes to wound severity and delayed wound healing. Histologically, changes are nonspecific, consisting of ulceration with neutrophilic and mastocytic infiltration and epithelial hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis. Diet appears to have a profound effect on the development and progression of UD lesions. We investigated the incidence and severity of UD in C57BL/6NCrl mice on a high-fat western-style diet (HFWD) compared with a standard rodent chow. In addition, we examined the protective effects of dietary supplementation with a multimineral-rich product derived from marine red algae on UD in these 2 diet groups. HFWD-fed mice had an increased incidence of UD. In addition, mice on a HFWD had significantly more severe clinical and histologic lesions. Dietary mineral supplementation in mice on a HFWD decreased the histologic severity of lesions and reduced the incidence of UD in female mice in both diets. In conclusion, a high-fat western-style diet may potentiate UD in C57BL/6NCrl mice. Insufficient mineral supply and mineral imbalance may contribute to disease development. Mineral supplementation may be beneficial in the treatment of UD.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4587616PMC
September 2015

Progression of ulcerative dermatitis lesions in C57BL/6Crl mice and the development of a scoring system for dermatitis lesions.

J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 2012 ;51(5):586-93

Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Ulcerative dermatitis (UD) is a common, spontaneous condition in mice with a C57BL/6 background. Although initial lesions may be mild, UD is a progressive disease that often results in ulcerations or debilitating fibrotic contractures. In addition, lesions typically are unresponsive to treatment. Euthanasia is often warranted in severe cases, thereby affecting study outcomes through the loss of research subjects. Because the clinical assessment of UD can be subjective, a quantitative scoring method and documentation of the likely time-frame of progression may be helpful in predicting when animals that develop dermatitis should be removed from a study. Such a system may also be helpful in quantitatively assessing success of various treatment strategies and be valuable to clinical laboratory animal veterinarians. In this 1.5-y, prospective cohort study, we followed 200 mice to monitor the development and course of UD. Mice were examined every 2 wk. A clinical sign (alopecia, pruritus, or peripheral lymphadenopathy) was not identified that predicted development of UD lesions in the subsequent 2-wk period. Once UD developed, pruritus, the character of the lesion (single or multiple crust, coalescing crust, erosion, or ulceration), and the size of the lesion were the only parameters that changed (increased) over the course of the disease. Pruritus was a factor in the rapid progression of UD lesions. We used these findings to develop a quantitative scoring system for the severity of UD. This enhanced understanding of the progression of UD and the quantitative scoring system will enhance the monitoring of UD.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3447447PMC
November 2013

A multimineral natural product from red marine algae reduces colon polyp formation in C57BL/6 mice.

Nutr Cancer 2012 4;64(7):1020-8. Epub 2012 Oct 4.

Department of Pathology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

The goal of this study was to determine if a multimineral natural product derived from red marine algae could reduce colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. C57BL/6 mice were maintained for up to 18 mo either on a high-fat "Western-style" diet or on a low-fat diet (AIN 76A), with or without the multimineral-supplement. To summarize, colon polyps were detected in 22 of 70 mice (31%) on the high-fat diet but in only 2 of 70 mice (3%) receiving the mineral-supplemented high-fat diet (P < 0.0001). Colon polyps were detected in 16 of 70 mice (23%) in the low-fat group; not significantly different from high-fat group but significantly higher than the high-fat-supplemented group (P = 0.0006). This was in spite of the fact that the calcium level in the low-fat diet was comparable to the level of calcium in the high-fat diet containing the multimineral-product. Supplementation of the low-fat diet reduced the incidence to 8 of 70 mice (11% incidence). Taken together, these findings demonstrate that a multimineral natural product can protect mice on a high-fat diet against adenomatous polyp formation in the colon. These data suggest that increased calcium alone is insufficient to explain the lower incidence of colon polyps.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01635581.2012.713160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3660990PMC
March 2013

A mineral-rich extract from the red marine algae Lithothamnion calcareum preserves bone structure and function in female mice on a Western-style diet.

Calcif Tissue Int 2010 Apr 24;86(4):313-24. Epub 2010 Feb 24.

Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a mineral-rich extract derived from the red marine algae Lithothamnion calcareum could be used as a dietary supplement for prevention of bone mineral loss. Sixty C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups based on diet: the first group received a high-fat Western-style diet (HFWD), the second group was fed the same HFWD along with the mineral-rich extract included as a dietary supplement, and the third group was used as a control and was fed a low-fat rodent chow diet (AIN76A). Mice were maintained on the respective diets for 15 months. Then, long bones (femora and tibiae) from both males and females were analyzed by three-dimensional micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and (bones from female mice) concomitantly assessed in bone strength studies. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), osteocalcin, and N-terminal peptide of type I procollagen (PINP) were assessed in plasma samples obtained from female mice at the time of sacrifice. To summarize, female mice on the HFWD had reduced bone mineralization and reduced bone strength relative to female mice on the low-fat chow diet. The bone defects in female mice on the HFWD were overcome in the presence of the mineral-rich supplement. In fact, female mice receiving the mineral-rich supplement in the HFWD had better bone structure/function than did female mice on the low-fat chow diet. Female mice on the mineral-supplemented HFWD had higher plasma levels of TRAP than mice of the other groups. There were no differences in the other two markers. Male mice showed little diet-specific differences by micro-CT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00223-010-9340-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2877502PMC
April 2010

A mineral-rich red algae extract inhibits polyp formation and inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract of mice on a high-fat diet.

Integr Cancer Ther 2010 Mar 11;9(1):93-9. Epub 2010 Feb 11.

Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, 1301 Catherine Street, SPC 5602, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a mineral-rich extract derived from the red marine algae Lithothamnion calcareum could be used as a dietary supplement for chemoprevention against colon polyp formation. A total of 60 C57bl/6 mice were divided into 3 groups based on diet. One group received a low-fat, rodent chow diet (AIN76A). The second group received a high-fat "Western-style" diet (HFWD). The third group was fed the same HFWD with the mineral-rich extract included as a dietary supplement. Mice were maintained on the respective diets for 15 months. Autopsies were performed at the time of death or at the completion of the study. To summarize, the cumulative mortality rate was higher in mice on the HFWD during the 15-month period (55%) than in mice from the low-fat diet or the extract-supplemented high-fat diet groups (20% and 30%, respectively; P < .05 with respect to both). Autopsies revealed colon polyps in 20% of the animals on the HFWD and none in animals of the other 2 groups (P < .05). In addition to the grossly visible polyps, areas of hyperplasia in the colonic mucosa and inflammatory foci throughout the gastrointestinal tract were observed histologically in animals on the high-fat diet. Both were significantly reduced in animals on the low-fat diet and animals on the extract-supplemented HFWD.These data suggest that the mineral-rich algae extract may provide a novel approach to chemoprevention in the colon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534735409360360DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2861409PMC
March 2010

Collagenolytic activity is suppressed in organ-cultured human skin exposed to a gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent.

Invest Radiol 2010 Jan;45(1):42-8

Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

Objective: Human skin produces increased amounts of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) when exposed in organ culture to Omniscan, one of the gadolinium-based MRI contrast agents (GBCA). MMP-1, by virtue of its ability to degrade structural collagen, contributes to collagen turnover in the skin. The objective of the present study was to determine whether collagenolytic activity was concomitantly up-regulated with increased enzyme.

Materials And Methods: Skin biopsies from normal volunteers were exposed in organ culture to Omniscan. Organ culture fluids obtained from control and treated skin were examined for ability to degrade type I collagen. The same culture fluids were examined for levels of MMP-1, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and complexes of MMP-1 and TIMP-1.

Results: Although MMP-1 was increased in culture fluid from Omniscan-treated skin, there was no increase in collagenolytic activity. In fact, collagenolytic activity declined. Increased production of TIMP-1 was also observed in Omniscan-treated skin, and the absolute amount of TIMP-1 was greater than the amount of MMP-1. Virtually all of the MMP-1 was present in MMP-1-TIMP-1 complexes, but the majority of TIMP-1 was not associated with MMP-1. When human dermal fibroblasts were exposed to TIMP-1 (up to 250 ng/mL), no increase in proliferation was observed, but an increase in collagen deposition into the cell layer was seen.

Conclusion: Gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent exposure has recently been linked to a fibrotic skin condition in patients with impaired kidney function. The mechanism is unknown. The increase in TIMP-1 production and concomitant reduction in collagenolytic activity demonstrated here could result in decreased collagen turnover and increased deposition of collagen in lesional skin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/RLI.0b013e3181bf95ebDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2819152PMC
January 2010

Human colon tissue in organ culture: preservation of normal and neoplastic characteristics.

In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim 2010 Feb;46(2):114-22

Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

Normal and neoplastic human colon tissue obtained at surgery was used to establish conditions for organ culture. Optimal conditions included an atmosphere of 5% CO2 and 95% O2; tissue partially submerged with mucosa at the gas interface; and serum-free medium with 1.5 mM Ca2+ and a number of growth supplements. Histological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical features that distinguish normal and neoplastic tissue were preserved over a 2-d period. With normal tissue, this included the presence of elongated crypts with small, densely packed cells at the crypt base and mucin-containing goblet cells in the upper portion. Ki67 staining, for proliferating cells, was confined to the lower third of the crypt, while expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor was seen in the upper third and surface epithelium. E-cadherin and β-catenin were expressed throughout the epithelium and confined to the cell surface. In tumor tissue, the same disorganized, abnormal glandular structures seen at time zero were present after 2 d. The majority of cells in these structures were mucin-poor, but occasional goblet cells were seen and mucin staining was present. Ki67 staining was seen throughout the abnormal epithelium and calcium-sensing receptor expression was weak and variable. E-cadherin was seen at the cell surface (similar to normal tissue), but in some places, there was diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Finally, intense cytoplasmic and nuclear β-catenin staining was observed in cultured neoplastic tissue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11626-009-9247-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2889208PMC
February 2010

The Göttingen minipig for assessment of retinoid efficacy in the skin: comparison of results from topically treated animals with results from organ-cultured skin.

In Vitro Cell Dev Biol Anim 2009 Oct 18;45(9):551-7. Epub 2009 Jun 18.

Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, 1301 Catherine St., Spc 5602, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-5602, USA,

Göttingen minipigs were treated topically for 6 d with a novel retinoid (MDI 301) at concentrations ranging from 0.3% to 30% in cream vehicle. Treatment of the minipigs did not adversely affect their health (hematological and necropsy parameters) or produce changes in the skin suggestive of retinoid-induced skin irritation. After killing the animals, skin samples from each treatment site were excised and maintained in organ culture for 6 d. In addition, untreated skin was also maintained in organ culture and treated with MDI 301 (0.1-5 microg/ml). After 3 d, the culture supernatants were collected and analyzed for levels of collagen type I and for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Both skin samples treated in vivo and skin samples exposed to MDI 301 in culture demonstrated increased collagen production. Only slight changes in levels of MMP-2 (gelatinase A) or MMP-9 (gelatinase B) were seen. After 6 d, the organ-cultured skin was fixed in formalin and prepared for histology. The organ-cultured skin was compared to skin that was fixed at killing after in vivo treatment. Epidermal hyperplasia was quantified at various MDI 301 concentrations. In vivo and in vitro treatments showed similar results-although the thickness was not substantially changed on average, there were focal areas of hyperplasia at higher retinoid concentrations. Taken together, these data suggest that MDI 301 enhances collagen production in minipig skin, without irritation. Furthermore, these studies suggest that minipig skin exposed to the retinoid in organ culture is equally predictive as topically treated skin. The in vitro organ culture approach may provide a cost-effective alternative model to that of the intact animal for skin retinoid testing.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11626-009-9221-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2820557PMC
October 2009

Growth-inhibitory effects of a mineralized extract from the red marine algae, Lithothamnion calcareum, on Ca(2+)-sensitive and Ca(2+)-resistant human colon carcinoma cells.

Cancer Lett 2009 Oct 24;283(2):186-92. Epub 2009 Apr 24.

Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, 1301 Catherine Street, SPC 5602, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

Proliferation and differentiation were assessed in a series of human colon carcinoma cell lines in response to a mineral-rich extract derived from the red marine algae, Lithothamnion calcareum. The extract contains 12% Ca2+, 1% Mg2+, and detectable amounts of 72 trace elements, but essentially no organic material. The red algae extract was as effective as inorganic Ca2+ alone in suppressing growth and inducing differentiation of colon carcinoma cells that are responsive to a physiological level of extracellular Ca2+ (1.4mM). However, with cells that are resistant to Ca2+ alone, the extract was still able to reduce proliferation and stimulate differentiation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canlet.2009.03.037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2770718PMC
October 2009