Publications by authors named "Tatyana V Nikitina"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

46,XY,r(8)/45,XY,-8 Mosaicism as a Possible Mechanism of the Imprinted Birk-Barel Syndrome: A Case Study.

Genes (Basel) 2020 12 9;11(12). Epub 2020 Dec 9.

Research Institute of Medical Genetics, Tomsk National Research Medical Center (NRMC), Ushaika Street 10, 634050 Tomsk, Russia.

Ring chromosome 8 (r(8)) is one of the least frequent ring chromosomes. Usually, maternal chromosome 8 forms a ring, which can be lost from cells due to mitotic instability. The 8q24 region contains the imprinted gene, which is expressed from the maternal allele. Heterozygous mutations are associated with the imprinting disorder Birk-Barel syndrome. Here, we report a 2.5-year-old boy with developmental delay, microcephaly, dysmorphic features, diffuse muscle hypotonia, feeding problems, motor alalia and noncoarse neurogenic type of disturbance of muscle electrogenesis, partially overlapping with Birk-Barel syndrome phenotype. Cytogenetic analysis of lymphocytes revealed his karyotype to be 46,XY,r(8)(p23q24.3)[27]/45,XY,-8[3]. A de novo 7.9 Mb terminal 8p23.3p23.1 deletion, a 27.1 Mb 8p23.1p11.22 duplication, and a 4.4 Mb intact segment with a normal copy number located between them, as well as a 154-kb maternal gene deletion (9p21.2) with unknown clinical significance were identified by aCGH + SNP array. These aberrations were confirmed by real-time PCR. According to FISH analysis, the 8p23.1-p11.22 duplication was inverted. The ring chromosome originated from maternal chromosome 8. Targeted massive parallel sequencing did not reveal the mutations associated with Birk-Barel syndrome. Our data allow to assume that autosomal monosomy with inactive allele of imprinted gene arising from the loss of a ring chromosome in some somatic cells may be an etiological mechanism of mosaic imprinting disorders, presumably with less severe phenotype.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/genes11121473DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7763634PMC
December 2020

LINE-1 retrotransposon methylation in chorionic villi of first trimester miscarriages with aneuploidy.

J Assist Reprod Genet 2021 Jan 10;38(1):139-149. Epub 2020 Nov 10.

Research Institute of Medical Genetics, Tomsk National Research Medical Center, Nab. R. Ushaiki, 10, Tomsk, Russia.

Purpose: High frequency of aneuploidy in meiosis and cleavage stage coincides with waves of epigenetic genome reprogramming that may indicate a possible association between epigenetic mechanisms and aneuploidy occurrence. This study aimed to assess the methylation level of the long interspersed repeat element 1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon in chorionic villi of first trimester miscarriages with a normal karyotype and aneuploidy.

Methods: The methylation level was assessed at 19 LINE-1 promoter CpG sites in chorionic villi of 141 miscarriages with trisomy of chromosomes 2, 6, 8-10, 13-15, 16, 18, 20-22, and monosomy X using massive parallel sequencing.

Results: The LINE-1 methylation level was elevated statistically significant in chorionic villi of miscarriages with both trisomy (45.2 ± 4.3%) and monosomy X (46.9 ± 4.2%) compared with that in induced abortions (40.0 ± 2.4%) (p < 0.00001). The LINE-1 methylation levels were specific for miscarriages with different aneuploidies and significantly increased in miscarriages with trisomies 8, 14, and 18 and monosomy X (p < 0.05). The LINE-1 methylation level increased with gestational age both for group of miscarriages regardless of karyotype (R = 0.21, p = 0.012) and specifically for miscarriages with trisomy 16 (R = 0.48, p = 0.007). LINE-1 methylation decreased with maternal age in miscarriages with a normal karyotype (R = - 0.31, p = 0.029) and with trisomy 21 (R = - 0.64, p = 0.024) and increased with paternal age for miscarriages with trisomy 16 (R = 0.38, p = 0.048) and monosomy X (R = 0.73, p = 0.003).

Conclusion: Our results indicate that the pathogenic effects of aneuploidy in human embryogenesis can be supplemented with significant epigenetic changes in the repetitive sequences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10815-020-02003-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7823001PMC
January 2021

Delineation of Clinical Manifestations of the Inherited Xq24 Microdeletion Segregating with sXCI in Mothers: Two Novel Cases with Distinct Phenotypes Ranging from UBE2A Deficiency Syndrome to Recurrent Pregnancy Loss.

Cytogenet Genome Res 2020 30;160(5):245-254. Epub 2020 May 30.

Chromosomal microdeletion syndromes present with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes that depend on the size and gene content of the affected region. In a healthy carrier, epigenetic mechanisms may compensate for the same microdeletion, which may segregate through several generations without any clinical symptoms until the epigenetic modifications no longer function. We report 2 novel cases of Xq24 microdeletions inherited from mothers with extremely skewed X-chromosome inactivation (sXCI). The first case is a boy presenting with X-linked mental retardation, Nascimento type, due to a 168-kb Xq24 microdeletion involving 5 genes (CXorf56, UBE2A, NKRF, SEPT6, and MIR766) inherited from a healthy mother and grandmother with sXCI. In the second family, the presence of a 239-kb Xq24 microdeletion involving 3 additional genes (SLC25A43, SLC25A5-AS1, and SLC25A5) was detected in a woman with sXCI and a history of recurrent pregnancy loss with a maternal family history without reproductive wastages or products of conception. These cases provide evidence that women with an Xq24 microdeletion and sXCI may be at risk for having a child with intellectual disability or for experiencing a pregnancy loss due to the ontogenetic pleiotropy of a chromosomal microdeletion and its incomplete penetrance modified by sXCI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000508050DOI Listing
September 2020

Compound phenotype in a girl with r(22), concomitant microdeletion 22q13.32-q13.33 and mosaic monosomy 22.

Mol Cytogenet 2018 27;11:26. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

1Research Institute of Medical Genetics, Tomsk NRMC, Tomsk, Russia.

Background: Ring chromosome instability may influence a patient's phenotype and challenge its interpretation.

Results: Here, we report a 4-year-old girl with a compound phenotype. Cytogenetic analysis revealed her karyotype to be 46,XX,r(22). aCGH identified a 180 kb 22q13.32 duplication, a 2.024 Mb subtelomeric 22q13.32-q13.33 deletion, which is associated with Phelan-McDermid syndrome, and a maternal single gene 382-kb deletion of uncertain clinical significance located in the region of the 3q13.31 deletion syndrome. All chromosomal aberrations were confirmed by real-time PCR in lymphocytes and detected in skin fibroblasts. The deletions were also found in the buccal epithelium. According to FISH analysis, 8% and 24% of the patient's lymphocytes and skin fibroblasts, respectively, had monosomy 22.

Conclusions: We believe that a combination of 22q13.32-q13.33 deletion and monosomy 22 in a portion of cells can better define the clinical phenotype of the patient. Importantly, the presence of monosomic cells indicates ring chromosome instability, which may favor karyotype correction that is significant for the development of chromosomal therapy protocols.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13039-018-0375-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5923029PMC
April 2018

Allele-Specific Biased Expression of the CNTN6 Gene in iPS Cell-Derived Neurons from a Patient with Intellectual Disability and 3p26.3 Microduplication Involving the CNTN6 Gene.

Mol Neurobiol 2018 Aug 11;55(8):6533-6546. Epub 2018 Jan 11.

Institute of Cytology and Genetics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, 630090, Russia.

Copy number variations (CNVs) of the human CNTN6 gene caused by megabase-scale microdeletions or microduplications in the 3p26.3 region are often the cause of neurodevelopmental disorders, including intellectual disability and developmental delay. Surprisingly, patients with different copy numbers of this gene display notable overlapping of neuropsychiatric symptoms. The complexity of the study of human neuropathologies is associated with the inaccessibility of brain material. This problem can be overcome through the use of reprogramming technologies that permit the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from fibroblasts and their subsequent in vitro differentiation into neurons. We obtained a set of iPS cell lines derived from a patient carrier of the CNTN6 gene duplication and from two healthy donors. All iPS cell lines displayed the characteristics of pluripotent cells. Some iPS cell lines derived from the patient and from healthy donors were differentiated in vitro by exogenous expression of the Ngn2 transcription factor or by spontaneous neural differentiation of iPS cells through the neural rosette stage. The obtained neurons showed the characteristics of mature neurons as judged by the presence of neuronal markers and by their electrophysiological characteristics. Analysis of allele-specific expression of the CNTN6 gene in these neuronal cells by droplet digital PCR demonstrated that the level of expression of the duplicated allele was significantly reduced compared to that of the wild-type allele. Importantly, according to the sequencing data, both copies of the CNTN6 gene, which were approximately 1 Mb in size, showed no any additional structural rearrangements.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12035-017-0851-5DOI Listing
August 2018

Recent insights into regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase III and the cellular functions of its transcripts.

Biol Chem 2011 May 22;392(5):395-404. Epub 2011 Mar 22.

Department of Biochemistry, Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.

The products of transcription by the multisubunit enzyme RNA polymerase III (Pol III), such as 5S rRNA, tRNAs, U6 snRNA, are important for cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. The known range of the Pol III transcriptome has expanded over recent years, and novel functions of the newly discovered and already well known transcripts have been identified, including regulation of stress responses and apoptosis. Furthermore, transcription by Pol III has turned out to be strongly regulated, differing between diverse class III genes, among cell types and under stress conditions. The mechanisms involved in regulation of Pol III transcription are being elucidated and disturbances in that regulation have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer. This review summarizes the novel data on the regulation of RNA polymerase III transcription, including epigenetic and gene specific mechanisms and outlines recent insights into the cellular functions of the Pol III transcriptome, in particular of SINE RNAs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/BC.2011.049DOI Listing
May 2011

A mathematical model for evaluation of maternal cell contamination in cultured cells from spontaneous abortions: significance for cytogenetic analysis of prenatal selection factors.

Fertil Steril 2005 Apr;83(4):964-72

Cytogenetics Laboratory, Institute of Medical Genetics, Tomsk Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Ushaika Street 10, Tomsk 634050, Russia.

Objective: To develop a mathematical model for more precise estimation of the incidence of chromosomal abnormalities and the sex ratio among spontaneous abortions masked by maternal cell contamination.

Design: Retrospective analysis.

Setting: Academic medical center.

Patient(s): One hundred twelve samples of spontaneous abortion with a "46,XX" karyotype and 97 parents with aborted embryos.

Intervention(s): The presence of Y chromosome DNA in native tissues of "46,XX" spontaneous abortions was detected by amelogenin locus analysis. Detection of aneuploidies in noncultured tissues of "46,XX" abortions was performed by microsatellite DNA analysis and confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Accuracy of cytogenetic evaluation of spontaneous abortions.

Result(s): Y chromosome DNA was revealed in 16% of the embryos with a "46,XX" karyotype. According to the mathematical model proposed, the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in a sample of 478 abortions increased from 54.6% to 60.3%, and the sex ratio in embryos with normal karyotype changed from 0.66 to 1.02. The experimental validation of the model has shown that the observed and expected incidences of chromosomal abnormalities in "46,XX" abortions were in good agreement.

Conclusion(s): Maternal cell contamination clearly affects the incidence of registered chromosomal abnormalities and the sex ratio in spontaneous abortions. Correction for maternal cell contamination should be taken into account before invoking biological explanations of sex ratio bias and might be useful to include in diagnostic reporting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2004.12.009DOI Listing
April 2005

Features of chromosomal abnormalities in spontaneous abortion cell culture failures detected by interphase FISH analysis.

Eur J Hum Genet 2004 Jul;12(7):513-20

Cytogenetics Laboratory, Institute of Medical Genetics, Tomsk Scientific Centre, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 634050 Tomsk, Russia.

Cytogenetic analysis of reproductive wastage is an important stage in understanding the genetic background of early embryogenesis. The results of conventional cytogenetic studies of spontaneous abortions depend on tissue culturing and are associated with a significant cell culture failure rate. We performed interphase dual-colour FISH analysis to detect chromosomal abnormalities in noncultured cells from two different tissues-cytotrophoblast and extraembryonic mesoderm-of 60 first-trimester spontaneous abortions from which cells had failed to grow in culture. An original algorithm was proposed to optimize the interphase karyotype screening with a panel of centromere-specific DNA probes for all human chromosomes. The overall rate of numerical chromosomal abnormalities in these cells was 53%. Both typical and rare forms of karyotype imbalance were found. The observation of six cases (19%) of monosomy 7, 15, 21 and 22 in mosaic form, with a predominant normal cell line, was the most unexpected finding. Cell lines with monosomies 21 and 22 were found both in cytotrophoblast and mesoderm, while cells with monosomy 7 and 15 were confined to the cytotrophoblast. The tissue-specific compartmentalization of cell lines with autosomal monosomies provides evidence that the aneuploidy of different human chromosomes may arise during different stages of intrauterine development. The effect of aneuploidy on selection may differ, however, depending on the specific chromosome. The abortions also revealed a high frequency of intratissue chromosomal mosaicism (94%), in comparison with that detected by conventional cytogenetic analysis (29%; P<0.001). Confined placental mosaicism was found in 25% of the embryos. The results of molecular cytogenetic analysis of these cell culture failures illustrate that the diversity and phenotypic effects of chromosomal abnormalities during the early stages of human development are underestimated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201178DOI Listing
July 2004