Publications by authors named "Tatyana I Burykina"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Parkinson's disease and pesticides: Are microRNAs the missing link?

Sci Total Environ 2020 Nov 29;744:140591. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Department of Neurology, Laboratory of Neurogenetics, University Hospital of Larissa, Greece, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece.

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that leads to significant morbidity and decline in the quality of life. It develops due to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and among its pathogenic factors oxidative stress plays a critical role in disease progression. Pesticides are a broad class of chemicals widely used in agriculture and households for the protection of crops from insects and fungi. Several of them have been incriminated as risk factors for PD, but the underlying mechanisms have yet to be fully understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that play an important role in regulating mRNA translation and protein synthesis. miRNA levels have been shown to be affected in several diseases as well. Since the studies on the association between pesticides and PD have yet to reach definitive conclusions, here we review recent evidence on deregulated microRNAs upon pesticide exposure, and attempt to find an overlap between miRNAs deregulated in PD and pesticides, as a missing link between the two, and enhance future research in this direction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.140591DOI Listing
November 2020

Analysis of the intricate effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols on inflammatory pathways in health and disease.

Food Chem Toxicol 2020 Sep 5;143:111558. Epub 2020 Jul 5.

Laboratory of Toxicology and Forensic Sciences, Medical School, University of Crete, 71003, Heraklion, Greece; Department of Analytical and Forensic Medical Toxicology, Sechenov University, 2-4 Bolshaya Pirogovskaya st, 119991, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address:

Prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, arthritis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and various infectious diseases; lately most notably COVID-19 have been in the front line of research worldwide. Although targeting different organs, these pathologies have common biochemical impairments - redox disparity and, prominently, dysregulation of the inflammatory pathways. Research data have shown that diet components like polyphenols, poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), fibres as well as lifestyle (fasting, physical exercise) are important factors influencing signalling pathways with a significant potential to improve metabolic homeostasis and immune cells' functions. In the present manuscript we have reviewed scientific data from recent publications regarding the beneficial cellular and molecular effects induced by dietary plant products, mainly polyphenolic compounds and PUFAs, and summarize the clinical outcomes expected from these types of interventions, in a search for effective long-term approaches to improve the immune system response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2020.111558DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7335494PMC
September 2020

Behavioral impacts of a mixture of six pesticides on rats.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Jul 15;727:138491. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok, Russian Federation; Pacific Geographical Institute FEB RAS, Vladivostok, Russian Federation. Electronic address:

Pesticides can potentially contribute to the development of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. This study evaluates the effects of a six-pesticide mixture at doses around the no-observed-adverse-effectlevels (0 × NOAEL, control) and 0.25, 1 and 5 × NOAEL on behavior of Wistar rats. After 3, 6 and 12 months, rats were observed for neurobehavioral changes using the techniques of elevated plus maze and universal problemchamber, and the experiment was conducted thrice. The 3-month exposure revealed a decrease in the cognitive ability at the dose of 5 × NOAEL, and a dose-dependent research activity and anxiety. The 6-month exposurerevealed non-monotonic effects on the cognitive ability, with a decrease by 0.25 and 5 × NOAEL, as well as non-monotonic effects on anxiety, withan increase by 0.25 and 1 × NOAEL. A decrease was also observed in research activity at 5 × NOAEL. However, the 12-month exposure resulted to an increase in cognitive ability by 0.25 × NOAEL and in anxiety by 1 × NOAEL, as well as to a dose-dependent research activity. Repeating the trial showed that the cognitive ability increased from one trial to another, while the researching activity decreased and the anxiety increased by 0× NOAEL. In the groups exposed to pesticides mixture, the trends were different, showing that the exposure to pesticides combined with repeated trials, also influence the response of the animals. The resultsdemonstrate the occurrence of several dose-dependent behavioral responses, with negative effects occurring at doses that are considered safe. This study provides novel insights about time-dependent mixtures biology, and an important perspective to consider when conducting risk assessments.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.138491DOI Listing
July 2020

An imazamox-based herbicide causes apoptotic changes in rat liver and pancreas.

Toxicol Rep 2019 19;6:42-50. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Department of Toxicology & Forensic Sciences, Faculty Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.

We studied the acute toxicity of an imazamox-based herbicide at 12, 24 and 36 mg/kg body (bw) weight imazamox equivalent dose on the liver and pancreatic tissue in Sprague Dawley rats. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities, glucose, calcium as well as creatinine, were determined in blood samples, which were collected after 24, 48 and 72 h exposure. Caspase 3 and anti-insulin expression and immunopositivity were evaluated using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The imazamox-based herbicide evaluated in this study induced toxic effects even from the lowest dose tested (12 mg/kg bw). The two highest doses caused a statistically significant cytotoxicity on the Langerhans islet cells. Necrotic and degenerative changes were detected in hepatocytes at the two highest doses. Imazamox is considered to be poorly toxic to the liver. Nevertheless, the imazamox-based herbicide formulation tested here reduced the size of the β-islet cells, induced an elevation in serum glucose and calcium. Our data shows that commercial formulations of imazamox containing various co-formulants can have hepatic and pancreatic toxic effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxrep.2018.11.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6289906PMC
November 2018
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