Publications by authors named "Taryn M Boucher"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Adjuvant Hepatic Artery Infusion Chemotherapy is Associated With Improved Survival Regardless of KRAS Mutation Status in Patients With Resected Colorectal Liver Metastases: A Retrospective Analysis of 674 Patients.

Ann Surg 2020 08;272(2):352-356

Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.

Objective: To investigate the impact of adjuvant hepatic artery infusion (HAI) in relation to KRAS mutational status in patients with resected colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM).

Background: Patients with KRAS-mutated CRLM have worse outcomes after resection. Adjuvant HAI chemotherapy improves overall survival after liver resection.

Methods: Patients with resected CRLM treated at MSKCC with and without adjuvant HAI who had available KRAS status (wild-type, WT; mutated, MUT) were reviewed from a prospectively maintained institutional database. Correlations between KRAS status, adjuvant HAI, clinical factors, and outcomes were analyzed. Cox proportional hazard model was used to adjust for confounders.

Results: Between 1993 and 2012, 674 patients (418 KRAS-WT, 256 MUT) with a median follow up of 6.5 years after resection were evaluated. Fifty-four percent received adjuvant HAI. Tumor characteristics (synchronous disease, number of lesions, clinical-risk score, 2-stage hepatectomy) were significantly worse in the HAI group; however, there were more patients with resected extrahepatic metastases in the no-HAI group. In KRAS-WT tumors, 5-year survival was 78% for patients treated with HAI versus 57% for patients without HAI [hazard ratio (HR) 0.51, P < 0.001]. In KRAS-MUT tumors, 5-year survival was 59% for patients treated with HAI versus 40% for patients without HAI (HR 0.56, P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, HAI remained associated with improved OS (HR 0.53, P < 0.002) independent of KRAS status and other clinicopathologic factors.

Conclusion: Adjuvant HAI after resection of CRLM is independently associated with improved outcomes regardless of KRAS mutational status. Adjuvant HAI may mitigate the worse outcomes seen in patients with resectable KRAS-MUT CRLM.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000003248DOI Listing
August 2020

Assessment of Hepatic Arterial Infusion of Floxuridine in Combination With Systemic Gemcitabine and Oxaliplatin in Patients With Unresectable Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: A Phase 2 Clinical Trial.

JAMA Oncol 2019 Oct 31. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Importance: Unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHC) carries a poor prognosis, with a median overall survival (OS) of 11 months. Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of high-dose chemotherapy may have potential benefit in these patients.

Objective: To evaluate clinical outcomes when HAI chemotherapy is combined with systemic chemotherapy in patients with unresectable IHC.

Design, Setting, And Participants: A single-institution, phase 2 clinical trial including 38 patients was conducted with HAI floxuridine plus systemic gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with unresectable IHC at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between May 20, 2013, and June 27, 2019. A confirmatory phase 1/2 study using the same therapy was conducted during the same time period at Washington University in St Louis. Patients with histologically confirmed, unresectable IHC were eligible. Resectable metastatic disease to regional lymph nodes and prior systemic therapy were permitted. Patients with distant metastatic disease were excluded.

Interventions: Hepatic arterial infusion of floxuridine and systemic administration of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin.

Main Outcomes And Measures: The primary outcome was progression-free survival (PFS) of 80% at 6 months.

Results: For the phase 2 clinical trial at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 42 patients with unresectable IHC were included and, of these, 38 patients were treated (13 [34%] men; median [range] age at diagnosis, 64 [39-81] years). The median follow-up was 30.5 months. Twenty-two patients (58%) achieved a partial radiographic response, and 32 patients (84%) achieved disease control at 6 months. Four patients had sufficient response to undergo resection, and 1 patient had a complete pathologic response. The median PFS was 11.8 months (1-sided 90% CI, 11.1) with a 6-month PFS rate of 84.1% (90% CI, 74.8%-infinity), thereby meeting the primary end point (6-month PFS rate, 80%). The median OS was 25.0 months (95% CI, 20.6-not reached), and the 1-year OS rate was 89.5% (95% CI, 80.2%-99.8%). Patients with resectable regional lymph nodes (18 [47%]) showed no difference in OS compared with patients with node-negative disease (24-month OS: lymph node negative: 60%; 95% CI, 40%-91% vs lymph node positive: 50%; 95% CI, 30%-83%; P = .66). Four patients (11%) had grade 4 toxic effects requiring removal from the study (1 portal hypertension, 2 gastroduodenal artery aneurysms, 1 infection in the pump pocket). Subgroup analysis showed significant improvement in survival in patients with IDH1/2 mutated tumors (2-year OS, 90%; 95% CI, 73%-99%) vs wild-type (2-year OS, 33%; 95% CI, 18%-63%) (P = .01). In the Washington University in St Louis confirmatory cohort, 9 patients (90%) achieved disease control at 6 months; the most common grade 3 toxic effect was elevated results of liver function tests, and median PFS was 12.8 months (1-sided 90% CI, 6.4).

Conclusions And Relevance: Hepatic arterial infusion plus systemic chemotherapy appears to be highly active and tolerable in patients with unresectable IHC; further evaluation is warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.3718DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6824231PMC
October 2019

Genomic stratification beyond Ras/B-Raf in colorectal liver metastasis patients treated with hepatic arterial infusion.

Cancer Med 2019 11 10;8(15):6538-6548. Epub 2019 Sep 10.

Department of Medicine, MSKCC, New York City, New York, USA.

Background: Resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) can cure disease, but many patients with extensive disease cannot be fully resected and others recur following surgery. Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy can convert extensive liver disease to a resectable state or decrease recurrence risk, but response varies and no biomarkers currently exist to identify patients most likely to benefit.

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of CLM patients receiving HAI chemotherapy whose tumors underwent MSK-IMPACT sequencing. The frequency of oncogenic alterations and their association with overall survival (OS) and objective response rate were analyzed at the individual gene and signaling pathway levels.

Results: Three hundred and seventy patients met inclusion criteria: 189 (51.1%) who underwent colorectal liver metastasectomy followed by HAI + systemic therapy (Adjuvant cohort), and 181 (48.9%) with unresectable CLM (Metastatic cohort) who received HAI + systemic therapy, consisting of 63 (34.8%) with extrahepatic disease and 118 (65.2%) with liver-restricted disease. Genomic alterations were similar in each cohort, and no individual gene or pathway was significantly associated with objective response. Patients in the adjuvant cohort with concurrent Ras/B-Raf alteration and SMAD4 inactivation had worse prognosis while in the metastatic cohort patients with co-alteration of Ras/B-Raf and TP53 had worse OS. Similar findings were observed in a validation cohort.

Conclusions: Concurrently altered Ras/B-Raf and SMAD4 mutations were associated with worse survival in resectable patients, while concurrent Ras/B-Raf and TP53 alterations were associated with worse survival in unresectable patients. The mutual exclusivity of Ras/B-Raf, SMAD4, and TP53 may have prognostic value for CLM patients receiving HAI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.2415DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6825986PMC
November 2019

Relevance of CEA and LDH in relation to KRAS status in patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases.

J Surg Oncol 2017 Mar 23;115(4):480-487. Epub 2016 Dec 23.

Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Background: While the significance of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) status as individual prognostic factors for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer has been addressed, the relationship and interdependence between these prognostic factors on survival is limited.

Methods: Patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases with known KRAS status, and with baseline CEA and LDH levels who were treated with hepatic arterial infusion and systemic chemotherapy were identified. Patients were divided into two groups: hepatic-only disease and extra-hepatic disease.

Results: A total of 193 patients were included: 121 with hepatic-only and 72 with extra-hepatic disease. In the hepatic-only group, median overall survival (OS) was 55 months. On multivariate analysis, KRAS mutated tumors (HR 1.7, P < 0.05), LDH >200 U/L (HR 2.0, P < 0.05), and prior chemotherapy (HR 2.1, P < 0.05) had lower OS. In patients with extra-hepatic disease, median OS was 32 months. On multivariate analysis, baseline CEA >200 ng/mL (HR 2.1, P = 0.051), LDH >200 U/L (HR 3.8, P < 0.05), and right-sided tumors (HR 2.8, P < 0.05) had lower OS.

Conclusions: This analysis verifies two distinct patterns in terms of biomarkers in patients with unresectable colorectal liver metastases. In patients with hepatic-only disease, KRAS mutation and elevated LDH negatively influenced survival. In patients with extra-hepatic disease, elevated LDH negatively impacted survival.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24536DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5400688PMC
March 2017

Response rates of hepatic arterial infusion pump therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer liver metastases refractory to all standard chemotherapies.

J Surg Oncol 2016 Nov 26;114(6):655-663. Epub 2016 Aug 26.

Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Background And Objectives: To evaluate the role of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) liver metastases (LM) refractory to oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and fluorouracil-based treatments.

Methods: A search identified patients with mCRC treated after tumor progression on at least three standard systemic therapies.

Results: One hundred and ten patients met criteria for inclusion (i.e., progression on at least three standard agents). Fifty seven patients had LM-only and 53 patients had LM and low volume extrahepatic metastases (LME). Patients with LM-only and LME had a response rate (RR) of 33% and 36%, median survival of 20 months and 11.4 months, respectively. Patients with LM-only had progression free survival of 6 months and hepatic progression free survival of 7.56 months. In a secondary analysis, 46 patients were RECIST-refractory to all standard therapies: LM-only (n = 24) and LME (n = 22). LM-only and LME had a RR of 29% and 36%, and median survival 17.2 months and 9.1 months, respectively.

Conclusions: Patients with refractory mCRC LM can achieve a response to HAI resulting in antitumor activity and improvement in survival. Responses are rarely seen in such heavily treated patients with systemic therapy alone, suggesting a regional directed approach is useful. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:655-663. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24399DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5570459PMC
November 2016

Updated long-term survival for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with liver resection followed by hepatic arterial infusion and systemic chemotherapy.

J Surg Oncol 2016 Apr 2;113(5):477-84. Epub 2016 Feb 2.

Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York.

Background And Objectives: Patients who undergo liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have reported 5-year survivals ranging from 25% to 50%. The current study updated long-term survival for patients with resected liver metastases treated with adjuvant hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) and systemic (SYS) chemotherapy.

Methods: Updated survival and recurrence free survival for patients treated on four consecutive adjuvant protocols with HAI and SYS from 1991 to 2009. Patients were divided into two groups: those treated on protocols before 2003 and after 2003. Median follow-up for all patients was 11 years.

Results: All 287 patients enrolled in four prospective protocols after liver resection are included. Patients treated before 2003 had a median follow-up of 15 years, 5 and 10-year survivals of 56% [95%CI: 49-64%] and 40% [95%CI: 32-47%], respectively, and median survival of 71 months. Patients treated after 2003 had a median follow-up of 9 years, 5 and 10-year survivals of 78% [95%CI: 70-84%] and 61% [95%CI: 51-70%], respectively, and median survival has not been reached.

Conclusions: Survival is improving for patients with mCRC who undergo liver resection. These data support the durability of long-term survival in patients who undergo resection followed by adjuvant HAI and SYS therapy. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:477-484. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5076474PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24189DOI Listing
April 2016