Publications by authors named "Tarja Salonen"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Establishment of a spontaneously transformed cell line (JU-PI) from a myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma.

Tumour Biol 2018 May;40(5):1010428318777936

1 Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma is a soft-tissue neoplasm most frequently found in the distal extremities of middle-aged adults. Most myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma are low-grade tumors with propensity for local recurrence after incomplete removal. We report a myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma which developed in the foot of a 41-year-old male and showed an exceptionally aggressive course with metastatic spread and fatal outcome within 16 months. We managed to establish a spontaneously transformed continuous cell line, called JU-PI, from a metastatic lesion. The JU-PI cells have a sub-tetraploid karyotype including the 1;10 chromosomal translocation and amplification of the proximal end of 3p; these features are considered genetic signatures of myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma. Both the primary tumor and the JU-PI cells showed nuclear expression of the TFE3 transcription factor but TFE3-activating chromosomal rearrangements were not found. To our knowledge, JU-PI is the first established myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma cell line. JU-PI cells offer a tool for investigating the molecular oncology of myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1010428318777936DOI Listing
May 2018

Molecular alterations in pediatric brainstem gliomas.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2018 Jan 9;65(1). Epub 2017 Aug 9.

Department of Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) have a dismal prognosis. Previously, diagnosis was based on a typical clinical presentation and magnetic resonance imaging findings. After the start of the era of biopsies, DIPGs bearing H3 K27 mutations have been reclassified into a novel entity, diffuse midline glioma, based on the presence of this molecular alteration. However, it is not well established how clinically diagnosed DIPG overlap with H3 K27-mutated diffuse midline gliomas, and whether rare long-term survivors also belong to this group.

Methods: We studied tumor samples obtained at diagnosis or upon autopsy from 23 children, including two long-term survivors. Based on clinical, radiological, and histological findings, all tumors were previously diagnosed as DIPGs. All samples were analyzed for genetic alterations by next-generation sequencing (NGS) and for protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC).

Results: H3 K27 was mutated in NGS or IHC in 20 patients, excluding both long-term survivors. One of these long-term survivors harbored a mutation in IDH1, formerly considered to be an alteration absent in pediatric diffuse brainstem gliomas. Other altered genes in NGS included TP53 (10 patients), MET and PDGFRA (3 patients each), VEGFR and SMARCA4 (2 patients each), and PPARγ, PTEN and EGFR in 1 patient, respectively. IHC revealed cMYC expression in 15 of 24 (63%) of all samples, exclusively in the biopsies.

Conclusions: Eighty-seven percent of the tumors formerly diagnosed as DIPGs could be reclassified as H3 K27-mutated diffuse midline gliomas. Both long-term survivors lacked this alteration. Contrary to former conceptions, IDH1 mutations may occur also in pediatric brainstem gliomas.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.26751DOI Listing
January 2018

Increased expression of CIP2A in aggressive subtypes of B-cell lymphoma.

Histopathology 2013 Sep 26;63(3):438-9. Epub 2013 Jun 26.

Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/his.12162DOI Listing
September 2013

Glycosylation, transport, and complex formation of palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1)--distinct characteristics in neurons.

BMC Cell Biol 2007 Jun 12;8:22. Epub 2007 Jun 12.

Department of Molecular Medicine, National Public Health Institute, Biomedicum Helsinki, Haartmaninkatu 8, Helsinki, Finland.

Background: Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are collectively the most common type of recessively inherited childhood encephalopathies. The most severe form of NCL, infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL), is caused by mutations in the CLN1 gene, resulting in a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1). The deficiency of PPT1 causes a specific death of neocortical neurons by a mechanism, which is currently unclear. To understand the function of PPT1 in more detail, we have further analyzed the basic properties of the protein, especially focusing on possible differences in non-neuronal and neuronal cells.

Results: Our study shows that the N-glycosylation of N197 and N232, but not N212, is essential for PPT1's activity and intracellular transport. Deglycosylation of overexpressed PPT1 produced in neurons and fibroblasts demonstrates differentially modified PPT1 in different cell types. Furthermore, antibody internalization assays showed differences in PPT1 transport when compared with a thoroughly characterized lysosomal enzyme aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), an important observation potentially influencing therapeutic strategies. PPT1 was also demonstrated to form oligomers by size-exclusion chromatography and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Finally, the consequences of disease mutations were analyzed in the perspective of our new results, suggesting that the mutations increase both the degree of glycosylation of PPT1 and its ability to form complexes.

Conclusion: Our current study describes novel properties for PPT1. We observe differences in PPT1 processing and trafficking in neuronal and non-neuronal cells, and describe for the first time the ability of PPT1 to form complexes. Understanding the basic characteristics of PPT1 is fundamental in order to clarify the molecular pathogenesis behind neurodegeneration in INCL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2121-8-22DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1906764PMC
June 2007

Mice with Ppt1Deltaex4 mutation replicate the INCL phenotype and show an inflammation-associated loss of interneurons.

Neurobiol Dis 2005 Feb;18(1):226-41

Department of Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki and National Public Health Institute, Biomedicum Helsinki, FIN-00251 Helsinki, Finland.

Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (INCL) results from mutations in the palmitoyl protein thioesterase (PPT1, CLN1) gene and is characterized by dramatic death of cortical neurons. We generated Ppt1Deltaex4 mice by a targeted deletion of exon 4 of the mouse Ppt1 gene. Similar to the clinical phenotype, the homozygous mutants show loss of vision from the age of 8 weeks, seizures after 4 months and paralysis of hind limbs at the age of 5 months. Autopsy revealed a dramatic loss of brain mass and histopathology demonstrated accumulation of autofluorescent granular osmiophilic deposits (GRODS), both characteristic of INCL. At 6 months, the homozygous Ppt1Deltaex4 mice showed a prominent loss of GABAergic interneurons in several brain areas. The transcript profiles of wild-type and mutant mouse brains revealed that most prominent alterations involved parts of the immune response, implicating alterations similar to those of the aging brain and neurodegeneration. These findings make the Ppt1Deltaex4 mouse an interesting model for the inflammation-associated death of interneurons.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nbd.2004.08.013DOI Listing
February 2005

Localization of wild-type and mutant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis CLN8 proteins in non-neuronal and neuronal cells.

J Neurosci Res 2004 Jun;76(6):862-71

Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Department of Medical Genetics and Neuroscience Center, University of Helsinki, Finland.

Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a group of childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorders characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in many tissues, especially in neurons. Mutations in the CLN8 gene underlie Northern epilepsy (progressive epilepsy with mental retardation [EPMR], OMIM 600143) and a subset of Turkish variant late infantile NCL, but the pathogenetic mechanisms have remained elusive. The CLN8 transmembrane protein is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein that recycles between ER and ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) in non-neuronal cells. To explore the disease mechanisms, we have characterized the neuronal localization of wild-type CLN8 protein as well as CLN8 proteins representing patient mutations. Semliki Forest virus-mediated CLN8 protein localized in the ER of mouse hippocampal primary neurons when compared to subcellular markers by immunofluorescence analysis. We also analyzed the possible polarized targeting of CLN8 and observed basolateral targeting in polarized epithelial CaCo-2 cells, suggesting that CLN8 may locate outside the ER or in a specialized subcompartment of the ER. We were not able, however, to demonstrate differential distribution of CLN8 between axons and dendrites of neurons. Fractionation of mouse brain tissue indicated that endogenous mouse Cln8 is observed in light membrane fractions, different from ER, which further suggested differential localization for CLN8 in polarized cells. The disease mutations did not affect intracellular localization of CLN8 in non-neuronal or neuronal cells. Consequently, there is no obvious genotype-phenotype correlation at the level of protein localization and thus mutations most likely directly affect functionally important domains of CLN8.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jnr.20133DOI Listing
June 2004