Publications by authors named "Tareq B Malas"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prioritization of novel ADPKD drug candidates from disease-stage specific gene expression profiles.

EBioMedicine 2020 Jan 24;51:102585. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Background: Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is one of the most common causes of end-stage renal failure, caused by mutations in PKD1 or PKD2 genes. Tolvaptan, the only drug approved for ADPKD treatment, results in serious side-effects, warranting the need for novel drugs.

Methods: In this study, we applied RNA-sequencing of Pkd1cko mice at different disease stages, and with/without drug treatment to identify genes involved in ADPKD progression that were further used to identify novel drug candidates for ADPKD. We followed an integrative computational approach using a combination of gene expression profiling, bioinformatics and cheminformatics data.

Findings: We identified 1162 genes that had a normalized expression after treating the mice with drugs proven effective in preclinical models. Intersecting these genes with target affinity profiles for clinically-approved drugs in ChEMBL, resulted in the identification of 116 drugs targeting 29 proteins, of which several are previously linked to Polycystic Kidney Disease such as Rosiglitazone. Further testing the efficacy of six candidate drugs for inhibition of cyst swelling using a human 3D-cyst assay, revealed that three of the six had cyst-growth reducing effects with limited toxicity.

Interpretation: Our data further establishes drug repurposing as a robust drug discovery method, with three promising drug candidates identified for ADPKD treatment (Meclofenamic Acid, Gamolenic Acid and Birinapant). Our strategy that combines multiple-omics data, can be extended for ADPKD and other diseases in the future.

Funding: European Union's Seventh Framework Program, Dutch Technology Foundation Stichting Technische Wetenschappen and the Dutch Kidney Foundation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2019.11.046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7000333PMC
January 2020

Drug prioritization using the semantic properties of a knowledge graph.

Sci Rep 2019 04 18;9(1):6281. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Compounds that are candidates for drug repurposing can be ranked by leveraging knowledge available in the biomedical literature and databases. This knowledge, spread across a variety of sources, can be integrated within a knowledge graph, which thereby comprehensively describes known relationships between biomedical concepts, such as drugs, diseases, genes, etc. Our work uses the semantic information between drug and disease concepts as features, which are extracted from an existing knowledge graph that integrates 200 different biological knowledge sources. RepoDB, a standard drug repurposing database which describes drug-disease combinations that were approved or that failed in clinical trials, is used to train a random forest classifier. The 10-times repeated 10-fold cross-validation performance of the classifier achieves a mean area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 92.2%. We apply the classifier to prioritize 21 preclinical drug repurposing candidates that have been suggested for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD). Mozavaptan, a vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist is predicted to be the drug most likely to be approved after a clinical trial, and belongs to the same drug class as tolvaptan, the only treatment for ADPKD that is currently approved. We conclude that semantic properties of concepts in a knowledge graph can be exploited to prioritize drug repurposing candidates for testing in clinical trials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-42806-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6472420PMC
April 2019

Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of pathogenic mycobacteria and their esx-1 mutants reveal secretion-dependent regulation of ESX-1 substrates and WhiB6 as a transcriptional regulator.

PLoS One 2019 23;14(1):e0211003. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Pathogen Genomics Laboratory, BESE Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal-Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

The mycobacterial type VII secretion system ESX-1 is responsible for the secretion of a number of proteins that play important roles during host infection. The regulation of the expression of secreted proteins is often essential to establish successful infection. Using transcriptome sequencing, we found that the abrogation of ESX-1 function in Mycobacterium marinum leads to a pronounced increase in gene expression levels of the espA operon during the infection of macrophages. In addition, the disruption of ESX-1-mediated protein secretion also leads to a specific down-regulation of the ESX-1 substrates, but not of the structural components of this system, during growth in culture medium. This effect is observed in both M. marinum and M. tuberculosis. We established that down-regulation of ESX-1 substrates is the result of a regulatory process that is influenced by the putative transcriptional regulator whib6, which is located adjacent to the esx-1 locus. In addition, the overexpression of the ESX-1-associated PE35/PPE68 protein pair resulted in a significantly increased secretion of the ESX-1 substrate EsxA, demonstrating a functional link between these proteins. Taken together, these data show that WhiB6 is required for the secretion-dependent regulation of ESX-1 substrates and that ESX-1 substrates are regulated independently from the structural components, both during infection and as a result of active secretion.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211003PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343904PMC
October 2019

Comparative transcriptomics of shear stress treated Pkd1 cells and pre-cystic kidneys reveals pathways involved in early polycystic kidney disease.

Biomed Pharmacother 2018 Dec 1;108:1123-1134. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden, the Netherlands. Electronic address:

Mutations in the PKD1 or PKD2 genes are the cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The encoded proteins localize within the cell membrane and primary cilia and are proposed to be involved in mechanotransduction. Therefore, we evaluate shear stress dependent signaling in renal epithelial cells and the relevance for ADPKD. Using RNA sequencing and pathway analysis, we compared gene expression of in vitro shear stress treated Pkd1 renal epithelial cells and in vivo pre-cystic Pkd1del models. We show that shear stress alters the same signaling pathways in Pkd1 renal epithelial cells and Pkd1 controls. However, expression of a number of genes was slightly more induced by shear stress in Pkd1 cells, suggesting that Pkd1 has the function to restrain shear regulated signaling instead of being a mechano-sensing activator. We also compared altered gene expression in Pkd1 cells during shear with in vivo transcriptome data of kidneys from Pkd1 mice at three early pre-cystic time-points. This revealed overlap of a limited number of differentially expressed genes. However, the overlap between cells and mice is much higher when looking at pathways and molecular processes, largely due to altered expression of paralogous genes. Several of the altered pathways in the in vitro and in vivo Pkd1 models are known to be implicated in ADPKD pathways, including PI3K-AKT, MAPK, Hippo, calcium, Wnt, and TGF-β signaling. We hypothesize that increased activation of selected genes in renal epithelial cells early upon Pkd1 gene disruption may disturb the balance in signaling and may contribute to cyst formation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2018.07.178DOI Listing
December 2018

Comprehensive transcriptome analysis of fluid shear stress altered gene expression in renal epithelial cells.

J Cell Physiol 2018 04 20;233(4):3615-3628. Epub 2017 Nov 20.

Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Renal epithelial cells are exposed to mechanical forces due to flow-induced shear stress within the nephrons. Shear stress is altered in renal diseases caused by tubular dilation, obstruction, and hyperfiltration, which occur to compensate for lost nephrons. Fundamental in regulation of shear stress are primary cilia and other mechano-sensors, and defects in cilia formation and function have profound effects on development and physiology of kidneys and other organs. We applied RNA sequencing to get a comprehensive overview of fluid-shear regulated genes and pathways in renal epithelial cells. Functional enrichment-analysis revealed TGF-β, MAPK, and Wnt signaling as core signaling pathways up-regulated by shear. Inhibitors of TGF-β and MAPK/ERK signaling modulate a wide range of mechanosensitive genes, identifying these pathways as master regulators of shear-induced gene expression. However, the main down-regulated pathway, that is, JAK/STAT, is independent of TGF-β and MAPK/ERK. Other up-regulated cytokine pathways include FGF, HB-EGF, PDGF, and CXC. Cellular responses to shear are modified at several levels, indicated by altered expression of genes involved in cell-matrix, cytoskeleton, and glycocalyx remodeling, as well as glycolysis and cholesterol metabolism. Cilia ablation abolished shear induced expression of a subset of genes, but genes involved in TGF-β, MAPK, and Wnt signaling were hardly affected, suggesting that other mechano-sensors play a prominent role in the shear stress response of renal epithelial cells. Modulations in signaling due to variations in fluid shear stress are relevant for renal physiology and pathology, as suggested by elevated gene expression at pathological levels of shear stress compared to physiological shear.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcp.26222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5765508PMC
April 2018

Meta-analysis of polycystic kidney disease expression profiles defines strong involvement of injury repair processes.

Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 2017 04 1;312(4):F806-F817. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; and

Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a major cause of end-stage renal disease. The disease mechanisms are not well understood and the pathogenesis toward renal failure remains elusive. In this study, we present the first RNASeq analysis of a -mutant mouse model in a combined meta-analysis with other published PKD expression profiles. We introduce the PKD Signature, a set of 1,515 genes that are commonly dysregulated in PKD studies. We show that the signature genes include many known and novel PKD-related genes and functions. Moreover, genes with a role in injury repair, as evidenced by expression data and/or automated literature analysis, were significantly enriched in the PKD Signature, with 35% of the PKD Signature genes being directly implicated in injury repair. NF-κB signaling, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, inflammatory response, hypoxia, and metabolism were among the most prominent injury or repair-related biological processes with a role in the PKD etiology. Novel PKD genes with a role in PKD and in injury were confirmed in another -mutant mouse model as well as in animals treated with a nephrotoxic agent. We propose that compounds that can modulate the injury-repair response could be valuable drug candidates for PKD treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00653.2016DOI Listing
April 2017

Genomic expression catalogue of a global collection of BCG vaccine strains show evidence for highly diverged metabolic and cell-wall adaptations.

Sci Rep 2015 Oct 21;5:15443. Epub 2015 Oct 21.

Pathogen Genomics Group, Biological, Environmental Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, 23955-6900, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccines against tuberculosis have been available for more than 90 years, their effectiveness has been hindered by variable protective efficacy and a lack of lasting memory responses. One factor contributing to this variability may be the diversity of the BCG strains that are used around the world, in part from genomic changes accumulated during vaccine production and their resulting differences in gene expression. We have compared the genomes and transcriptomes of a global collection of fourteen of the most widely used BCG strains at single base-pair resolution. We have also used quantitative proteomics to identify key differences in expression of proteins across five representative BCG strains of the four tandem duplication (DU) groups. We provide a comprehensive map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation and insertions and deletions (indels) across fourteen BCG strains. Genome-wide SNP characterization allowed the construction of a new and robust phylogenic genealogy of BCG strains. Transcriptional and proteomic profiling revealed a metabolic remodeling in BCG strains that may be reflected by altered immunogenicity and possibly vaccine efficacy. Together, these integrated-omic data represent the most comprehensive catalogue of genetic variation across a global collection of BCG strains.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep15443DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4614345PMC
October 2015

Rhizosphere microbiome metagenomics of gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) in the Red Sea.

Gene 2016 Feb 10;576(2 Pt 1):626-36. Epub 2015 Nov 10.

King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Computational Bioscience Research Center (CBRC), Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering Division (CEMSE), Thuwal 23955-6900, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address:

Mangroves are unique, and endangered, coastal ecosystems that play a vital role in the tropical and subtropical environments. A comprehensive description of the microbial communities in these ecosystems is currently lacking, and additional studies are required to have a complete understanding of the functioning and resilience of mangroves worldwide. In this work, we carried out a metagenomic study by comparing the microbial community of mangrove sediment with the rhizosphere microbiome of Avicennia marina, in northern Red Sea mangroves, along the coast of Saudi Arabia. Our results revealed that rhizosphere samples presented similar profiles at the taxonomic and functional levels and differentiated from the microbiome of bulk soil controls. Overall, samples showed predominance by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, with high abundance of sulfate reducers and methanogens, although specific groups were selectively enriched in the rhizosphere. Functional analysis showed significant enrichment in 'metabolism of aromatic compounds', 'mobile genetic elements', 'potassium metabolism' and 'pathways that utilize osmolytes' in the rhizosphere microbiomes. To our knowledge, this is the first metagenomic study on the microbiome of mangroves in the Red Sea, and the first application of unbiased 454-pyrosequencing to study the rhizosphere microbiome associated with A. marina. Our results provide the first insights into the range of functions and microbial diversity in the rhizosphere and soil sediments of gray mangrove (A. marina) in the Red Sea.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2015.10.032DOI Listing
February 2016

Comprehensive evaluation of Toxoplasma gondii VEG and Neospora caninum LIV genomes with tachyzoite stage transcriptome and proteome defines novel transcript features.

PLoS One 2015 13;10(4):e0124473. Epub 2015 Apr 13.

Pathogen Genomics Laboratory, Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Toxoplasma gondii is an important protozoan parasite that infects all warm-blooded animals and causes opportunistic infections in immuno-compromised humans. Its closest relative, Neospora caninum, is an important veterinary pathogen that causes spontaneous abortion in livestock. Comparative genomics of these two closely related coccidians has been of particular interest to identify genes that contribute to varied host cell specificity and disease. Here, we describe a manual evaluation of these genomes based on strand-specific RNA sequencing and shotgun proteomics from the invasive tachyzoite stages of these two parasites. We have corrected predicted structures of over one third of the previously annotated gene models and have annotated untranslated regions (UTRs) in over half of the predicted protein-coding genes. We observe distinctly long UTRs in both the organisms, almost four times longer than other model eukaryotes. We have also identified a putative set of cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) and long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). We have significantly improved the annotation quality in these genomes that would serve as a manually curated dataset for Toxoplasma and Neospora research communities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0124473PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4395442PMC
April 2016

Genomic analysis of the causative agents of coccidiosis in domestic chickens.

Genome Res 2014 Oct 11;24(10):1676-85. Epub 2014 Jul 11.

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, United Kingdom;

Global production of chickens has trebled in the past two decades and they are now the most important source of dietary animal protein worldwide. Chickens are subject to many infectious diseases that reduce their performance and productivity. Coccidiosis, caused by apicomplexan protozoa of the genus Eimeria, is one of the most important poultry diseases. Understanding the biology of Eimeria parasites underpins development of new drugs and vaccines needed to improve global food security. We have produced annotated genome sequences of all seven species of Eimeria that infect domestic chickens, which reveal the full extent of previously described repeat-rich and repeat-poor regions and show that these parasites possess the most repeat-rich proteomes ever described. Furthermore, while no other apicomplexan has been found to possess retrotransposons, Eimeria is home to a family of chromoviruses. Analysis of Eimeria genes involved in basic biology and host-parasite interaction highlights adaptations to a relatively simple developmental life cycle and a complex array of co-expressed surface proteins involved in host cell binding.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gr.168955.113DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4199364PMC
October 2014

The evolutionary dynamics of variant antigen genes in Babesia reveal a history of genomic innovation underlying host-parasite interaction.

Nucleic Acids Res 2014 Jun 5;42(11):7113-31. Epub 2014 May 5.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Pathology, and Genetics Institute, University of Florida, PO Box 110880, 2015 SW 16th Avenue, Gainesville FL 33611-0880, USA.

Babesia spp. are tick-borne, intraerythrocytic hemoparasites that use antigenic variation to resist host immunity, through sequential modification of the parasite-derived variant erythrocyte surface antigen (VESA) expressed on the infected red blood cell surface. We identified the genomic processes driving antigenic diversity in genes encoding VESA (ves1) through comparative analysis within and between three Babesia species, (B. bigemina, B. divergens and B. bovis). Ves1 structure diverges rapidly after speciation, notably through the evolution of shortened forms (ves2) from 5' ends of canonical ves1 genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that ves1 genes are transposed between loci routinely, whereas ves2 genes are not. Similarly, analysis of sequence mosaicism shows that recombination drives variation in ves1 sequences, but less so for ves2, indicating the adoption of different mechanisms for variation of the two families. Proteomic analysis of the B. bigemina PR isolate shows that two dominant VESA1 proteins are expressed in the population, whereas numerous VESA2 proteins are co-expressed, consistent with differential transcriptional regulation of each family. Hence, VESA2 proteins are abundant and previously unrecognized elements of Babesia biology, with evolutionary dynamics consistently different to those of VESA1, suggesting that their functions are distinct.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gku322DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4066756PMC
June 2014
-->