Publications by authors named "Tanner DuCote"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Burkholderia multivorans requires species-specific GltJK for entry of a contact-dependent growth inhibition system protein.

Mol Microbiol 2021 Jul 8. Epub 2021 Jul 8.

Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA.

Interbacterial antagonism and communication are driving forces behind microbial community development. In many Gram-negative bacteria, contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems contribute to these microbial interactions. CDI systems deliver the toxic C-terminus of a large surface exposed protein to the cytoplasm of neighboring bacteria upon cell-cell contact. Termed the BcpA-CT, import of this toxic effector domain is mediated by specific, yet largely unknown receptors on the recipient cell outer and inner membranes. In this study, we demonstrated that cytoplasmic membrane proteins GltJK, components of a predicted ABC-type transporter, are required for entry of CDI system protein BcpA-2 into Burkholderia multivorans recipient cells. Consistent with current CDI models, gltJK were also required for recipient cell susceptibility to a distinct BcpA-CT that shared sequences within the predicted 'translocation domain' of BcpA-2. Strikingly, this translocation domain showed low sequence identity to the analogous region of an Escherichia coli GltJK-utilizing CDI system protein. Our results demonstrated that recipient bacteria expressing E. coli gltJK were resistant to BcpA-2-mediated interbacterial antagonism, suggesting that BcpA-2 specifically recognizes Burkholderia GltJK. Using a series of chimeric proteins, the specificity determinant was mapped to Burkholderia-specific sequences at the GltK C-terminus, providing insight into BcpA transport across the recipient cell cytoplasmic membrane.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mmi.14783DOI Listing
July 2021

Author Correction: Extensive genomic diversity among Mycobacterium marinum strains revealed by whole genome sequencing.

Sci Rep 2020 Mar 18;10(1):5246. Epub 2020 Mar 18.

Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Box 596, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24, Uppsala, Sweden.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-61218-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7078255PMC
March 2020

Extended insight into the Mycobacterium chelonae-abscessus complex through whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium salmoniphilum outbreak and Mycobacterium salmoniphilum-like strains.

Sci Rep 2019 03 14;9(1):4603. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Box 596, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24, Uppsala, Sweden.

Members of the Mycobacterium chelonae-abscessus complex (MCAC) are close to the mycobacterial ancestor and includes both human, animal and fish pathogens. We present the genomes of 14 members of this complex: the complete genomes of Mycobacterium salmoniphilum and Mycobacterium chelonae type strains, seven M. salmoniphilum isolates, and five M. salmoniphilum-like strains including strains isolated during an outbreak in an animal facility at Uppsala University. Average nucleotide identity (ANI) analysis and core gene phylogeny revealed that the M. salmoniphilum-like strains are variants of the human pathogen Mycobacterium franklinii and phylogenetically close to Mycobacterium abscessus. Our data further suggested that M. salmoniphilum separates into three branches named group I, II and III with the M. salmoniphilum type strain belonging to group II. Among predicted virulence factors, the presence of phospholipase C (plcC), which is a major virulence factor that makes M. abscessus highly cytotoxic to mouse macrophages, and that M. franklinii originally was isolated from infected humans make it plausible that the outbreak in the animal facility was caused by a M. salmoniphilum-like strain. Interestingly, M. salmoniphilum-like was isolated from tap water suggesting that it can be present in the environment. Moreover, we predicted the presence of mutational hotspots in the M. salmoniphilum isolates and 26% of these hotspots overlap with genes categorized as having roles in virulence, disease and defense. We also provide data about key genes involved in transcription and translation such as sigma factor, ribosomal protein and tRNA genes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-40922-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6418233PMC
March 2019

Extensive genomic diversity among Mycobacterium marinum strains revealed by whole genome sequencing.

Sci Rep 2018 08 13;8(1):12040. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Box 596, Biomedical Centre, SE-751 24, Uppsala, Sweden.

Mycobacterium marinum is the causative agent for the tuberculosis-like disease mycobacteriosis in fish and skin lesions in humans. Ubiquitous in its geographical distribution, M. marinum is known to occupy diverse fish as hosts. However, information about its genomic diversity is limited. Here, we provide the genome sequences for 15 M. marinum strains isolated from infected humans and fish. Comparative genomic analysis of these and four available genomes of the M. marinum strains M, E11, MB2 and Europe reveal high genomic diversity among the strains, leading to the conclusion that M. marinum should be divided into two different clusters, the "M"- and the "Aronson"-type. We suggest that these two clusters should be considered to represent two M. marinum subspecies. Our data also show that the M. marinum pan-genome for both groups is open and expanding and we provide data showing high number of mutational hotspots in M. marinum relative to other mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This high genomic diversity might be related to the ability of M. marinum to occupy different ecological niches.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-30152-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6089878PMC
August 2018