Publications by authors named "Talia Mahony"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Allergic Diseases and Immune-Mediated Food Disorders in Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol Pulmonol 2018 Sep 17;31(3):158-165. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

The prevalence and impact of allergic and immune-mediated food disorders in pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) are mostly unknown. We sought to explore the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), IgE-mediated food allergies (FAs), and other immune-mediated food disorders requiring food avoidance in patients with PANS. In addition, to further understand the extent of food restriction in this population, we investigated the empiric use of dietary measures to improve PANS symptoms. Pediatric patients in a PANS Clinic and Research Program were given surveys regarding their caregiver burdens, allergic and food-related medical history, and whether food elimination resulted in perception of improvement of PANS symptoms. A review of health records was conducted to confirm that all responses in the survey were concordant with documentation of each patient's medical chart. Sixty-nine (ages 4-20 years) of 80 subjects who fulfilled PANS criteria completed the surveys. Thirteen (18.8%) had AD, 11 (15.9%) asthma, 33 (47.8%) AR, 11 (15.9%) FA, 1 (1.4%) eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders, 1 (1.4%) food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome, 3 (4.3%) milk protein-induced proctocolitis syndrome, and 3 (4.3%) celiac disease. Thirty subjects (43.5%) avoided foods due to PANS; elimination of gluten and dairy was most common and was associated with perceived improvement of PANS symptoms (by parents). This perceived improvement was not confirmed with objective data. The prevalence of allergic and immune-mediated food disorders in PANS is similar to the general population as reported in the literature, with the exception of AR that appears to be more prevalent in our PANS cohort. More research will be required to establish whether diet or allergies influence PANS symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ped.2018.0888DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6154445PMC
September 2018

Response to editor regarding "Improvement of psychiatric symptoms in youth following resolution of sinusitis".

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2018 09 6;112:208-209. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

Pediatric Divisions of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, 700 Welch Road, Suite 125, Palo Alto, CA 94304, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.07.047DOI Listing
September 2018

Palatal Petechiae in the Absence of Group A Streptococcus in Pediatric Patients with Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Deterioration: A Cohort Study.

J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol 2017 Sep 7;27(7):660-666. Epub 2017 Apr 7.

1 Divisions of Pediatric, Department of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, Palo Alto, California.

Background: Palatal petechiae are 95% specific for streptococcal pharyngitis. Despite this, and despite prior research demonstrating that Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a common antecedent to pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS) episodes, we anecdotally observed a low rate of documented GAS in patients with PANS and palatal petechiae. This retrospective chart review was conducted to formally report the rate of palatal petechiae and concurrent GAS in a cohort of patients with PANS and investigate other etiologic factors.

Methods: The clinical notes of 112 patients seen at the Stanford PANS Clinic who met PANS research criteria were reviewed for mention of palatal petechiae. The medical records of patients who demonstrated palatal petechiae on physical examination were reviewed for signs of infection, a clinical history of trauma, and laboratory results that could indicate other causes of petechiae.

Results: Twenty-three patients had documented palatal petechiae on physical examination (ages 5-16, 13/23 [57%] male). Fifteen patients had a rapid GAS test and GAS culture in the Stanford PANS clinic, all with negative results. Evidence of recent GAS infection was found in 8/23 (32%) patients (elevated GAS titers [n = 6] or documentation of a positive rapid GAS test at another facility [n = 2]), one of whom also had potential herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. One patient had potential HSV infection and recent palatal trauma. No patients had thrombocytopenia. 14/23 (61%) of patients with palatal petechiae had no discernable cause of petechiae. 10/19 (53%) of patients had antihistone antibodies.

Conclusions: Despite the established relationship between palatal petechiae and GAS, no patient with palatal petechiae in our clinic tested positive for GAS and only 32% had evidence of recent GAS. Most did not have an identifiable cause for the palatal lesions. This finding suggests the potential for alternative causes of palatal petechiae or undetectable GAS in our patient population. The high prevalence of palatal petechiae without GAS infection suggests that the pathogenesis of PANS is multifactorial and may involve disruption or inflammation of the microvasculature. Additional research is needed to further elucidate these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cap.2016.0153DOI Listing
September 2017

Improvement of psychiatric symptoms in youth following resolution of sinusitis.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2017 Jan 31;92:38-44. Epub 2016 Oct 31.

Pediatric Divisions of Allergy, Immunology, & Rheumatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 700 Welch Road, Suite 301, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA. Electronic address:

Introduction: Accumulating evidence supports a role for inflammation in psychiatric illness, and the onset or exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms may follow non-CNS infections. Here, we provide the first detailed description of obsessive-compulsive and related psychiatric symptoms arising concurrently with sinusitis.

Methods: We reviewed the charts of 150 consecutive patients evaluated in our Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndromes clinic for documented sinusitis as defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. Sinusitis treatments, sinonasal imaging, and neuropsychiatric symptoms before, during, and after sinusitis onset were noted. Patients were included in the final review if they had a clear diagnosis of isolated sinusitis (without concurrent illness and/or immunodeficiency), and were evaluated during an episode of sinusitis.

Results: 10/150 (6.6%) patients had isolated sinusitis at the time of their neuropsychiatric deterioration. Eight patients received antibiotics to treat sinusitis, three of whom also received sinus surgery. Neuropsychiatric symptoms improved in all eight patients concurrent with resolution of sinusitis per parent report and clinician assessment. One patient did not follow through with recommended sinus surgery or antibiotics and her psychiatric symptoms persisted. One patient was lost to follow-up.

Conclusions: Improvement of psychiatric symptoms correlated with resolution of sinus disease in this retrospective study. Identification, treatment, and resolution of underlying infections, including sinusitis, may have the potential to change the trajectory of some neuropsychiatric illnesses. Randomized clinical trials are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2016.10.034DOI Listing
January 2017

An Electronic Health Record Investigation of Lenticulostriate Vasculopathy Features.

Am J Perinatol 2017 Feb 29;34(3):253-258. Epub 2016 Jul 29.

Department of Pediatrics-Neonatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California.

 Lenticulostriate vasculopathy (LSV) is characterized by linear hyperechogenicities in the basal ganglia found on the head ultrasounds of infants. We reviewed electronic health records of infants with and without LSV to investigate whether physician dictations indicated symptoms which could reflect subtle basal ganglia injury.  In a case-control study, we analyzed data from 46 infants with LSV and 127 controls. Infants were stratified between term and preterm birth. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for tone abnormalities, apnea, feeding difficulties, seizures, and movement abnormalities in the presence of LSV.  Both term and preterm infants with LSV showed elevated risks for tone abnormalities (OR: 3.6 and 2.9, respectively). Term infants with LSV showed elevated risks for hypotonia (OR: 4.3), apnea (OR: 2.9), and feeding difficulties (OR: 4.1). Preterm infants with LSV showed elevated risks for truncal hypotonia (OR: 3.9) and hyperreflexia (OR: 3.9).  Our findings provide some evidence that LSV is associated with an increased risk of early signs of abnormal development, possibly relating to signs of subtle basal ganglia injury. Historically LSV has been considered incidental. The associations identified here suggest that LSV findings are worthy of further study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0036-1585417DOI Listing
February 2017