Dr. Talha Bin Emran, PhD - Kanazawa University, Japan - Dr.

Dr. Talha Bin Emran

PhD

Kanazawa University, Japan

Dr.

Kanazawa, Ishikawa | Japan

Main Specialties: Allergy & Immunology, Biology

Additional Specialties: Natural Chemistry, Immunology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-3188-2272

Dr. Talha Bin Emran, PhD - Kanazawa University, Japan - Dr.

Dr. Talha Bin Emran

PhD

Introduction

The aim of our laboratory is to develop novel vaccine candidates against infectious diseases such as malaria, which is outstanding among domestic pharmaceutical institutes. The researches are focusing on the biology of malaria parasites, the basic researches about infectious diseases and molecular immunology, and those clinical outputs such as vaccine developments and innovative drug developments. Our long-term goal is to develop more highly effective next-generation vaccines against malaria.

Primary Affiliation: Kanazawa University, Japan - Kanazawa, Ishikawa , Japan

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Oct 2015
Kanazawa University
PhD
Vaccinology
Apr 2009 - Aug 2012
University of Chittagong
MS
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Sep 2010
University of Chittagong
BSc
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Experience

Jan 2012 - Jan 2012
BGC Trust University Bangladesh
Lecturer
Department of Pharmacy

Publications

24Publications

398Reads

29Profile Views

7PubMed Central Citations

and evaluation of pharmacological activities of (Roxb.).

Biochem Biophys Rep 2020 Sep 9;23:100772. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

Drug Discovery, GUSTO A Research Group, Chittagong, 4000, Bangladesh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrep.2020.100772DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7292905PMC
September 2020

Pharmacological studies on the antinociceptive, anxiolytic and antidepressant activity of Tinospora crispa.

Phytother Res 2020 May 19. Epub 2020 May 19.

Natural Products Research Laboratory, Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.6725DOI Listing
May 2020
2.397 Impact Factor

Genetic Variations of RAD51 and XRCC2 Genes Increase the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Bangladeshi Population.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev 2020 May 1;21(5):1445-1451. Epub 2020 May 1.

Department of Pharmacy, BGC Trust University Bangladesh, Chandanaish, Chittagong-4381, Bangladesh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.31557/APJCP.2020.21.5.1445DOI Listing
May 2020
1.500 Impact Factor

Pharmacological evidence for the use of as a medicinal plant in the management of pain and pyrexia.

Biochem Biophys Rep 2020 Mar 9;21:100715. Epub 2019 Dec 9.

Drug Discovery, GUSTO A Research Group, Chittagong, 4000, Bangladesh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrep.2019.100715DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6911962PMC
March 2020

Correlation between biofilm formation and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern toward extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)- and non-ESBL-producing uropathogenic bacteria.

J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol 2020 Jan 13. Epub 2020 Jan 13.

Department of Pharmacy, BGC Trust University Bangladesh, "BGC Biddyanagar," Kanchannagar-4381, Chandanaish, Chattogram, Bangladesh, Phone: +88-030-3356193, Fax: +88-031-2550224, Cell: +88-01819942214.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jbcpp-2019-0296DOI Listing
January 2020

A Viral-Vectored Multi-Stage Malaria Vaccine Regimen With Protective and Transmission-Blocking Efficacies.

Front Immunol 2019 15;10:2412. Epub 2019 Oct 15.

Laboratory of Vaccinology and Applied Immunology, Kanazawa University School of Pharmacy, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2019.02412DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6803381PMC
October 2019

In vivo neuroprotective, antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory potential in Swiss albino mice and in vitro antioxidant and clot lysis activities of fractionated Holigarna longifolia Roxb. bark extract.

J Complement Integr Med 2019 Sep 17;17(1). Epub 2019 Sep 17.

Department of Pharmacy, BGC Trust University Bangladesh, Chattogram-4381, Bangladesh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jcim-2019-0102DOI Listing
September 2019
6 Reads

Down-selecting circumsporozoite protein-based malaria vaccine: A comparison of malaria sporozoite challenge model.

Parasite Immunol 2019 05;41(5):e12624

Laboratory of Vaccinology and Applied Immunology, Kanazawa University School of Pharmacy, Kanazawa, Japan.

Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) is the main target antigen in development of pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccines. To evaluate PfCSP vaccines in animal models, challenge by intravenous sporozoite injection is preferentially used. However, in clinical trials, vaccinated human volunteers are exposed to the bites of malaria-infected mosquitoes. In this study, we down-selected Escherichia coli-produced full-length PfCSP (PfCSP-F), and its three truncated PfCSPs based on their abilities to elicit immune response and protection in mice against two challenge models. We showed that immunization with three-dose of PfCSP-F elicited high anti-PfCSP antibody titers and 100% protection against the bites of infected mosquitoes. Meanwhile, three-dose truncated PfCSP induced 60%-70% protection after immunization with each truncated PfCSP. Heterologous prime-boost immunization regimen with adenovirus-PfCSP-F and R32LR greatly induced complete protection against intravenous sporozoite injection. "Our results suggest that Abs to both anti-repeat and anti-nonrepeat regions induced by PfCSP-F are required to confer complete protection against challenge by the bites of infected mosquitoes, whereas anti-repeat Abs play an important role in protection against intravenous sporozoite injection. Our findings provide a potential clinical application that PfCSP-F vaccine induces potent Abs capable of neutralizing sporozoites in the dermis inoculated by infected mosquitoes and subsequently sporozoites in the blood circulation.". This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pim.12624DOI Listing
May 2019
17 Reads
2.836 Impact Factor

Anopheline antiplatelet protein from mosquito saliva regulates blood feeding behavior.

Sci Rep 2019 02 28;9(1):3129. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Laboratory of Vaccinology and Applied Immunology, Kanazawa University School of Pharmacy, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa, 920-1192, Japan.

The saliva of hematophagous arthropods is enriched with a complex mixture of antihemostatic molecules, the biological functions of which are largely unknown. Anopheline antiplatelet protein (AAPP) from malaria vector mosquito exhibits strong antiplatelet activity when bound directly to host collagen by its C-terminus and through its N-terminus with Ca-binding activity. To investigate the biological functions of AAPP in blood feeding behavior and malaria transmission, we generated transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquito lines expressing anti-AAPP antibody single-chain fragment (scFv) in their salivary glands. The AAPP-specific collagen-binding activity was completely abolished by AAPP-scFv complex formation in the saliva. Probing and prediuresis time, feeding success, blood meal size, and fecundity, which are all fitness characteristics, were significantly reduced in the transgenic mosquitoes. However, oocysts number in these mosquitoes were not significantly reduced following blood meal intake from Plasmodium berghei-infected mice. These results show that although AAPP plays an important role in mosquito blood feeding, its neutralizing activity did not affect sporogonic development in our laboratory model, but its high fitness cost would pose a survival risk for parasite-infected mosquitoes in nature.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-39960-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6395645PMC
February 2019
34 Reads
5.078 Impact Factor

Baculovirus-Induced Fast-Acting Innate Immunity Kills Liver-Stage .

J Immunol 2018 10 12;201(8):2441-2451. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Laboratory of Vaccinology and Applied Immunology, Kanazawa University School of Pharmacy, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan;

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1800908DOI Listing
October 2018
101 Reads
4.922 Impact Factor

Antithrombotic Effects of Five Organic Extracts of Bangladeshi Plants In Vitro and Mechanisms in In Silico Models.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2015 17;2015:782742. Epub 2015 May 17.

Department of Pharmacy, BGC Trust University, Chittagong 4000, Bangladesh.

This research was carried out to investigate the thrombolytic effects of the methanolic extracts of five Bangladeshi plants. Phytochemical metabolites of those plants have been identified to elucidate whether the plant-derived metabolites are linked with the thrombolytic effects. Potential computer aided models were adopted in this study to find out a structure-function correlation between the phytochemical constituents and thrombolytic effects using the secondary metabolites as ligands and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) as receptor for the best fit ligand-receptor interaction.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/782742DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4449917PMC
June 2015
29 Reads
2.170 Impact Factor

Molecular docking and inhibition studies on the interactions of Bacopa monnieri's potent phytochemicals against pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus.

Daru 2015 Apr 17;23:26. Epub 2015 Apr 17.

Department of Pharmacy, BGC Trust University Bangladesh, Chittagong, 4000, Bangladesh.

Background: Bacopa monnieri Linn. (Plantaginaceae), a well-known medicinal plant, is widely used in traditional medicine system. It has long been used in gastrointestinal discomfort, skin diseases, epilepsy and analgesia. This research investigated the in vitro antimicrobial activity of Bacopa monnieri leaf extract against Staphylococcus aureus and the interaction of possible compounds involved in this antimicrobial action.

Methods: Non-edible plant parts were extracted with ethanol and evaporated in vacuo to obtain the crude extract. A zone of inhibition studies and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of plant extracts were evaluated against clinical isolates by the microbroth dilution method. Docking study was performed to analyze and identify the interactions of possible antimicrobial compounds of Bacopa monnieri in the active site of penicillin binding protein and DNA gyrase through GOLD 4.12 software.

Results: A zone of inhibition studies showed significant (p?
Conclusions: Bacopa monnieri extract and its compound luteolin have a significant antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Molecular binding interaction of an in silico data demonstrated that luteolin has more specificity towards the DNA gyrase binding site and could be a potent antimicrobial compound.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40199-015-0106-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4405885PMC
April 2015
48 Reads
2.667 Impact Factor

Molecular docking and analgesic studies of Erythrina variegata׳s derived phytochemicals with COX enzymes.

Bioinformation 2014 30;10(10):630-6. Epub 2014 Oct 30.

Department of Pharmacy, BGC Trust University Bangladesh, Chittagong-4000, Bangladesh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6026/97320630010630DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4248345PMC
December 2014
14 Reads

Molecular docking of fisetin with AD associated AChE, ABAD and BACE1 proteins.

Bioinformation 2014 30;10(9):562-8. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

Department of Pharmacy, BGC Trust University Bangladesh, Chittagong-4000, Bangladesh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6026/97320630010562DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4209364PMC
October 2014
14 Reads
5 Citations

An in vitro antibacterial and antifungal effects of cadmium(II) complexes of hexamethyltetraazacyclotetradecadiene and isomers of its saturated analogue.

Asian Pac J Trop Med 2014 Sep;7S1:S534-9

BGC Trust University Bangladesh, Chittagong, Bangladesh.

Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial and antifungal effects of cadmium(II) complexes with hexamethyltetraazacyclotetradecadiene ligands.

Methods: Five coordinated square pyramidal cadmium(II) complexes and six coordinated square octahedral cadmium(II) complexes have been synthesized by interaction of 5,7,7,12,14,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-4,11-diene (denoted by L.2HClO4) and C-chiral isomers of its saturated analogue (denoted by 'teta' and 'tetb') with different salts of Cd(2+) ion [e.g. CdI2, Cd(NO3)2·6H2O, CdCl2·2H2O and Cd(ClO4)2·6H2O] in methanolic solution. Complexes of the ligands were investigated for antibacterial activity by disc diffusion method and antifungal effect by poisoned food technique.

Results: The newly synthesized cadmium(II) complexes of the ligands were screened as potential antimicrobial agent against a number of medically important bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae and Escherichia coli) and against two fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus aculeatus). The growth inhibiting activity of the ligands and complexes against bacteria and fungi were compared with the standard antibiotic ampicillin and commercially important antifungal agent, griseofulvin respectively. Among them some of the macrocyclic complexes were found to be more fungitoxic and antibacterial than the reference antifungal drug griseofulvin and antibacterial drug ampicillin respectively.

Conclusions: Hexamethyltetraazacyclotetradecadiene ligands and its complexes could be considered as very potential antibacterial and antifungal agent with further investigation.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1995-7645(14)60286-8DOI Listing
September 2014
25 Reads
1.634 Impact Factor

Phytopharmacological evaluation of ethanol extract of Sida cordifolia L. roots.

Asian Pac J Trop Biomed 2014 Jan;4(1):18-24

Department of Pharmacy, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka-1342, Bangladesh. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2221-1691(14)60202-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3819490PMC
January 2014
27 Reads
2 Citations

Effects of organic extracts of six Bangladeshi plants on in vitro thrombolysis and cytotoxicity.

BMC Complement Altern Med 2013 Jan 30;13:25. Epub 2013 Jan 30.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, 4331, Bangladesh.

Background: Thrombus formed in blood vessels lead to atherothrombotic diseases such as myocardial or cerebral infarction. Thrombolytic agents are used to dissolve the already formed clots in the blood vessels; however, these drugs sometimes cause serious and fatal consequences. Herbal preparations have been used since ancient times for the treatment of several diseases although they show little toxicity in some cases. Aqueous extracts of herbs used in thrombolysis have been reported before with cytotoxic data, however, the organic extracts of herbs have not been documented. This study aims to investigate whether organic extracts possess thrombolytic properties with minimal or no toxicity.

Methods: An in vitro thrombolytic model was used to check the clot lysis effect of six Bangladeshi herbal extracts viz., Ageratum conyzoides L., Clausena suffruticosa, Leea indica (Burm.f.) Merr., Leucas aspera Willd., Senna sophera L. Roxb., and Solanum torvum Swartz. using streptokinase as a positive control and water as a negative control. Briefly, venous blood drawn from twenty healthy volunteers was allowed to form clots which were weighed and treated with the test plant materials to disrupt the clots. Weight of clot after and before treatment provided a percentage of clot lysis. Cytotoxicity was screened by brine shrimp lethality bioassay using vincristine sulfate as positive control.

Results: Using an in vitro thrombolytic model, Ageratum conyzoides, Clausena suffruticosa, Leea indica, Leucas aspera, Senna sophera and Solanum torvum showed 18.12 ± 2.34%, 48.9 ± 2.44%, 39.30 ± 0.96%, 37.32 ± 2.00%, 31.61 ± 2.97% and 31.51 ± 0.57% and clot lysis respectively. Among the herbs studied Clausena suffruticosa, Leea indica and Leucas aspera showed very significant (p < 0.0001) percentage (%) of clot lysis compared to reference drug streptokinase (75.00 ± 3.04%). In brine shrimp cytotoxic assay, the extracts Ageratum conyzoides, Clausena suffruticosa, Leea indica, Leucas aspera, Senna sophera and Solanum torvum showed LC50 values 508.86 ± 6.62,41.16 ± 1.26, 2.65 ± 0.16, 181.67 ± 1.65, 233.37 ± 7.74 and 478.40 ± 3.23 ?g/ml, respectively, with reference to vincristine sulfate (LC50 0.76 ± 0.04).

Conclusion: Through our study it was found that Clausena suffruticosa, Leea indica and Leucas aspera possessed effective thrombolytic properties whereas Senna sophera and Solanum torvum showed moderate to mild thrombolytic effects while Ageratum conyzoides showed no significant effect. No extract was found cytoxic compared to positive control. Clausena suffruticosa, Leea indica and Leucas aspera could be incorporated as a thrombolytic agent with in vivo effects to improve the atherothrombotic patients. However, Clausena suffruticosa could be the best one to use in this purpose.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-13-25DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3567938PMC
January 2013
32 Reads
2.240 Impact Factor

Top co-authors

Ashekul Islam
Ashekul Islam

University of Chittagong

6
Raju Dash
Raju Dash

BGC Trust University Bangladesh

6
Mitsuhiro Iyori
Mitsuhiro Iyori

Hokkaido University Graduate School of Dental Medicine

5
Fitri Amelia
Fitri Amelia

Laboratory of Vaccinology and Applied Immunology

5
Daisuke S Yamamoto
Daisuke S Yamamoto

Graduate School of Science and Technology

5
Yenni Yusuf
Yenni Yusuf

Laboratory of Vaccinology and Applied Immunology

5
Shigeto Yoshida
Shigeto Yoshida

Jichi Medical University

5
Arkajyoti Paul
Arkajyoti Paul

BGC Trust University

4
Md Atiar Rahman
Md Atiar Rahman

University of Chittagong

4

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