Publications by authors named "Talha Ali Chohan"

3 Publications

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First Record of Chaetomium globosum Causing Leaf Spot of Pomegranate in Pakistan.

Plant Dis 2021 Mar 31. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Lahore, Pakistan;

Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is a non-climacteric and a favorite fruit of tropical, sub-tropical and arid regions of the world. During a survey in autumn 2019, leaf lesions were observed on plants (cv. Kandhari) in different orchards of Muzaffargarh (30°4'27.7572″ N, 71°11'4.7544″ E), a major pomegranate-producing region in Punjab Province. Disease incidence ranged from 17 to 20%. Leaf lesions were initially small (1 to 3 mm in diameter), round, purple or reddish-brown, scattered spots. At later stages, spots increased in size and the centers of mature lesions became dark red or black with fungal sporulation. To isolate the pathogen, samples of leaf (5 × 5 mm) were cut from the junction of diseased and healthy tissue, surface disinfected in 75% alcohol for 30 s, sterilized with 6% sodium hypochlorite for 3 min, washed with sterile distilled water three times, air dried in laminar flow hood, and cultured on potato dextrose agar (PDA). After one week of incubation at 25 ± 2°C with a 12-h photoperiod, fungal colonies developed, which were initially white and became pale yellow with olivaceous green mycelium after 20 days. On PDA, ascomata were olivaceous green, with a papillate ostiole, globose or ovoidal to obovoidal (155 to 220 × 120 to 240 µm, n=50). Terminal and lateral setae were abundant, brown, and tapering toward the tips (4 to 6 µm, n=50). Asci were greenish and lemon-shaped (6 to 8 × 9 to 13.5 µm, n=50). Ascospores were limoniform and olivaceous gray-brown (10 to 11.5 × 7 to 9 µm, n=50). These morphological characteristics were consistent with the morphology of Chaetomium globosum (Lan et al. 2011; Wang et al. 2016). Genomic DNA was extracted from two isolates and identification of the pathogen was confirmed by amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) and the partial translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) gene using ITS1/ITS4 (White et al. 1999) and EF1-983F/EF1-2218R primers (Wang et al. 2016), respectively. The sequences of the PCR products were deposited in GenBank with accession numbers MW522514, MW522352 (ITS), and MW530423, MW530424 (TEF1). BLAST results of the obtained sequences of the ITS and TEF1 genes revealed 100% (513/513 bp) and 99.78% (927/929 bp) similarity with those of C. globosum in GenBank (ITS: KX834823 and KT898637, and TEF1: MG812564 and KC485028). To confirm pathogenicity, inoculum was prepared by harvesting conidia from 10-day-old culture grown in PDA. The surface-disinfected (70% ethyl alcohol, 30 s) leaves of ten 1-year-old seedlings (cv. Kandhari) were sprayed with a spore suspension (1×106 conidia/ml). Leaves of ten seedlings sprayed with sterile distilled water served as controls. All seedlings were covered with plastic bags and placed in a greenhouse at 26°C with 12 h photoperiod. After eight days, symptoms on inoculated leaves were similar to those observed in the orchards; no symptoms were observed on controls. The fungus was reisolated from all symptomatic tissues. C. globosum has been reported on Punica granatum (Guo et al. 2015), Cannabis sativa (Chaffin et al. 2020) and Brassica oleracea (Zhu et al. 2020). This is the first report of C. globosum causing leaf spot on pomegranate in Pakistan. This finding suggests a potential threat to pomegranate production in Pakistan and further studies should focus on effective prevention and control practices of this disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-01-21-0200-PDNDOI Listing
March 2021

Phytochemical profiling, antioxidant and antiproliferation potential of var.: Experimental analysis and in-silico validation.

Saudi J Biol Sci 2020 Nov 6;27(11):3025-3034. Epub 2020 Aug 6.

Laboratory of Natural Products and Computational Chemistry, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan.

This study was aimed to investigate the anticancer potential of () using an exquisite combination of phytopharmacological and advanced computational techniques. The chloroform fraction (Em-C) of methanol extract showed the highest antioxidant activity (IC: 6.41 ± 0.99 µg/ml) among all studied fractions. Likewise, Em-C also showed significant cytotoxicity (IC: 11.2 ± 0.8 µg/ml) when compared with that of standard compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (IC: 4.22 ± 0.6 µg/ml) against hepatocarcinoma cell line (HepG2). However, in a human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa), Em-C demonstrated a non-significant difference in cytotoxicity (22.1 ± 0.8 µg/ml) when compared with that of 5-FU (IC: 6.87 ± 0.5 µg/ml). Furthermore, Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the suppression of HepG2 cells was the consequence of a tremendous decrease in CDK2 and E2F1 protein expression. The GC-MS analysis of Em-C revealed the unique presence of cyclobarbital (CBT) and benzodioxole derivative (BAN) as major constituents. Furthermore, molecular docking of compounds BAN, CBT, and MBT into the binding site of different molecular targets i.e. cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), thymidylate synthase (TS), caspase 3, BCL2 and topoisomerase II was carried out. Compounds BAN and CBT have demonstrated remarkable binding affinity towards CDK2 and thymidylate synthase, respectively. Molecular dynamic simulation studies have further confirmed the finding of docking analysis, suggesting that CDK2 and TS can act as an attractive molecular target for BAN and CBT, respectively. It can be concluded that these phytoconstituents (BAN and CBT) may likely be responsible for anti-invasive activity against HepG2 cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sjbs.2020.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7569141PMC
November 2020

Repellency, Toxicity, Gene Expression Profiling and In Silico Studies to Explore Insecticidal Potential of Essential Oil against .

Toxins (Basel) 2018 Oct 25;10(11). Epub 2018 Oct 25.

School of Plant Protection, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, China.

In the current study, deterrent assay, contact bioassay, lethal concentration (LC) analysis and gene expression analysis were performed to reveal the repellent or insecticidal potential of oil against . oil demonstrated an excellent deterrence index (0.8) at 2 g/L after 48 h. The oil demonstrated a pronounced contact mortality rate (72%) at a dose of 4 g/L after 24 h. Probit analysis was performed to estimate LC-values of oil (40%) against (LC = 0.115 g/L and LC = 0.37 g/L respectively) after 24 h. Furthermore, to probe changes in gene expression due to oil contact in , the expression of , genes were examined at doses of LC and LC. Four out of the five selected genes-, and -showed upregulation at LC, whereas, gene showed maximum upregulation expression at LC. Finally, the major components of oil (terpinen-4-ol) were docked and MD simulated into the related proteins of the selected genes to explore ligand⁻protein modes of interactions and changes in gene expression. The results show that oil has remarkable insecticidal and deterrent effects and also has the ability to affect the reproduction and development in by binding to proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/toxins10110425DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6266121PMC
October 2018