Publications by authors named "Takayuki Okano-Uchida"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Two Distinct E2F Transcriptional Modules Drive Cell Cycles and Differentiation.

Cell Rep 2019 06 23;27(12):3547-3560.e5. Epub 2019 May 23.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. Electronic address:

Orchestrating cell-cycle-dependent mRNA oscillations is critical to cell proliferation in multicellular organisms. Even though our understanding of cell-cycle-regulated transcription has improved significantly over the last three decades, the mechanisms remain untested in vivo. Unbiased transcriptomic profiling of G, G-S, and S-G-M sorted cells from FUCCI mouse embryos suggested a central role for E2Fs in the control of cell-cycle-dependent gene expression. The analysis of gene expression and E2F-tagged knockin mice with tissue imaging and deep-learning tools suggested that post-transcriptional mechanisms universally coordinate the nuclear accumulation of E2F activators (E2F3A) and canonical (E2F4) and atypical (E2F8) repressors during the cell cycle in vivo. In summary, we mapped the spatiotemporal expression of sentinel E2F activators and canonical and atypical repressors at the single-cell level in vivo and propose that two distinct E2F modules relay the control of gene expression in cells actively cycling (E2F3A-8-4) and exiting the cycle (E2F3A-4) during mammalian development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2019.05.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6673649PMC
June 2019

Endoreduplication of the mouse genome in the absence of ORC1.

Genes Dev 2018 07;32(13-14):978-990

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.

The largest subunit of the origin recognition complex (ORC1) is essential for assembly of the prereplicative complex, firing of DNA replication origins, and faithful duplication of the genome. Here, we generated knock-in mice with sites flanking exons encoding the critical ATPase domain of ORC1. Global or tissue-specific ablation of ORC1 function in mouse embryo fibroblasts and fetal and adult diploid tissues blocked DNA replication, cell lineage expansion, and organ development. Remarkably, ablation in extraembryonic trophoblasts and hepatocytes, two polyploid cell types in mice, failed to impede genome endoreduplication and organ development and function. Thus, ORC1 in mice is essential for mitotic cell divisions but dispensable for endoreduplication. We propose that DNA replication of mammalian polyploid genomes uses a distinct ORC1-independent mechanism.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gad.311910.118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6075035PMC
July 2018

Cerebellar neural stem cells differentiate into two distinct types of astrocytes in response to CNTF and BMP2.

Neurosci Lett 2013 Sep 26;552:15-20. Epub 2013 Jul 26.

Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511, Japan.

Neural stem cells (NSCs) are present in postnatal murine cerebellum. The detailed characteristics of these NSCs have never been reported. This study isolated NSC-like cells from postnatal mouse cerebellum. These cells proliferated in response to epidermal growth factor, expressed various NSC markers, and had the ability to self-renew. Neurosphere assays revealed that these cells could differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, indicating multipotency as NSCs. Although possessing multipotency, most of these cells differentiated into astrocytes spontaneously in vitro. Both ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) facilitated expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and some other characteristics of mature astrocytes by these cells. However, the shape and expression of glutamine transporter GLT-1 of GFAP(+) cells generated in the presence of CNTF or BMP2 differed significantly, suggesting that CNTF and BMP2 induced differentiation of these NSCs into two distinct types of astrocytes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2013.07.021DOI Listing
September 2013

CD44-positive cells are candidates for astrocyte precursor cells in developing mouse cerebellum.

Cerebellum 2012 Mar;11(1):181-93

Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511, Japan.

Neural stem cells are generally considered to be committed to becoming precursor cells before terminally differentiating into either neurons or glial cells during neural development. Neuronal and oligodendrocyte precursor cells have been identified in several areas in the murine central nervous system. The presence of astrocyte precursor cells (APCs) is not so well understood. The present study provides several lines of evidence that CD44-positive cells are APCs in the early postnatal mouse cerebellum. In developing mouse cerebellum, CD44-positive cells, mostly located in the white matter, were positive for the markers of the astrocyte lineage, but negative for the markers of mature astrocytes. CD44-positive cells were purified from postnatal cerebellum by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and characterized in vitro. In the absence of any signaling molecule, many cells died by apoptosis. The surviving cells gradually expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein, a marker for mature astrocytes, indicating that differentiation into mature astrocytes is the default program for these cells. The cells produced no neurospheres nor neurons nor oligodendrocytes under any condition examined, indicating these cells are not neural stem cells. Leukemia inhibitory factor greatly promoted astrocytic differentiation of CD44-positive cells, whereas bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) did not. Fibroblast growth factor-2 was a potent mitogen for these cells, but was insufficient for survival. BMP4 inhibited activation of caspase-3 and greatly promoted survival, suggesting a novel role for BMP4 in the control of development of astrocytes in cerebellum. We isolated and characterized only CD44 strongly positive large cells and discarded small and/or CD44 weakly positive cells in this study. Further studies are necessary to characterize these cells to help determine whether CD44 is a selective and specific marker for APCs in the developing mouse cerebellum. In conclusion, we succeeded in preparing APC candidates from developing mouse cerebellum, characterized them in vitro, and found that BMPs are survival factors for these cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12311-011-0294-xDOI Listing
March 2012

Suppression of thyroid hormone receptor-mediated transcription and disruption of thyroid hormone-induced cerebellar morphogenesis by the polybrominated biphenyl mixture, BP-6.

Neurotoxicology 2011 Aug 17;32(4):400-9. Epub 2011 Mar 17.

Department of Integrative Physiology, Division of Biological Regulations, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, Japan.

Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) are polyhalogenated, bioaccumulative flame retardant chemicals, which have been used in a variety of consumer and household products. They were accidentally introduced into the food chain in Michigan in 1973 and have remained a source of health concern. Studies have shown that exposure to PBB may cause adverse neurotoxic effects. We therefore examined the effects of BP-6, a PBB mixture, on thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-mediated transcription, on TH-induced Purkinje cell dendritogenesis, and on TH-induced cerebellar granule cell neurite extension. Our study shows that BP-6 suppressed TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells. Mammalian two-hybrid studies revealed that BP-6 did not inhibit coactivator binding to TR nor did it recruit corepressors to TR. Further examination using the liquid chemiluminescent DNA pull down assay revealed partial dissociation of TR from TH response element (TRE). In primary rat cerebellar culture, BP-6 significantly suppressed TH-induced dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells, and in reaggregate rat granule cell culture, impaired TH-induced neurite extension of granule cells. Taken together, our results indicate that BP-6 may disrupt TH homeostasis and consequently impair normal neuronal development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2011.02.008DOI Listing
August 2011

Cerebellar granule cell precursors can differentiate into astroglial cells.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2004 Feb 26;101(5):1211-6. Epub 2004 Jan 26.

Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showamachi, Maebashi 371-8511, Japan.

During CNS development, multipotent neural stem cells give rise first to various kinds of specified precursor cells, which proliferate extensively before terminally differentiating into either neurons or glial cells. It is still not clear, however, whether the specified precursor cells are irreversibly determined to differentiate into their particular cell types. In this study, we show that isolated mouse cerebellar granule cell precursors from the outermost, proliferative zone of the external germinal layer can differentiate into astroglial cells when exposed to sonic hedgehog (Shh) and bone morphogenetic proteins. These induced cells initially expressed both glial fibrillary acidic protein and neuronal markers, but they then lost their neuronal markers and acquired S100-beta, a marker of differentiated astroglial cells. These results indicate that at least some granule cell precursors are not irreversibly committed to neuronal development but can be induced to differentiate into astroglial cells by appropriate extracellular signals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0307972100DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC337032PMC
February 2004

Distinct regulators for Plk1 activation in starfish meiotic and early embryonic cycles.

EMBO J 2003 Oct;22(20):5633-42

Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Biology, Graduate School of Bioscience, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226-8501, Japan.

The Polo-like kinase, Plk, has multiple roles in regulating mitosis. In particular, Plk1 has been postulated to function as a trigger kinase that phosphorylates and activates Cdc25C prior to the activation of cyclin B-Cdc2 and thereby initiates its activation. However, the upstream regulation of Plk1 activation remains unclear. Here we have studied the interplay between Plk1 and Cdc2 through meiotic and early embryonic cycles in starfish. Distinct kinases, cyclin B-Cdc2, MAPK along with cyclin B- and/or cyclin A-Cdc2 and cyclin A-Cdc2, were unique upstream regulators for Plk1 activation at meiosis I, meiosis II and embryonic M-phase, respectively, indicating that Plk1 is not the trigger kinase at meiotic reinitiation. When Plk1 was required for cyclin B-Cdc2 activation, the action of Plk1 was mediated primarily through suppression of Myt1 rather than through activation of Cdc25. We propose that Plk1 can be activated by either cyclin A- or cyclin B-Cdc2, and its primary target is Myt1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/emboj/cdg535DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC213789PMC
October 2003