Publications by authors named "Takaharu Miyauchi"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Superb microvascular imaging (SMI) findings of splenic artery pseudoaneurysm: a report of two cases.

J Med Ultrason (2001) 2018 Jul 30;45(3):515-523. Epub 2018 Jan 30.

Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Akita Red Cross Hospital, Akita, Japan.

Splenic artery pseudoaneurysm (SAPA) is a relatively infrequently encountered but clinically important vascular change, because it carries a high risk of rupture that warrants prompt treatment regardless of its size. Thus, sufficient knowledge is indispensable when seeing chronic pancreatitis patients or post-traumatic patients. Here, we report two such cases. The first case was a 52-year-old woman known to have chronic pancreatitis who presented with hematemesis and hemodynamic instability in which X-ray computed tomography (CT) and color Doppler sonography (CDS) had difficulty visualizing slow blood flow in SAPA, but superb microvascular imaging (SMI) clearly demonstrated the slow blood flow in SAPA, prompting our therapeutic decision to perform rapid embolization. The second case was a 51-year-old woman with post-traumatic SAPA in which 3D SMI enabled us to understand more clearly the topographic relationship between multiple SAPAs as compared with conventional US, leading to a decision to provide immediate surgical treatment. SMI was thought to provide a new insight into the US diagnosis of SAPA. When examining patients suspected of having a SAPA, SMI is an indispensable diagnostic tool at present.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10396-018-0858-1DOI Listing
July 2018

Sonographic findings in two cases of lymphangioma of the mesocolon in adults.

J Clin Ultrasound 2018 Jan 25;46(1):78-81. Epub 2017 Apr 25.

Department of Radiology, Akita Red Cross Hospital, 222-1 Kamikitade Saruta, Akita-shi, Akita, 010-1495, Japan.

Lymphangioma of the mesocolon is very rare. We report two cases of surgically resected and histologically proven mesocolic lymphangioma in adults. In both cases, ultrasound revealed a large cystic mass with multiple thin septa in the lower abdomen. A peculiar finding was the large craniocaudal sliding movement of the mass synchronized with the patient's respiration, which was a clue to the diagnosis of mesenteric lymphangioma. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 46:78-81, 2018.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcu.22488DOI Listing
January 2018

Successful treatment continuation with a single mild partial splenic embolization for thrombocytopenia caused by oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for advanced colon cancer.

Indian J Gastroenterol 2016 May 27;35(3):245-7. Epub 2016 May 27.

Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, 207, Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa, 903-0215, Japan.

We report the case of a patient with advanced colon cancer receiving oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy that was able to continue systemic chemotherapy by performing mild partial splenic embolization (PSE) for thrombocytopenia caused by splenomegaly due to oxaliplatin. Mild PSE may be useful for thrombocytopenia due to splenomegaly in cancer patients because it provides more treatment opportunities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12664-016-0665-9DOI Listing
May 2016

Transient disappearance of microbleeds in the subacute period based on T2*-weighted gradient echo imaging in traumatic brain injury.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2016 07 22;158(7):1247-50. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

Department of Neurosurgery, Akita Red Cross Hospital, 222-1 Nawashirosawa, Saruta, Kamikitate, Akita, 010-1495, Japan.

We report three cases of traumatic microbleeds evaluated by sequential observation. Hypo-intensities on T2* gradient echo imaging (T2*GEI) appeared just 2-3 h after the injury (the hyper-acute period). However, these hypo-intensities on T2*GEI disappeared or became obscure 2-6 days after the injury (the subacute period). A follow-up MRI again revealed clear hypo-intensities on T2*GEI 1-3 months after the injury (the chronic period). Our cases indicate that hypo-intensities on T2*GEI might change dynamically from the hyper-acute to the chronic period. The differences of susceptibility effects by hematoma age might be the cause of this dynamic change.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-016-2805-5DOI Listing
July 2016

Concurrent use of strontium-89 with external beam radiotherapy for multiple bone metastases: early experience.

Ann Nucl Med 2015 Dec 13;29(10):848-53. Epub 2015 Aug 13.

Department of Radiology, Ryukyus University of Medicine, 207, Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa, 903-0215, Japan.

Objective: The aim of the present study was to consider the safety and efficacy of concurrent use of strontium-89 (Sr-89) with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for multiple bone metastases, including lesions that require urgent therapy.

Methods: A retrospective review was performed of a consecutive series of patients who received Sr-89 for multiple bone metastases. Forty-five patients with multiple bone metastases received Sr-89 injection. Since 17 of the 45 patients had osteolytic bone lesions requiring emergent EBRT, they underwent concurrent use of Sr-89 with EBRT (concurrent group). The remaining 28 patients, none of whom had osteolytic lesions requiring urgent EBRT, were given Sr-89 injection only (singularity group). The injection of Sr-89 was to be given during EBRT, or on the day before the first day of EBRT. The dose of EBRT was 30 Gy in 10 fractions or 40 Gy in 20 fractions. Adverse events were evaluated according to hematological toxicity as measured by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (V4.0). To assess efficacy, we checked changes in the pain scale and analgesic drug dosages, and the presence or absence of serious complications from bone metastases.

Results: Fifteen of 17 patients (88.2%) in the concurrent group and 17 of 28 patients (60.7%) in the singularity group reported bone pain relief. A statistically significant difference was found between the two groups, and severe complications (spinal cord compression and pathological fracture) from bone metastases could be prevented in all patients in the concurrent group. Severe hematological toxicity (grade 3 or higher) was not observed in the two groups. There was no statistical difference between the two groups. No one required additional intervention. The adverse events were tolerable.

Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that concurrent use of Sr-89 with EBRT for multiple bone metastases can be performed safely if it is carried out with care, and that it may be an effective therapy in cases requiring emergency treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12149-015-1010-6DOI Listing
December 2015

Tumor regression of multiple bone metastases from breast cancer after administration of strontium-89 chloride (Metastron).

Acta Radiol Short Rep 2014 May 10;3(4):2047981613493412. Epub 2014 May 10.

Department of Radiology, Akita University of Medicine, Akita, Japan.

We report a case of tumor regression of multiple bone metastases from breast carcinoma after administration of strontium-89 chloride. This case suggests that strontium-89 chloride can not only relieve bone metastases pain not responsive to analgesics, but may also have a tumoricidal effect on bone metastases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2047981613493412DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4184432PMC
May 2014

Isolated hepatic metastasis with hepatic venous invasion and tumor thrombus in right atrium.

J Med Ultrason (2001) 2012 Jul 13;39(3):193-6. Epub 2012 Mar 13.

Center of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Akita Red Cross Hospital, Akita, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10396-012-0356-9DOI Listing
July 2012

[A case of fasciitis localized in the calf muscles associated with Edwardsiella tarda sepsis].

Rinsho Shinkeigaku 2011 Sep;51(9):694-8

Department of Neurology, Akita Red Cross Hospital.

A 49-year-old man presented with fever and pain, redness, swelling, and difficulty in walking. The serum C-reactive protein (CRP), creatin kinase (CK), and endotoxin levels were elevated. A blood culture revealed Edwardsiella tarda(E. tarda). Computed tomography (CT) showed subfascial and subcutaneous low-density areas in the lower legs, suggesting focal abscesses and edema. The patient was likely to have necrotizing fasciitis or cellulitis. He was successfully treated with several antibiotics and discharged after 43 days. Because E. tarda causes sepsis and fulminating necrotizing fasciitis with a high mortality rate in patients with an underlying illness, it should be considered a potentially important pathogen. The lack of an underlying illness may be a factor for a good outcome in this case.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5692/clinicalneurol.51.694DOI Listing
September 2011

Painful hepatic hemangioma: report of a case with an emphasis on sonographic findings.

J Med Ultrason (2001) 2010 Jan 28;37(1):21-5. Epub 2009 Oct 28.

Department of Pathology, Akita Red Cross Hospital, 222-1 Naeshirozawa, Saruta, Kamikitade, Akita, 010-1495, Japan.

Hepatic hemangiomas are usually asymptomatic and very rarely produce abdominal symptoms. We report a painful 10 × 9 cm hemangioma situated at the hepatic surface of segment 6. The lesion showed a heterogeneous internal structure, composed irregularly of hyperechoic and hypoechoic areas, and it also showed weak posterior echo enhancement. Contrast-enhanced US showed the so-called fill-in pattern, leading to the diagnosis of hepatic hemangioma. The patient's abdomen showed no other abnormal findings, which stressed the relationship between the hemangioma and the patient's symptoms. When the diagnosis of hepatic hemangioma is conclusive, surgical therapy is indicated only in patients with severe symptoms. Our patient was considered to be a candidate for enucleation of the lesion. Histopathologically, the lesion included no areas of hemorrhage or necrosis, and the patient's abdominal pain was likely due to distension of the liver capsule. After surgery, the patient was completely free of symptoms, and enucleation was considered to be appropriate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10396-009-0242-2DOI Listing
January 2010

[Case of infected subdural hematoma diagnosed by diffusion-weighted imaging].

Brain Nerve 2009 Mar;61(3):319-23

Department of Neurosurgery, Akita Red Cross Hospital, 222-1 Nawashirosawa, Saruta, Kamikitate, Akita 010-1495, Japan.

An 80-year-old man who had undergone total gastrectomy and splenectomy for gastric cancer 13 years ago presented with headache, drowsiness, and high fever 1 month after a traffic accident. Brain CT scans revealed bilateral subdural fluid collections. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) showed mixed high and low signal intensities in the left subdural fluid, and contrast-enhanced MR imaging revealed capsule enhancement of the left subdural fluid collection. The patient was diagnosed with left subdural empyema, and 2 burr-holes were drilled for drainage and irrigation. Operative findings revealed a neomembrane underneath the dura mater. Old hematoma and yellowish-white purulent fluid were present within the neomembrane. This confirmed the diagnosis of infected subdural hematoma (ISH). Abscess culture results were positive for Escherichia coli. The patient's symptoms resolved postoperatively with subsequent antibiotic therapy. However, 4 months after the operation, he suddenly died of severe sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation following cholecystitis, which was possibly associated with splenectomy. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of an unusual case of ISH have been discussed. We emphasize that DWI and enhanced MR imaging may be useful for diagnosing ISH, and serial DWI evaluations may help in monitoring the therapeutic response in ISH.
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March 2009

Primary cystic germinoma originating from the midbrain.

J Clin Neurosci 2009 Jun 18;16(6):832-4. Epub 2009 Mar 18.

Department of Neurosurgery, Akita Red Cross Hospital, 222-1 Nawashirosawa, Saruta, Kamikitate, Akita 010-1495, Japan.

A primary intracranial germinoma that involves the midbrain is rare. We describe an unusual case of primary cystic germinoma originating from the midbrain. A 29-year-old man presented with diplopia, and his MRI showed a cystic, ring-like enhanced lesion in the thalamo-mesencephalic junction. Open biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of germinoma was based upon the histopathological findings. Following chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the symptoms improved and the tumor disappeared. We propose that primary intracranial germinoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of midbrain tumors, because early diagnosis and appropriate treatment for midbrain germinoma improves clinical outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jocn.2008.08.024DOI Listing
June 2009

Accurate diagnosis of peripheral small cell lung cancer with computed tomography.

Tohoku J Exp Med 2009 Mar;217(3):217-21

Department of Radiology, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita, Japan.

Small lesions are frequently detected in the lung with computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice. It is important to know the CT features of small-sized peripheral small cell lung cancer (SCLC) for early-stage diagnosis. We reviewed the CT findings of SCLC that presented as a solitary peripheral nodule without associated lymphadenopathy. This study included 12 patients (11 men and 1 woman; mean age, 68.5 years) with peripheral SCLC of diameters ranging from 9 - 28 mm (mean, 15.4 mm). We evaluated the findings with thin-section CT for each peripheral tumor; emphasis was laid on the predominant internal characteristics (whether the mass is solid), tumor-lung interface characteristics (whether the mass is well-defined with a smooth surface or with lobulation or spiculation), and surrounding structures (the presence or absence of perivascular thickening adjacent to the tumor). In all patients, most portions of the tumor consisted of a non-calcified solid mass. Contrast enhancement in varying degrees was observed in the tumors of all 8 patients, who were evaluated with enhanced CT. The tumor-lung interface characteristics observed on the CT images included a well-defined mass with a smooth surface (n = 5), a well-defined mass with lobulation (n = 3), and a mass with spiculation (n = 4). An irregular perivascular thickening adjacent to the tumor was observed in 4 patients. We conclude that peripheral SCLC without associated lymphadenopathy manifests as a non-calcified solid mass and is occasionally characterized by perivascular thickening.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1620/tjem.217.217DOI Listing
March 2009

Portal gas in a patient with acute obstructive cholangitis: report of a case with emphasis on US findings.

J Med Ultrason (2001) 2007 Dec 14;34(4):201-4. Epub 2007 Dec 14.

Department of Radiology, Akita Red Cross Hospital, Akita, Japan.

Portal gas is relatively rare, and its relationship to ischemic bowel diseases has been emphasized. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman with acute obstructive cholangitis in whom portal gas was detected by ultrasonography (US) but not by computed tomography (CT). The former showed multiple echo spots moving in the portal vein. Doppler signals confirmed them to be bidirectional and spiky, which immediately led to the diagnosis of portal gas. Immediate appropriate antibiotic treatment and biliary drainage yielded the disappearance of the portal gas. We stress the usefulness of US and Doppler US for detecting and diagnosing portal gas. Our observation suggests that when portal gas is detected by US, the possibility of cholangitis should be included in the differential diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10396-007-0156-9DOI Listing
December 2007

Spontaneous regression of multiple lung metastases following regression of hepatocellular carcinoma after transcatheter arterial embolization. A case report.

Hepatogastroenterology 2007 Jul-Aug;54(77):1560-2

Department of Radiology, Akita Redcross Hospital, Akita, Japan.

Spontaneous regression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a rare phenomenon. Some reports have described cases of spontaneous regression of HCC, but there have been few cases with spontaneous regression of only metastatic lesions from HCC. We report a case of a 70-year-old woman with multiple lung metastases from HCC that regressed spontaneously following regression of HCC after transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case that multiple lung metastases regressed spontaneously following TAE for HCC. Numerous mechanisms for spontaneous regression of HCC have been suggested such as subintimal damage, blood transfusion, alcohol withdrawal, infection, hemorrhagic shock, hepatic artery occlusion and herbal medicine. Our case, however, had no connection with any such symptom and medication. Our case suggests that the mechanisms leading to spontaneous regression in remote organs may be associated with activation of host immune response involving cytokines.
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December 2007

Portal-systemic shunt through the right renal vein developing following portal tumor thrombus.

J Med Ultrason (2001) 2006 Sep;33(3):181-4

Center of Diagnostic Ultrasound and Department of Radiology, Akita Red Cross Hospital, 222-1 Inashirozawa, Saruta Kamikitade, Akita, 010-1495, Japan.

Despite the semi-routine use of color Doppler sonography for evaluating portal circulation abnormalities, there is a relative paucity of information on portal-systemic (P-S) shunt through the right renal vein (P-SR shunt). We report such a case. The patient was a 60-year-old woman with hepatocellular carcinoma on liver cirrhosis. Serial sonography showed an aggravation in findings; an increase in the size of the tumor was followed by formation of a portal tumor thrombus, and then occurrence of a P-SR shunt. We present this case, with a comparison between the patient's clinical course and the color Doppler results. To our knowledge, this is the first report to make such a comparison in a P-SR shunt case. We also briefly review the literature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10396-006-0094-yDOI Listing
September 2006

Inflammatory pseudotumor of the spleen: report of a case with emphasis on contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings.

J Med Ultrason (2001) 2006 Sep;33(3):177-80

Department of Radiology, Akita Red Cross Hospital, Akita, Japan.

Splenic inflammatory pseudotumor is a rare pathology, and the literature stresses the difficulty of preoperative diagnosis. There are no previous reports of contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings for this tumor in the literature. Our case appears to be the first to be examined using this technique. In our case, contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed the mass to be homogeneously and less enhanced than the surrounding parenchyma in all phases, and it included fine enhanced spots. We also briefly review the literature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10396-006-0097-8DOI Listing
September 2006

Primary carcinoid tumor of the liver: report of a case with an emphasis on contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic findings.

J Clin Ultrasound 2005 Jul-Aug;33(6):302-4

Center of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Red Cross Hospital, 222-1 Saruta Kamikitade, Akita, Japan.

We report the case of a 82-year-old man with primary carcinoid tumor of the liver. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed 2 well-demarcated, round tumors in the right lobe (4 x 4 cm and 1 x 1 cm). The lesions were both markedly echogenic with many small cystic areas. Contrast-enhanced US showed the whole tumor to be quickly and highly enhanced, suggesting the highly vascular nature of the lesion, and the findings corresponded well with hepatic angiographic results. The patient underwent a US-guided needle biopsy, which yielded histological results consistent with a carcinoid tumor. Considering his age, we selected radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for treatment. After treatment, contrast-enhanced US demonstrated complete disappearance of blood flow signals, indicating satisfactory treatment. Our case showed that US and contrast-enhanced US findings can lead to a high suspicion of carcinoid tumor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcu.20132DOI Listing
February 2006

[A case of cystic cavernous angioma accompanied by a fluid-fluid level on magnetic resonance imaging].

No To Shinkei 2004 Aug;56(8):695-9

Department of Neurology, Akita Red Cross Hospital, 222-1 Nawashirozawa, Akita 010-1495, Japan.

We describe the case of a patient with cavernous angioma (CA). A 44-year-old woman complained of numbness on the left side of the body as an initial symptom of the disease. The initial magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a cystic mass with a fluid-fluid level without perifocal edema in the right thalamus on the T 2-weighted image (T 2WI) and T2*-weighted image (T2*WI). Her symptoms were self-controllable; therefore we decided to observe her natural course only with serial MR imaging. The cystic mass was not enhanced by gadolinium on T1-weighted images, although, we suspected the tumor was complicated by vascular malformation. Therefore, we performed cranial angiography to eliminate the possibility of bleeding from the vascular malformation. Angiography did not demonstrate tumor staining nor vascular malformation. Longitudinally, the tumor demonstrated mosaic signal intensities on each sequence with perifocal edema. Moreover, the tumor exhibited hypointensities on T2* WIs without perifocal edema. The natural history of the tumor on MR imaging exhibited a typical case of CA. Some previous reports described cystic CA with perifocal edema and vascular malformation. In our present case, we clinically diagnosed CA on the basis of the final MR imaging together with previous reports. An intra-axial fluid-fluid level is a very rare finding of MR imaging. Here, we report the case of a patient with cystic CA accompanied by a fluid-fluid level. This finding is not a pathognomonic sign of CA; although, we consider that it is very important to follow up carefully the natural history of such cases.
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August 2004

Pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery ruptured into the superior mesenteric vein in a patient with chronic pancreatitis.

J Clin Ultrasound 2003 Jun;31(5):278-82

Center of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Red Cross Hospital, 222-1 Inashirosawa Saruta Kamikitade, Akita 010-1406, Japan.

We report the case of a patient with chronic pancreatitis that was complicated by the rare occurrence of a pseudoaneurysm of the gastroduodenal artery that ruptured into the superior mesenteric vein. The patient, a 65-year-old alcoholic man, suddenly experienced hematemesis. Gastroesophagoscopy revealed bleeding from esophageal varices; the hemorrhaging was controlled with sclerotherapy. Sonography identified a 2-cm round anechoic mass at the pancreatic head, and color Doppler imaging revealed turbulent arterial flow within the mass, leading us to the diagnosis of the pseudoaneurysm. CT and angiographic findings generally corresponded with those of sonography and confirmed our diagnosis. The pseudoaneurysm was treated successfully with embolization, and the patient was discharged 10 days after therapy. Follow-up sonography performed 2 months later confirmed the absence of blood flow within the lesion. Color Doppler sonography was very useful for diagnosing the pseudoaneurysm and planning its treatment, and we recommend its routine use in patients with chronic pancreatitis to avoid delays in diagnosing and treating such vascular complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcu.10170DOI Listing
June 2003

[Bladder cancer producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF): a case report].

Hinyokika Kiyo 2002 Aug;48(8):495-8

Department of Urology, Tuchiura Kyodo General Hospital.

A case of bladder cancer producing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is reported. A 76-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with gross hematuria and leukocytosis. He was diagnosed with advanced bladder cancer. His white blood cell (WBC) count and serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) level were elevated (peak WBC 22,010/microliter, peak G-CSF 351 pg/ml), which immediately normalized after cystectomy. The histopathological diagnosis was transitional cell carcinoma, grade 3, pT4, pN1. Immunohistochemical examination was positive for G-CSF and G-CSF receptor. There has been no recurrence of cancer for more than 23 months since the operation without any additional therapy.
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August 2002
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