Publications by authors named "Tahereh Zarei Mahmoudabadi"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Comparison of poly ferric chloride and poly titanium tetrachloride in coagulation and flocculation process for paper and cardboard wastewater treatment.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Jan 28. Epub 2021 Jan 28.

Occupational Health and Safety Research Center, NICICO, World Safety Organization and Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran.

The current study investigated the efficiency of poly ferric chloride (PFC) and poly titanium tetrachloride (PTC) in coagulation-flocculation process for treatment of paper and cardboard wastewater. The effect of pH (5-11), coagulant concentrations (100-1000 mg/L), mixing rate (10-60 rpm), mixing time (5-25 min), and settling time (5-30 min) were examined. The results showed that the removal efficiency for turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) by PFC and PTC coagulants increased with pH rising up to 9 for the former and 7 for the latter coagulant. Furthermore, the removal efficiency for the afore-mentioned parameters increased along with a 30 rpm increase in the mixing rate, while the mixing time reached 20 min. It was also found that the best removal efficiencies for turbidity, TSS, and COD by PFC under optimal conditions (pH 9, coagulant dose 800 mg/L, and settling time of 25 min) were 97.11%, 99.1%, and 84.91%, respectively. In addition, the removal efficiencies for PTC (optimal conditions of pH 7, coagulant dose 600 mg/L, and settling time of 15 min) were found to be 98.29%, 99.29%, and 86.42%, respectively. Water recovery and the produced sludge volume by PFC were 80% and 200 cm, respectively, in the settling time of 25 min and for PTC were 81.5% and 185 cm, respectively, in the settling time of 15 min. Costs of the coagulation-flocculation process for treatment 1 m of paper and cardboard wastewater using PTC and PFC were 0.42 $ and 0.32 $, respectively. Finally, it can be concluded that compared to PFC, PTC with higher settling rate has a greater efficiency for treatment of paper and cardboard wastewater.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-12675-6DOI Listing
January 2021

Removing Disperse red 60 and Reactive blue 19 dyes removal by using Alcea rosea root mucilage as a natural coagulant.

AMB Express 2019 Jul 22;9(1):113. Epub 2019 Jul 22.

Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Science, Abarkouh Paramedical School, Yazd, Iran.

In terms of health, dyes have carcinogenic, mutagenic and toxic properties and can have adverse effects on health and the environment. Therefore, sewage containing to dyes must be purified before being discharged into the environment. The current study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of Alcea rosea root extract in Disperse red 60 and Reactive blue 19 dyes removal from synthetic sewage. In this study, the effect of different indices including pH (5-11), Alcea rosea concentration (50-300 mg/L) and initial dye concentration (10-80 mg/L) was investigated. During the tests, the coagulant was stirred with rapid mixing at a speed of 250 rpm for 2 min. In the following, the speed (30-60 rpm) and the time (10-25 min) were used for slow mixing and after mixing the effect of settling time (10-60 min) and temperature (20-70) on removal efficiency of Disperse and Reactive dyes was investigated. The results showed that the maximum of removal efficiency of Disperse and Reactive dyes in optimum conditions including (pH = 11, coagulant concentration = 200 and 250 mg/L, dye concentration 40 and 20 mg/L, speed 60 rpm, during 15 min with settling time 60 min and temperature 60 °C obtained 86% and 68%, respectively. According to the result, the Alcea rosea coagulant has the best ability in removing dyes from aqueous solutions and sewage, especially Disperse dyes. Disperse dye is much eliminated in the coagulation process due to its lower solubility, higher suspending materials and less required solved chemical oxygen demand to the total chemical oxygen demand (SCOD/TCOD).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13568-019-0839-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6646624PMC
July 2019