Publications by authors named "Ta-Jen Hung"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Functional characterization of ECP-heparin interaction: a novel molecular model.

PLoS One 2013 11;8(12):e82585. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China ; Department of Medical Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Human eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN) are two ribonuclease A (RNaseA) family members secreted by activated eosinophils. They share conserved catalytic triad and similar three dimensional structures. ECP and EDN are heparin binding proteins with diverse biological functions. We predicted a novel molecular model for ECP binding of heparin hexasaccharide (Hep6), [GlcNS(6S)-IdoA(2S)]3, and residues Gln(40), His(64) and Arg(105) were indicated as major contributions for the interaction. Interestingly, Gln(40) and His(64) on ECP formed a clamp-like structure to stabilize Hep6 in our model, which was not observed in the corresponding residues on EDN. To validate our prediction, mutant ECPs including ECP Q40A, H64A, R105A, and double mutant ECP Q40A/H64A were generated, and their binding affinity for heparins were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Weaker binding of ECP Q40A/H64A of all heparin variants suggested that Gln(40)-His(64) clamp contributed to ECP-heparin interaction significantly. Our in silico and in vitro data together demonstrate that ECP uses not only major heparin binding region but also use other surrounding residues to interact with heparin. Such correlation in sequence, structure, and function is a unique feature of only higher primate ECP, but not EDN.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0082585PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3859622PMC
October 2014

Basic amino acid residues of human eosinophil derived neurotoxin essential for glycosaminoglycan binding.

Int J Mol Sci 2013 Sep 16;14(9):19067-85. Epub 2013 Sep 16.

Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan.

Human eosinophil derived neurotoxin (EDN), a granule protein secreted by activated eosinophils, is a biomarker for asthma in children. EDN belongs to the human RNase A superfamily possessing both ribonucleolytic and antiviral activities. EDN interacts with heparin oligosaccharides and heparin sulfate proteoglycans on bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the binding of EDN to cells requires cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and the binding strength between EDN and GAGs depends on the sulfation levels of GAGs. Furthermore, in silico computer modeling and in vitro binding assays suggest critical roles for the following basic amino acids located within heparin binding regions (HBRs) of EDN 34QRRCKN39 (HBR1), 65NKTRKN70 (HBR2), and 113NRDQRRD119 (HBR3) and in particular Arg35, Arg36, and Arg38 within HBR1, and Arg114 and Arg117 within HBR3. Our data suggest that sulfated GAGs play a major role in EDN binding, which in turn may be related to the cellular effects of EDN.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms140919067DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3794821PMC
September 2013

A novel cell-penetrating peptide derived from human eosinophil cationic protein.

PLoS One 2013 4;8(3):e57318. Epub 2013 Mar 4.

Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short peptides which can carry various types of molecules into cells; however, although most CPPs rapidly penetrate cells in vitro, their in vivo tissue-targeting specificities are low. Herein, we describe cell-binding, internalization, and targeting characteristics of a newly identified 10-residue CPP, denoted ECP(32-41), derived from the core heparin-binding motif of human eosinophil cationic protein (ECP). Besides traditional emphasis on positively charged residues, the presence of cysteine and tryptophan residues was demonstrated to be essential for internalization. ECP(32-41) entered Beas-2B and wild-type CHO-K1 cells, but not CHO cells lacking of cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), indicating that binding of ECP(32-41) to cell-surface GAGs was required for internalization. When cells were cultured with GAGs or pre-treated with GAG-digesting enzymes, significant decreases in ECP(32-41) internalization were observed, suggesting that cell-surface GAGs, especially heparan sulfate proteoglycans were necessary for ECP(32-41) attachment and penetration. Furthermore, treatment with pharmacological agents identified two forms of energy-dependent endocytosis, lipid-raft endocytosis and macropinocytosis, as the major ECP(32-41) internalization routes. ECP(32-41) was demonstrated to transport various cargoes including fluorescent chemical, fluorescent protein, and peptidomimetic drug into cultured Beas-2B cells in vitro, and targeted broncho-epithelial and intestinal villi tissues in vivo. Hence this CPP has the potential to serve as a novel vehicle for intracellular delivery of biomolecules or medicines, especially for the treatment of pulmonary or gastrointestinal diseases.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0057318PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3587609PMC
August 2013

Inhibition of the interactions between eosinophil cationic protein and airway epithelial cells by traditional Chinese herbs.

BMC Syst Biol 2010 Sep 13;4 Suppl 2:S8. Epub 2010 Sep 13.

Graduate Institute of Molecular Systems Biomedicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.

Background: The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is cytotoxic to bacteria, viruses, parasites and mammalian cells. Cells are damaged via processes of pore formation, permeability alteration and membrane leaking. Some clinical studies indicate that ECP gathers in the bronchial tract of asthma sufferers, damages bronchial and airway epithelial cells, and leads to in breathing tract inflammation; therefore, prevention of the cytotoxicity caused by ECP may serve as an approach to treat airway inflammation. To achieve the purpose, reduction of the ECP-cell interactions is rational. In this work, the Chinese herbal combinative network was generated to predict and identify the functional herbs from the pools of prescriptions. It was useful to select the node herbs and to demonstrate the relative binding ability between ECP and Beas-2B cells with or withour herb treatments.

Results: Eighty three Chinese herbs and prescriptions were tested and five effective herbs and six prescription candidates were selected. On the basis of effective single-herbal drugs and prescriptions, a combinative network was generated. We found that a single herb, Gan-cao, served as a node connecting five prescriptions. In addition, Sheng-di-huang, Dang-guei and Mu-tong also appeared in five, four and three kinds of prescriptions, respectively. The extracts of these three herbs indeed effectively inhibited the interactions between ECP and Beas-2B cells. According to the Chinese herbal combinative network, eight of the effective herbal extracts showed inhibitory effects for ECP internalizing into Beas-2B cells. The major components of Gang-cao and Sheng-di-huang, glycyrrhizic acid and verbascose, respectively, reduced the binding affinity between ECP and cells effectively.

Conclusions: Since these Chinese herbs reduced the binding affinity between ECP and cells and inhibited subsequent ECP entrance into cells, they were potential for mitigating the airway inflammation symptoms. Additionally, we mentioned a new concept to study the Chinese herbs using combinative network in the field of systems biology. The functional single herbs could be identified from the set of prescriptions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1752-0509-4-S2-S8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2982695PMC
September 2010